Will my son go to jail for stealing a vehicle? 68 Answers as of July 03, 2013

My 18 year old son stole a four-wheeler. He was asked by the police to come in for questioning. He admitted to doing it. They haven’t arrested him yet. What will happen to him? He has a clean record with no trouble prior to this. Are they going to put him in prison?

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Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
You will have to see if he gets charged and if so what are the actual charges. If he gets charged he should hire an attorney.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 12/30/2011
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
He'll probably be charged eventually. However, he is presumed innocent until proven guilty. The prosecutor must prove any allegations beyond a reasonable doubt. He should get a lawyer. Whether, if convicted, he gets any jail time will depend on a litany of factors. Generally, though, for offenders between the ages of 17-21, there may be diversionary programs for first-time offenders, even for felony charges, that could keep a conviction off his public record. However, it depends on the county, the type of charge, the circumstances, and a litany of other factors. He should retain a lawyer. If he cannot afford to retain a lawyer, the court should provide him one if he is ultimately charged and asks for one when he is arraigned.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 12/28/2011
Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle is punishable by incarceration and/or fines. It depends on whether charges are ever filed against your son.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 12/14/2011
The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
A lot can happen and jail time is always a possibility.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/12/2011
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
No, I would imagine he would be eligible for probation.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 7/3/2013
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    It is nearly impossible to answer your questions as stated here. I know from experience, what you want to know is what will happen at court. No lawyer can know that in advance. I do not know the jurisdiction who was the victim (it makes a difference - if he stole from his employer, that changes things since the DA would be politically motivated to be tougher on your son, same if the victim is elderly or politically important. The jurisdiction also has a lot to do with it, steal a 4-wheeler in a town where they are rare will get one result, steal one in the country where everyone has one - well you can see how your jury may look at it differently.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    He could be charged with a felony. This can carry 5 years in prison but iwht no prior record he might get probation. He should get an attorney and see if he can work out a deal so that if he does everything they want he ends up with no record. He needs an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Jon M. Martinez Criminal Law Group | Jon M. Martinez
    If your son admitted to stealing a four-wheeler, he is likely facing charges of Theft of Means of Transportation. In Arizona, this is a class 3 felony offense and has a maximum penalty of 8.75 years in the prison with a presumptive of 3.5 years. He is also eligible for probation if he has never been convicted of any other felony offenses for a maximum of 5 years. A class 3 felony offense also has a maximum fine of $150,000 and an 84% surcharge. Because your son has never been convicted of any prior felony offenses, he is more likely to receive probation as opposed to being sentenced to prison. However, even if he is granted probation, he is still facing up to one year in the county jail. Depending on which county the offense occurs, there is a high probability that the County Attorney will recommend a jail sentence if he is granted probation. As a former Deputy County Attorney prosecutor in Maricopa County, (Phoenix and surrounding area), I know that the County Attorney has a policy to recommend no less than 90 days in jail for any theft of means of transportation conviction. It is up to his attorney to make sure that your son does not receive any jail time. It is equally important to have an attorney who can negotiate the best plea deal possible. For example, your son will be charged with a class 3 felony offense that would remain a serious felony on his record for life. However, it may be possible for his attorney to negotiate a significantly better deal that could help him avoid a felony record. One way of doing this would be to negotiate a plea that would reduce his charges from a class 3 felony to a class 6 undesignated felony. If this occurs, his felony would be reduced to a misdemeanor once he successfully completes probation.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Orent Law Offices, PLC
    Orent Law Offices, PLC | Craig Orent
    There is no way for me to give you an intelligent, accurate answer without knowing details about the case and your son. Clearly though prison is a possibility. You or your son should seek counsel to assist you directly and personally as opposed to online. The charges are serious and despite his admission etc., an attorney should review the case, assess, and then properly advise your son of his options.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Your son will likely be arrested. As he is 18 and never been in trouble he will likely be afforded youthful offender status and will not face prison.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Law Office of Michael R. Garber
    Law Office of Michael R. Garber | Michael R. Garber
    He'll probably get a suspended sentence and probation and order to make restitution or return the 4-wheeler.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Your son will probably charge your son with TMVWOP (Taking a Motor Vehicle Without Permission). I wish you had contacted me before your son spoke to the authorities because he likely convicted himself by saying anything to law enforcement. He has the right to remain silent and the right to have an attorney. He should have exercised both. That said, he has very little to gain by going into the station for an interview. They will read him his rights; take a statement and arrest him. He needs an attorney ASAP and he needs to shut his mouth. With no record, your son may be eligible for diversion or at the least the First-Time Offender Waiver Sentencing Option. Under this option, The court may sentence him from 0-90 days in jail; not prison. He may get the option of work crew in lieu of jail. Right now, he should pay restitution for any damage he did and get an experienced criminal defense attorney. He should keep the court and the police informed about any address change and his attorney should be in touch with the prosecutor's office early on to position this case for the best possible outcome because it is unlikely your son would be acquitted, having given the police the best evidence of guilt.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Leonard J. Levenson Attorney At Law | Leonard J. Levenson
    It’s up to the judge. If the bike is worth less than $1000.00 it is very unlikely, he will go to jail.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/31/2013
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    It is very difficult to predict the sentence as there are so many factors that are considered. His age and lack of record will work in his favor; since I don't know the details of the case it's hard to say what other aggravating and mitigating circumstances exist. At this point, the case does not even "exist" yet. This will not happen until he is arrested and the DA has issued the charge and there is always a chance that the case will not be charged at all. The law regarding custody has recently changed and will most likely work in his favor.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Law Office of William L Spern | William Spern
    Hard to say as you do not indicate if your son had any juvenile record that would impact any potential sentences. If no other convictions, your son may be eligible for HYTA sentencing. This is a probation wherein if your son completes the term of the probation, the case would be dismissed with no record of a conviction. You should seek the services of a criminal attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    Probably will get probation or a good attorney can get it dismissed. However, never speak to the police without an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    If a person takes a car without the permission of the owner he can be charged with joy riding or grand theft auto. If it is joy riding then he most likely receive probation. If it is grand theft auto he probably will do time. A good attorney will greatly improve his chances.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    If your son's record is clean he is not facing a presumptive prison sentence. If he is convicted of the charge, and assuming that he receives a probationary sentence, the court can impose local jail time as a condition of probation. This can run anywhere from 0 to 365 days. It is rarely either extreme.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Law Office of Ronald Aronds, LLC
    Law Office of Ronald Aronds, LLC | Ronald Aronds
    Until he gets charged and I can see the actual charge against him I can't say for sure what type of penalty he is facing. In general though, theft of a motor vehicle could certainly lead to some jail or prison time. Please contact my office for a free consultation if your son gets charged.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 12/12/2011
    Robert Valles and Associates P.C.
    Robert Valles and Associates P.C. | Robert Valles Jr.
    He will most likely be charged with felony theft. He has a clear record and no prior felony convictions means he is probation eligible. Most likely receive probation.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    He will likely be arrested depending on the facts of the case. The fact that he has never been arrested before is a good factor in his defense but this does not give weight to whether the police department will execute an arrest warrant. If the charge is a misdemeanor, he is looking at up to one year in county jail. A felony charge will hold a greater penalty.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Adesina Law Office, P.C.
    Adesina Law Office, P.C. | Adebayo Adesina
    He probably should not have gone in without representation. However, since he already gave the confession and the police did not arrest him immediately they may show. If your grandson does not have a criminal background he may be able to plea bargain and avoid jail time.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Based upon the value of the four wheeler, your son could be charged with a felony. Since this is a first offense and he has nothing on his record, the likelihood of him going to jail is probably minimal; however, jail time is only one issue of concern and perhaps based upon the circumstances, a minor issue. Perhaps more important, if your son is convicted of a felony he will loose certain constitutional rights. He will be prevented from enrolling in the military (if he has that desire); he will be denied admission to many universities. He will be disqualified from all federal educational grants, scholarships and student aid. He also could be disqualified for may jobs.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    The Law Offices of Scott L. Little, LLC | Scott L Little
    Since he admitted to doing it the police mark seek an arrest warrant or the State's Attorney may file a criminal information thus charging your son with theft under Maryland Law. In light of the fact that he admitted to stealing the same he will probably be convicted if tried (Assuming his admission was voluntary). It is not likely that he would go to prison given his age, lack of criminal history, and the fact that this is a property crime as opposed to a crime against a person.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Aaron Black Law
    Aaron Black Law | Aaron Black
    Your son is most likely charges with Theft of Means of Transportation. This is a class 3 felony in Arizona. With a class 3 felony one of three things could happen: 1) probation; 2) probation and up to one year in county jail; 3) prison 2 - 8.75 years. It is important you have an attorney review the case and see if there are any issues that need to be litigated. Also, an attorney may be able to have the charges reduced.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Rhoades & Miller, LLP
    Rhoades & Miller, LLP | M. Jason Rhoades
    First off, your son shouldn't answer ANY more questions without a lawyer present. The theft will be charged as a felony, so he certainly could face jail time. It is possible to negotiate a sentence of probation, depending on the jurisdiction, and other factors.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    It depends on whether you live in a conservative county, whether the prosecutor is willing to enter into a plea agreement, and whether you hire a competent attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    A felony theft offense can be very serious. A conviction would leave an indelible mark on your record and it can impact future employment and other opportunities. As a result, an aggressive defense is necessary. A felony offense occurs when there is a theft in excess of $1000. The greater the value of the item, the greater the potential penalties. On a felony, jail time is possible and, perhaps even likely upon conviction. If your son has a clean record and/or viable defenses, he may be able to avoid a conviction with a Stay of Prosecution which, upon completion of certain conditions, may result in a dismissal of the charge.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    I assume the value of the vehicle is over $500 so it would be a felony and he is facing prison. With no history we may be able to have the matter handled so it does not end up on his record.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    You need to get him a lawyer if you can afford it. He shouldn't have spoken to the police without one!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    What the ultimate penalty might be will depend on what he is convicted of. With a clean record, while there could be jail time, prison is not likely.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of Christopher G Humphrey PC | Christopher G Humphrey
    They could, but they will usually give an 18 year old a chance to not be a felon under 7-13-301. The DA is in complete control of who will recieve a deferral under 7-13-301. If he got a 301, and finished the probation he would have the case dismissed. he may or may not be offered this chance. Depends on the prosecutor and the county. You can never rule out the possibility of prison. Speak to a criminal defense attorney about your concerns.
    Answer Applies to: Wyoming
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    The McDonnell Law Firm, PLLC
    The McDonnell Law Firm, PLLC | Patrick J. McDonnell
    Police don't put people in prison. Courts do. If the four-wheeler was valued at more than $1,000, and he was charged with grand larceny, he COULD be sentenced to some time, but if he has no prior arrests and the details of his arrest do not uncover any other aggravating factors, a judge will probably not sentence him to jail or prison, but yes, it still is a possibility.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    The fact he went in voluntarily and admitted to the theft should work on his favor. While there is no guarantee what a particular prosecutor will offer, if this is his first offense, no damage was done to the vehicle, the vehicle was returned, then probation and fines should be a realistic outcome. If there was damage or loss he may also be expected to pay restitution, but even then an attorney should be able to negotiate the charges and plea to avoid jail time. You should retain an attorney for your son as soon a possible though so your son no longer speaks to the police without being protected.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Lewin & Lewin | Robert D. Lewin
    Unless there are some egregious facts that you have left out, there is absolutely no reason why your son should ever see the inside of a jail cell in this situation. You should get a good criminal lawyer RIGHT NOW to go talk to the police to see if something can be done to keep the case out of court entirely. You don't want your son to have a criminal record; keeping the case out of court will ensure that he does not get a record. Almost every day we talk to the police in situations like your son's and in many of them we are able to get the "case" diverted away from the criminal court system. Many of the police departments have a diversion program; although these diversion programs are usually reserved for juveniles (kids under 17) sometimes we convince the police to divert the case of an 18 year old. Even if the case cannot be kept "out of court", many times we can get the police to set the case up for a hearing before a clerk-magistrate of the court. The clerk-magistrate can decline to issue a criminal complaint and once again your son would not have a criminal record. Hearings before a clerk-magistrate do not go on a criminal record. There is much that can be done by a competent criminal lawyer if you don't delay.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Offices of Steven R. Hunter | Steven Hunter
    Under Illinois law, Possession of a Stolen Motor Vehicle is a probation able offense. Prison is possible but not mandatory. No one can guarantee an outcome for your son, but first offenders often receive probation.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C.
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C. | Steven Fairlie
    That will depend on whether he is convicted, sentencing guidelines, prosecutorial discretion of the local DA, and the Judge assigned to the case.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Furlong & Drewniak PLLC
    Furlong & Drewniak PLLC | Thaddeus Furlong, Esq.
    Assuming the vehicle is worth over $200 then it's a felony with potential prison time. But with no priors he may get probation if he pays for any damage.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Gutin and Wolverton
    Gutin and Wolverton | Harley Gutin
    Your son should retain counsel. Assuming that he is arrested and based on the fact that he has no prior record it is most likely that he will avoid incarceration and get probation or maybe even a diversion program.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Carter Boyle LLC | Michael Carter
    The police are probably in the middle of their investigation and depending on the charges filed will determine the likelihood of jail time. What you need to do is have an Attorney evaluate the charge and then give you a fair assessment of the case.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Penalties depend on a lot of factors, including age, criminal history, severity of the charges, amount of pecuniary loss involved, character and remorsefulness of the defendant, how egregious the facts are, was anyone injured, has the defendant cooperated on other prosecutions, etc. I can't offer an opinion without knowing all of the details.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Betts Legal Services
    Betts Legal Services | Shawn M. Betts
    He cannot go to prison for a first offense of that nature. He could be charged with a felony given the value of the four-wheeler, but he wouldn't go to prison. He may actually be eligible for a diversion program or some other sort of disposition that keeps the charge off his record, and likely would face a minimal amount of jail if any, probation and fines.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    There is no definite answer to this. It depends on a lot of factors: the victim's imput, who the judge is, any priors, your son's attitude, how strong the case is... He could theoretically do some jail time, but he could also get off with probation. Whatever happens, make sure your son at least consults with an experienced criminal attorney before he agrees to or pleads to anything.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    He is under 19 so he is eligible for Youthful Offender Treatment and will not have a criminal record. he will be placed on probation and i9f he does not violate probation he will not go to jail. He is not a good decision maker. He risked his reputation and future for nothing. He will not get in trouble this time but if he steals or commits a crime again the prosecutor will ask for a jail term.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Offices of Louis M. Leibowitz, LLC
    Law Offices of Louis M. Leibowitz, LLC | Louis Leibowitz
    It is hard to predict sentences, but your son probably can avoid jail. Some judges like to teach you people a lesson in cases like this one. You should retain a lawyer to help your son.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Offices of James H. Dippery, Jr. | James H. Dippery, Jr.
    Depending heavily on the county in which charges might be brought, it is likely that your son might end up doing some time in county jail. There are new sentencing protocols in place, so even if charged and convicted of a felony the most he is looking at is local/county jail time. Depending on his record and the circumstances of the offense it is possible that a misdemeanor vehicle theft charge might be made available.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin | Daniel K Martin
    Your son will probably be charged with unlawful driving or taking of a vehicle or receiving stolen property. There will be a detention hearing to determine whether or not he should be kept in juvenile hall or allowed to remain in the home. Whatever you do make sure that you contact a criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible. The decision to 'detain' your son will depend on how you answer certain questions that are asked for the judge's report.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Offices of James A Bates
    Law Offices of James A Bates | James A Bates
    He probably will not get prison. There will be probation. Try to get this reduced to a misdemeanor. A felony will close so many doors in his life. He won't be able to get a decent job. Hire an attorney in your area and hope for the best. This needs to be reduced.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Mevora Law Offices | Bradley C. Giglio
    Depending upon the value of the vehicle, the circumstances of how it was taken, and prosecutorial discretion, they could potentially charge him with a felony or with a misdemeanor. His lack of a criminal history is a very good factor on his behalf. It is important to get an attorney to discuss with the police what charges they are filing and to represent your son should the police try to question him further. If charges are filed, your attorney can often arrange for a time for your son to go get fingerprinted and processed. Arranging this time can avoid being surprised by the police showing up at your son's school or at your home and arresting him. It can also avoid your son having to spend any nights in jail awaiting a bond hearing if they don't release him from the station. Your attorney can also discuss putting together a mitigation package to present to the prosecution to show your son's character including his lack of a criminal background. This mitigation will be crucial in keeping your son from serving any jail/prison time, lowering the charge from a felony to a misdemeanor, or obtaining a deferred prosecution/or dismissal of the charges.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Thomas C. Brandstrader Attorney At Law | Thomas C. Brandstrader
    Depends on his criminal background and his legal representation.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Ellman and Ellman PC
    Ellman and Ellman PC | Kevin Ellmann
    The short answer is likely no. Given that he has no criminal history and he was cooperative, more likely than not, if they proceed with charges it will be by summons. A plea bargain will also likely be offered and as long as he has good representation, he will probably never see a day in jail.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    The Law Offices of Stephen L. Richards | Stephen L. Richards
    This is a serious offense possession of a stolen motor vehicle. A conviction could prevent your son from getting a license, forever.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Grant & Grant
    Grant & Grant | Richard L. Grant, Esq.
    It is foreseeable that your son will be arrested and charged for Grand Theft, Felony, and would expose him to state prison. However, under the current Realignment Law, time that would have been spent in state prison now will be spent in county jail for non-violent crimes. Further,Orange County is giving one day credit for each actual day spent in jail.. Hence, if your son is sentenced for 6 months in county jail, he will be released in 3 months. In spite of the above, an experienced criminal defense attorney can possible arrange alternative sentencing such as home detention, electronic monitoring, work release, probation, etc. to avoid jail time, if this is your son's first criminal charge.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Depends if he gets charged with a felony of a misdemeanor. He made a huge mistake by going in for questioning, especially without an attorney present. Now he can only wait and a letter will arrive in the mail with his court date.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A.
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A. | Donald L. Blaszka, Jr.
    He will probably be arrested in the near future but not knowing more facts makes it difficult to give you an opinion. The value of the four wheeler is very important because if it is worth less than $1,000, your son will face a Class A Misdemeanor which is punishable up to 12 months in jail and or a $2,000 fine. If the value is over $1,000, then your son may face a Class B Felony (punishable up to 3 -7 years in the NH State Prison and or $4,000 fine) or if over $1,500 a Class A Felony (up to 7 -15 years and $4,000 fine). Now those are just the maximum penalties, not necessarily what your son's sentence may be. He may not even receive a jail sentence, suspended sentence or otherwise. You also have to remember jail is the local county house of corrections and prison is the NH State Prison in Concord or Berlin. There are very big differences between those different types of correctional institutions. Your son should speak with a local NH Criminal Defense Attorney in order to go over the court procedure and potentially represent him during his case.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Phillip A. Arieff Attorney at Law | Phillip A. Arieff
    If he's a 1st offender some counties will have diversion programs and if the offender is successful the case either is dismissed or amended to a municipal ticket(civil). If there actually is a charge and conviction a 1st offender that young will likely get probation.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of James S. Lochead
    Law Office of James S. Lochead | James S. Lochead
    The DA will probably agree to a "no-jail" disposition, along with strict terms of probation and fine or community service.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine | Jerry Lee Wallentine Jr.
    It will likely be charged as a felony and he could go to prison. However, the he will likely be presumptive for probation. However, he may have to serve some jail to as a condition of probation. The fact that he doesn't have a criminal history will be a great factor for him. In fact, he might be able to avoid becoming a felon.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    H. Scott Basham, Attorney at Law, P.C. | H. Scott Basham
    If he has no prior record, it is unlikely that he will serve time. He will probably be offered probation instead. He may even be offered First Offender treatment, under which his record would be expunged if he completes the term of probation successfully.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    DeVito & Visconti, PA
    DeVito & Visconti, PA | John E DeVito
    If your son has a clean record, he is unlikely to go to prison, There are many options available to your son, Because he is under 21, he may be eligible for a diversion program, pretrial probation or a continuance with out entering a guilty finding. All will involve a probationary period but no jail, hire a good attorney and he may receive one of these options.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Unless he is in a really punitive jurisdiction likeKern County or draws a horrible judge and a monster DA as a first offense (assuming the vehicle isn't damaged, etc) he will most likely be put on 3 years probation and fined. Now, if he violates the terms of probation by committing another crime the probation is revoked and then he can do some jail time.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    It depends on the circumstances but I think there is a good chance of no jail and even no convic tion given your son's age and lack of record and cooperation.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    They don't have room in prison for first offenders like this. He will either get it reduced to a misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor like joy riding or get formal or informal probation.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq.
    Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq. | Jeffrey Lawrence Pollock
    With a Felony 3 conviction a possibility, he should retain counsel a.s.a.p. to try to avoid jail time.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 7/3/2013
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Probably not. I would suggest a competent local attorney to help with the resolution. Kid has some things going for him. Lack of prior record, youth, was upfront when confronted. Lots of potential.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    Prison? No. He's likely to face grand theft charges (or in the alternative vehicle theft). Either of those charges can be charged as a felony or a misdemeanor. Depending on the facts, they may only file misdemeanor charges against him. Even if they file a felony, I assume he's looking at probation with some potential jail time and/or community service. You know charges are coming. Be proactive. If you can afford to hire an attorney, get one on board now, rather than wait until he gets taken into custody. Often, the attorney can arrange a surrender, rather than an arrest and having to post bail, in addition to preparing the defense now instead of later. The prosecution is working on building the case against your son... shouldn't he start building his defense.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/9/2011
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