Will the person who gave the affidavit of support for a permanent residence card be affected if we now apply for cash aid? 6 Answers as of September 11, 2012

Will it affect my parents who gave the affidavit of support, for when I filed petition for my husband who has his permanent resident card, if we are in need of getting food stamps and cash aid here in the state of CA?

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Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny
Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny | Svetlana Boukhny
Yes, possibly. The affidavit of support is a contract between the sponsor and the government in that the government will go to the sponsor for reimbursement of any means-tested public assistance the government has paid out to you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/11/2012
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
It could. An affidavit of support mandates that the supporting person will take care of the supported person financially so that the person being supported does not receive any type of welfare benefits.

The welfare agency can demand repayment from your parents.

You need to speak face-to-face to an immigration attorney and discuss with him/her all of the facts of your situation.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/16/2012
Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, A PC
Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, A PC | Brian David Lerner
Hello: Yes and the government can go after that person.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/16/2012
Law Offices of Patricia M. Corrales
Law Offices of Patricia M. Corrales | Patricia M. Corrales
Absolutely. The person who submitted an affidavit for support signed basically a contract with the U.S. government promising to financially assist you in your endeavor to become a legal resident. The promise included that the affiant (he/she) would remain liable for any government aid provided to you. This is a serious question and one that requires legal advise. Please contact a lawyer with immigration experience to better assist you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/16/2012
World Esquire Law Firm
World Esquire Law Firm | Aime Katambwe
Yes they will if the new resident turns out to be a public charge. So will you by the way. It is advisable for him to work at least 40 work weeks or 1 year before considering this kind of benefit. Put something in the pot before taking out from it.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/16/2012
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