Will my warrant ever go away? 16 Answers as of June 10, 2013

In 2005 I jumped a 2500.00 bail and left the state. The charges were theft misdemeanor, but I was on a probation deferment for the same charges except it was a felony. I've been arrested a couple of times but they just say it's non extraditable. Will it ever go away? Does it lessen with time?

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Law Office of Geoffrey M. Yaryan
Law Office of Geoffrey M. Yaryan | Geoffrey M. Yaryan
It's likely it well never go away.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/17/2011
Miller & Harrison, LLC
Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
I would not expect it to go away.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 5/16/2011
LynchLaw
LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
Unfortunately, when you leave the State the statute of limitations stops running.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/16/2011
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
No. Records and warrants are forever. Otherwise the defense of run and hide would destroy the criminal justice system by letting people away with their crimes. For you to handle this, you must turn yourself into the court, with or without an attorney, and try to negotiate a plea bargain on the warrant and new Failure to Appear charges, and renegotiate any outstanding charges. Doing so voluntarily will result in a better outcome than you being brought in cuffs to court after arrest on the warrant. Effective plea-bargaining, using whatever legal defenses, facts and sympathies there may be, could possibly keep you out of jail/prison, or at least dramatically reduce it, and may enable you to get your probation and programs reinstated. If this is a felony, the defendant must be personally present at every court hearing and appearance. You face potential jail and fines, so handle it right. Unless you're competent to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor trying to put you in jail, most people hire an attorney who can. If serious about hiring counsel to help you in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/16/2011
Law Office of Evan E. Zelig
Law Office of Evan E. Zelig | Evan E. Zelig
No, the warrant will not just go away. It will continually result in your arrest and, depending on where you are, may or may not result in your extradition to clear up the warrant and resolve the case. It will not simply go away on its own, however.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/16/2011
    Anderson & Carnahan
    Anderson & Carnahan | Stephen Anderson
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/10/2013
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    No, it will be outstanding forever until you have taken care of it. I have seen warrants executed and people brought to jail 10-15 years after the warrant was issued.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Never goes away, until you take care of it by appearing.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/16/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    It will always be there and will give the cops something to detain you with. Get an attorney and take care or it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    No, it doesn't go away or lessen. You generally need to appear in person to have it recalled but you should speak to an attorney about other possible options. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    The only way it will go away by itself is if you die, and a death certificate is received by the court that issued the warrant. You should contact an attorney to explore what is called a "Serna" motion, whereby prejudice is presumed after 1 year (law enforcement's lack of effort in locating you is one of the factors the court will consider in whether to dismiss the charges).
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    They rarely extradite misdemeanor cases.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    It will never go away on its own. If you want it to go away it would be best to contact an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts | Andrew Stephen Roberts
    No it will not go away until you and your attorney deal with it in front of the court. I just resolved a case with similar circumstances from 2000. Time does not make it go away.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman | Gabriel Dorman
    No, the warrant will not just go away and it will actually get worse for you the longer you don't take care of it. Eventually, this will catch up with you. If you live out of state, you can hire an experienced criminal defense lawyer to represent you and try to resolve your pending cases in this state with as little consequence as possible. Without knowing more about your situation, it is hard to give further advice at this time. In any case, you have nothing to lose by contacting an experienced criminal defense attorney to thoroughly evaluate your circumstances. I hope this answer was helpful. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
    California Criminal Defense Center
    California Criminal Defense Center | Ardalon Fakhimi
    Your warrant will not go away by itself nor will it lessen with time. You must appear in court or have an attorney appear on your behalf and request that the warrant be recalled pending completion of your underlying case. SInce your case is rather old, your chances of a favorable resolution may be increased. This all depends on the nature of your case and the strength of the evidence against you. Some of the evidence that previously existed may no longer be available (ie, location of witnesses, fading memory of witnesses, etc...).
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/13/2011
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