Who takes the immigration visa interview? 13 Answers as of August 18, 2011

Immigrant visa interview is for which person? The one applying or the one coming?

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The Ghosh Law Group
The Ghosh Law Group | Amy Maitrayee Ghosh
The beneficiary of the Petition goes to interview but for marraige case both Petitioner and Beneficiary.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/18/2011
Law Office of Christine Troy
Law Office of Christine Troy | Christine Troy
The person who is coming to the United States. The government may also want to interview the US citizen/employer depending on the circumstance.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/15/2011
Law Offices Colyn B. Desatnik
Law Offices Colyn B. Desatnik | Colyn B. Desatnik
The one coming. Sometimes both. call if you have any questions.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/15/2011
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC | Lynne Feldman
Interviews in the U.S. are with both the Petitioner and the Beneficiary. Most consular interviews include only the Beneficiary.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/15/2011
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Reza Athari
For the beneficiary, but in a marriage based both parties may be interviewed.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/17/2011
    Law Office of Jaclyn Miller
    Law Office of Jaclyn Miller | Jaclyn Miller
    If it is a husband/wife case - I suggest BOTH attend the interview. If not, the interview is for the beneficiary (the one getting the visa.)
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    All American Immigration
    All American Immigration | Tom Youngjohn
    The one coming. Occasionally they come more than once or twice. It's normally not a bad idea for the petitioner to have traveled and to be downstairs, available if needed. (Rarely needed. Nice touch though.) It's always smart to get a second opinion.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Law Office of Nora Rilo
    Law Office of Nora Rilo | Nora Rilo
    If the person is coming to the US from a foreign country, then the only person present at the US embassy or consulate is usually the person coming. However, sometimes the consular officer request the presence of the petitioner, and the petitioner, particularly with a marriage case. can be present if he or she chooses.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Law Offices of Caro Kinsella
    Law Offices of Caro Kinsella | Caro Kinsella, Esq.
    If interview at the U.S. consulate then it is for the beneficiary. If inside the U.S. for both
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    441 Legal Group, Inc.
    441 Legal Group, Inc. | Gareth H. Bullock
    The one coming.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Christian Schmidt, Attorney at Law
    Christian Schmidt, Attorney at Law | Christian Schmidt
    If you apply from within the U.S. for adjustment of status, both petitioner and applicant must appear for the interview. If you apply at a U.S. Consulate outside the U.S., only the applicant for the immigrant visa will be interviewed.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Fong & Associates
    Fong & Associates | William D. Fong
    The applicant for an immigrant visa IS the person coming. Don't confuse this with the US petitioner.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Montefalcon Law Offices
    Montefalcon Law Offices | Alberto G. Montefalcon, Jr.
    When you say "the one applying" I assume you mean, the Petitioner and "the one coming" is the Beneficiary of the petition. Typically, it is the beneficiary that gets interviewed to determine his identity, the authenticity of supporting documents as well as eligibility for the visa applied for. In certain instances, however, specifically in a Petition for an alien spouse, the interview may require both spouses to be present to be "tested" on the bona fides of their marriage, that is, to show that they entered into a valid marriage, with the intention of living with each other as husband and wife as against marrying each other for the sole purpose of getting a green card.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/15/2011
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