Will I be responsible for debt if I am sharing a credit card? 18 Answers as of June 06, 2011

My partner, whom I live with ,may have to file bankrupcy. She was the original applicant to obtain the cards. At this time, on one or more credit cards, my partner added my name to the part of the form that asked if there would be additional users on the card . As a result, I usually received a card then ,with my name on it. How would the above cc arrangement we have ,effect what she is or is not liable for during a bankrupcy? Is it likely the Judge may allow only a percentage of cc debt to be eligible for her bankrupcy since I had made purchases on the ccs alsoMisc info: Incase needed in you determing an answer. I have made purchases on those cards ,that I can sign on/use over the last few years. The Debt on her cc I am a signer on is 26K. The Debt on her credit cards I am NOT a “signer” on. 30K.

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California's Largest Family of Attorneys
California's Largest Family of Attorneys | Doan Law Firm
Your partner is liable for what she owes under her name. You are liable for what you owe on your name. If your partner files for bankruptcy, you will be liable for joint credit cards under your name. You should file for BK as well.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/6/2011
Law Office of Larry Webb
Law Office of Larry Webb | Larry Webb
Yes, the debtor's entire obligation will be discharged and the non-debtor will remain solely responsible for the debt. If you are a joint applicant, the card will probably be cancelled by the lender.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/3/2011
The Law Office of Mark J. Markus
The Law Office of Mark J. Markus | Mark Markus
You're making this far more complicated than it really is. If she is the signature to the cardholder agreement, she is liable for 100% of the debts on the cards, regardless of whether she made the purchases or not. You are only liable if you used the card, and in that case you would be liable to HER, not to the card company (although this really depends on laws of whatever state govern the cardholder agreement, as well as the agreement itself).
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/3/2011
Benson Law Firm
Benson Law Firm | David Benson
If you are merely an authorized user on the account, your partner's bankruptcy should operate to discharge the debt and you should not be liable on the debt. However, it may appear on your credit report. So I would advise removing your name from the account ASAP.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 6/3/2011
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC | Christopher J. Mercado
Look at the terms and conditions of the CC to see what liability may exist when a primary user files BK.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 6/3/2011
    Daniel Hoarfrost, Attorney at Law
    Daniel Hoarfrost, Attorney at Law | Daniel Hoarfrost
    Your partner's bankruptcy does not affect your obligations under the credit card agreement (unless he/she files a Ch 13)Your obligations to the card co. are controlled by the contract you signed with them.You may be liable for the entire debt, or none of it - it just depends on what agreements you signed.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    Jackson White, PC
    Jackson White, PC | Spencer Hale
    As I understand it, you are not filing bankruptcy, your partner is. I hope I understood that correctly. She has included all of her credit card debt in the bankruptcy (as she is legally obligated to do). You want to know if you will be liable on the debt. The answer to this question depends on who was liable on the debt before the bankruptcy. Whether you used the card or not is not really an issue. The issue has to do with whether you signed an agreement with the credit card company to be liable on all of the debt. If your partner merely authorized you to use a card on her account you are not liable for the debt. The bankruptcy would have nothing to do with your liability. If, however, you did sign an agreement with the credit card company to assume liability on the debt (this is not the same as signing to approve a single transaction at a retail store), then you are still liable for the entire debt on any card that you signed on regardless of your partner's bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    Greifendorff Law Offices, PC
    Greifendorff Law Offices, PC | Christine Wilton
    If you're just an additional user, then nothing will happen to you and the debt will be discharged.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    Burnham & Associates
    Burnham & Associates | Stephanie K. Burnham
    Once you become an authorized user on the credit card you become obligated for the debt, regardless of whether or not you signed the original documents. You are not obligated on any of her individual debts.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    The Northwest Debt Relief Law Firm
    The Northwest Debt Relief Law Firm | Thomas A McAvity
    Your status as an authorized user should not effect her ability to discharge the debt at all. What could potentially effect the dischargeability of the credit card debt is whether these debts were incurred close to the date of filing. In the event that you are not an authorized user but a joint holder on these credit cards, your debt will not be discharged.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    Ursula G. Barrios Law
    Ursula G. Barrios Law | Guillermo Machado
    Your partner will be cleared of all liability with a bankruptcy. You may have responsibility depending on your contractual liability.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
    You are not liable for debt on cards that you are just the "authorized user." If it shows up on your credit report, dispute that with the credit reporting bureaus.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis | Eric Lewis
    If you are merely an "authorized user" and not a co-signer on a credit card, then it is not your responsibility and the entire debt would be discharged in your partner's bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    Bankruptcy Law Office of Robert Weed
    Bankruptcy Law Office of Robert Weed | Robert Weed
    If you are an "additional user" then she is liable for the whole debt and her BK takes care of the whole debt. At the end you said you were a "signer" but I hope that's just a slip.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 6/3/2011
    Law Office of Jackie Robert Geller
    Law Office of Jackie Robert Geller | Jackie Robert Geller
    If you are just an "authorized user", then you are not responsible for the debt to the creditor. Only your partner should be liable.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/2/2011
    Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall
    Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall | William M. Rubendall
    If you are a signer on a credit card you owe the money. If your partner files bankruptcy that we eliminate the filer's personal liability but not yours. All credit cards and other debts must be listed. All, not part of the debt, is covered in the bankruptcy discharge. If you are not a signer on a card you are not affected in her bankruptcy. In some circumstances the creditor will not pursue someone who is an authorized signer but not the original applicant. There is nothing you can do to affect the creditors action against you when you have signed for the debt.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/2/2011
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis | Todd Mannis
    Her bankruptcy will discharge all the debts as to her. If your name is on the credit cards and you used them, you will still be liable. If your name is not on them, you're ok.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/2/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    The answer depends on whether you actually are just an authorized user or a cosigner. If you are the latter you are liable for all the debt on the accounts. Many banks will lie to you and orally say they are doing one but submit paperwork that does the other. You need to meet with a lawyer immediately to review your liability and determine your options.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/2/2011
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