Would I be able to inherit the house since I am her only child? 26 Answers as of January 13, 2013

Before my mother passed away, she sold our home to a friend using a quick deed, because she could no longer afford to live there. I was about 16 years old. About a year ago, the friend was evicted from the home because the paperwork wasn't in order/correct. I am now 20 and am curious about the situation with the house. The house was in my grandmother and mothers name, and after my grandmother’s death solely in my mothers. I have no idea how to go about this, or even who to call. Thank You.

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Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
You can inherit the house if it is titled in your mother's name. If it is both names there may be claimants in addition to yourself.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 1/13/2013
Bassinger & Harvey
Bassinger & Harvey | Randy J Harvey
You should retain an attorney to investigate the status of the title of the home. If there was no mortgage on the property it is possible you may still have an interest in the property.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 1/10/2013
James Law Group
James Law Group | Christine James
Your situation cannot be answered by a simple email. Much more information is needed. Specifically why was the friend "evicted" and by whom. Certainly contact an attorney to meet with them and discuss.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/10/2013
Lampton Law Firm LLC | Norman Lampton
Who evicted the friend!
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 1/10/2013
Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
Look at the deed that has been recorded in the county Register of Deeds. Was the quit claim deed in error?
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 1/10/2013
    James Oberholtzer, Attorney at Law
    James Oberholtzer, Attorney at Law | James Oberholtzer
    Your question does not make sense. If your mother sold the house, it is sold whether the Deed was correct or not. There must be more to it.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Irsfeld, Irsfeld & Younger LLP | Norman H. Green
    Find out how title rests on this property. I've never heard of anybody being "evicted from the home because the paperwork wasn't in order/correct."
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Law Office of Pamela Braynon | Pamela Y. Braynon
    Once your mother sold the house she relinquished all rights to the home. No matter that it was done by quick claim deed or general warranty deed. Look at it in the sense as if you sold a car to your friend. You would no longer have any rights to the car.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C.
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C. | Brian Haggerty
    Well, you can start by asking your local title company for a "customer service" or "trio" on the property. This will tell you who owns the property, according to the official county records.

    It's hard to imagine how the "friend" gets evicted from the property, unless he/she took out a loan secured by the property and then defaulted on it.

    If title was in your mother's name, and she sold it (that is, received money or property having approximately the right value in exchange for the house), that probably cuts off any right you might have.

    But find out who has the record title now, and then go see a lawyer and see if there is any possibility of recovering the house.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Law Offices of Frances Headley | Frances Headley
    You should consult a probate attorney to review all of the documents and related facts and advise you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    SmartWills
    SmartWills | Scott Pesetsky
    Hire an attorney to get a property report and read over the deeds.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    It is doubtful that you have any rights in the house. Your mother gave those up when she signed the quit-claim deed.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
    You should meet with an attorney who can review the title chain and advise you of your rights or lack of rights.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    WARM SPRINGS LAW GROUP | Elliott D. Yug
    You need to talk with an attorney and have the attorney review all the paperwork.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Martin Barnes - Attorney at Law
    Martin Barnes - Attorney at Law | Martin Barnes
    You may have a property interest in your mother's home. However, there are a number of open questions based on the facts as you stated them. I encourage you to see an Indiana attorney to help you determine whether or not you have rights that can be exercised.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 1/9/2013
    Frederick & Frederick PLC | James P Frederick
    Someone needs to review that deed and the eviction paperwork. It is hard to give you any guidance without knowing what took place. Normally, there would be no right to evict, because the friend would be the owner. Since that is not the case, here, more information is needed.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/9/2013
    Huddleston Law Group, LPA | C L Huddleston
    Evicted by whom? By your mother? Did she die after the eviction? Is anyone living there now? Is there an attorney involved in probating your mother's estate, which, if she owned real estate, would be necessary?

    If you will re-post your question indicating the county in which the real estate is located, I may be able to refer you to an estate specialist who can help you.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Ben T. Liu Law Office
    Ben T. Liu Law Office | Ben T. Liu
    You should contact an attorney to review the situation. Who evicted the friend?
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski
    Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski | Gerald A. Bagazinski
    It is possible the property was lost for failure to pay property taxes. I would suggest you go down to the county register of deeds grantor grantee index if you want to find out what happened to the property. The quit claim deed would have taken you out of title.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/9/2013
    Victor Varga | Victor Varga
    Need more details. What paperwork wasn't in order/correct?
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    Neil J. Lehto, Esq.
    Neil J. Lehto, Esq. | Neil J. Lehto
    You'll want to secure the home, get a real estate title search and, as appropriate, open a probate estate to transfer the home into your name.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/9/2013
    The Legal Center | Richard Manwaring
    You need to speak to a probabe attorney. Sounds like there could also be a need for a real estate attorney. Regardless, if the property has any chance of passing to you it will require an order from probate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/9/2013
    Law Offices of Charles R. Perry
    Law Offices of Charles R. Perry | Charles R. Perry
    You need to meet with an attorney to review your rights. The story does not make sense, as you tell it. If the house was sold to the friend, it makes no sense that the friend was evicted. In any event, it is not possible to tell you what you might be able to do without reviewing the documents involved in the transaction between your mother and her friend.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/9/2013
    Winnick Ruben Hoffnung Peabody & Mendel, LLC | Daniel N. Hoffnung
    Need to get a title search of the house to better understand issues.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 1/10/2013
    THE BROOME LAW FIRM, LLC
    THE BROOME LAW FIRM, LLC | Barry D. Broome
    If the house is still in your mother's name and not assigned to another person then you could inherit. Your first step is to hire an attorney and probate your mother's estate. Your financial plan is not complete until it is co-ordinated with your estate plan. Will your family be provided for when you are gone? Without a Will, the court will decide.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 1/9/2013
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Call an attorney with details, you may own the house.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/9/2013
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