Will Stealing on a Military Base Show Up on My Civilian Record? 20 Answers as of July 11, 2013

I was caught stealing on base. I am 20 and don't have anything on my record. I was wondering if this would go onto my civilian record and show up on background checks.

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Law Offices of Scott Tibbedeaux
Law Offices of Scott Tibbedeaux | Scott Tibbedeaux
You can have your record checked to see if it appears on the results. If this happened while you were a juvenile then the record can be sealed.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/20/2011
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
I do not know how the military reports criminal convictions which occur on base. You should check with the military JAG office to see how they view military convictions as pertaining to one's civilian record.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 6/20/2011
Law Office of Richard Williams
Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
If you were charged with stealing on a military base there is almost certainly a record of your arrest and conviction. This record is likely a permanent record.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 6/17/2011
Andersen Law PLLC
Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
It may show up on an NCIC record. Basically, the federal government maintains everyone's criminal record. Whether their offense is state, federal or municipal, NCIC maintains all records. Most background checking companies subscribe to NCIS. The good news is you may be able under federal law to have your record expunged or sealed. Call the Federal Public Defender's office in your area. They may be able to steer you in the right direction for clearing your record. Once it is cleared, NCIS will have no record of conviction and you should have a clean background for most purposes.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 6/17/2011
Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
Military records do show up.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 6/17/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Yes, if they enter it into DOJ criminal database as they normally do.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Lowenstein Law Office
    Lowenstein Law Office | Anthony Lowenstein
    It depends in which Court you were convicted. For more information, please see my website.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    I would say that you now have a federal record since the activity occurred on federal property. You will likely see the record on a background check.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    Generally it will be reported to civilian authorities but not always. You should check with your military attorney to see if it was or will be reported to civilian authorities.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Robert Mortland
    Robert Mortland | Law Office of Robert Mortland
    YES. This will likely be on your criminal record unless a dismissal or deferred entry occurs.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    If you were arrested and fingerprinted, you should expect that it will show up on your civilian record. If you were in the military when it occurred and were put out as a result of it, you may have to explain your discharge, irrespective of your criminal record.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Harrison & Harrison
    Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
    Yes, it will show up.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    The simple answer is that assuming the district court/magistrate court clerk submits it to NCIC, then I would assume it would show up. You should consult with a criminal attorney about all your rights. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    You should direct your question to a JAG officer. Any criminal offense can show up on a criminal record. By "civilian" record I assume that you mean a record with, as in Michigan, the State Police CCH or the LIEN record, or FBI record. In a State or Federal Court, there are reporting requirements. If you went before a military tribunal or court, then there may be reporting requirements. This is where the JAG officer can assist. They may be familiar with, or can look up, the reporting requirements to the State system or the FBI system.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Try calling the Judge Advocate General's Office and ask them.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    Whether the matter will show up on a civilian record depends on how you are prosecuted. If the matter is handled as an Article 15 matter, it probably won't show up. On the other hand, if you are court marshalled, that is a federal prosecution and would show up on a civilian record.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    Any criminal record, whether federal, state, or military will show up on your record as a conviction of either the Vehicle and Traffic Law, Federal Law, Public Health and Safety Law, Military Law, Executive Law, or International Law. Only convictions from another country may not show up on the NYSID or Federal computer record and the police can check with Interpol for your out of the country convictions.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    I don't practice military law, so I cannot say for certain. An attorney who practices military law could let you know for sure.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/16/2011
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