Will I go to jail for not completing my court ordered work program? 7 Answers as of August 29, 2011

I was unable to get booked for the weekend work program due to work and I showed up late to my court date so I had to get put back on the calender. Am I going to jail? This is my first offense.

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Law Offices of Phil Hache
Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
You should speak to an attorney in person or by phone more specifically about your sitiation. A lot will depend on the court you are in, how long you had to complete your work program, the type of offense, etc.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/29/2011
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
It is very unlikely that you will go to jail. However, you need to make things right as quickly as possible. Judges start wanting to throw people in jail if they feel you are not acting responsibly.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/29/2011
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
Going to jail is one of the options the court has for what you did. Not showing up in court when your case is called and not completing your required community service are both probation violations. You could have avoided this by asking for an extension to complete the work. If you go in as soon as you can then a nice judge should reinstate your probation and give you more time to complete your requirements.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/29/2011
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
If this is not your first "failure" to show up for the work project maybe not. However, those are usually run by the sheriff. Best see whether or not he will let you back into the work project.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/28/2011
Law Office of Jeff Yeh
Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
Possibly, which is why you should consider having a lawyer go to court (without you) to get an extension. This lessens the probability that you will be taken into custody.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/28/2011
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