Where do I file for divorce? 31 Answers as of June 13, 2011

If I was married in a different state than I currently live in, with which state should I file for divorce?

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Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
Divorce may be filed where either party resides for the requisite time frame. For example, in Texas, at least one of the parties has to live in Texas for Six months, or Texas Courts can refuse to hear the case. Where you go married is not relevant unless you are seeking an annulment.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 6/13/2011
Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
You generally file where you are residency.
Answer Applies to: Connecticut
Replied: 6/13/2011
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
I believe if you live in your current state for more than six months jurisdiction attaches there. Alternatively, you could file where you were married. Stay well.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 6/9/2011
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
Most states have a residency requirement of one year before you can file in their state for divorce. Some, like Nevada, are less inhibited about time requirements. Speak to a local lawyer about the matter. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/9/2011
Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law
Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law | Neville J. Bedford
Generally, each state has its own residency requirement. Locally, the requirements are that you live in the state for one year prior to filing a complaint for divorce.
Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
Replied: 6/9/2011
    Beresford Booth PLLC
    Beresford Booth PLLC | S. Scott Burkhalter
    You file in the state where you now reside. If you have children, you file where you now reside if you have been living there for more than 6 months.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Gresham Family & Bankruptcy Law
    Gresham Family & Bankruptcy Law | Lillian Suelzle Watson
    To answer your question, in Oregon you can file for divorce in the state and county you have lived in for the last six months. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Office of Jackie Robert Geller
    Law Office of Jackie Robert Geller | Jackie Robert Geller
    You need to file in your state of residence. Different states have different thresholds. California, for example, requires that you have been a resident for at least 6 months.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Palomino Law Firm, P.C.
    Palomino Law Firm, P.C. | Debra Palomino
    In Arizona you must reside here at least 90 days before filing for divorce, otherwise Arizona does not have jurisdiction. You need to find out what jurisdiction requirements are in the state within which you reside to determine if you can file there. However, children must reside in a new state at least six months before jurisdiction passes to the new state.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Glenn E. Tanner
    Glenn E. Tanner | Glenn E. Tanner
    If you and your spouse reside in Washington, file in Washington.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Steven D. Keist, Attorney at Law
    Steven D. Keist, Attorney at Law | Steven D. Keist
    Maricopa County Superior Court, there are several Court divisions, Northeast, Northwest, Southeast, or downtown. There is a Zipcode map that will advise you which court location you are to file at.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A.
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A. | Joanna Mitchell
    You should file for divorce in the state where you have established residency and are currently a resident. Where you were married is irrelevant. In Florida, you have to reside here continuously for at least 6 months in order to establish residency. Other states have different requirements.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Seattle Divorce Services
    Seattle Divorce Services | Michael V. Fancher
    The laws vary from state to state on jurisdiction. Talk to an attorney in your state to find out if you can file there.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    You have to file in the state where you live on a permanent basis. The place of marriage has no significance in the context of divorce. In Colorado one of you must have been domiciled in Colorado for at least 90 days prior to filing for divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    State laws vary widely. In Ohio, you would file where your spouse resides or if unknown in Ohio provided you have lived here for six months and in the county for 90 days you would file in the county where you reside. To make sure things go smoothly, contact a lawyer near you.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Fredric H. Aaron, Attorney at Law, P.C.
    Fredric H. Aaron, Attorney at Law, P.C. | Fredric Harlan Aaron
    You can file either in the state in which you live or the state in which you were married. You should consult an attorney in your home state to make sure the same rules apply there.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    In Georgia, one must have been a resident of this state for at least 6 months, generally, before he or she can file for a divorce here, irrespective of where they got married. You should consult with a divorce lawyer where you live concerning residency requirements.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    In CT you have to be here for a year and that could include the time it takes to get the divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
    You should file for divorce in the state whose residency requirements for divorce you have satisfied. In California, you need to be a resident of the State for six months and of your county for three months before you are allowed to file for divorce. However, there is no residency requirement to file for legal separation, and after you have lived in the state long enough to qualify for a divorce, you can amend your petition to seek a dissolution of your marriage.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of Patricia Van Haren
    Law Office of Patricia Van Haren | Patricia Van Haren
    You should file for divorce in the state in which you are presently residing.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    The English Law Firm
    The English Law Firm | Robert English
    Depends on the state. In California, if you have lived here for at least six months, you can file your dissolution here.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    You can file in the County you reside in (in California) so long as you have been a resident of the State of California for the last 6 months and the County for the last 3 months. If you are in my area and are looking for an attorney, please contact me for a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Michael Apicella
    Michael Apicella | Apicella Law and Mediation
    File for divorce in the state you currently live in. If in California, you have to be a resident for 6 months. If you've not been here that long, then you can file for legal separation, and then after you've established residency (been here for 6 months), you can amend the separation petition into a divorce petition. If you follow such plan, you can essentially sidestep the divorce residency requirement (i.e., you don't need to wait to open a case with the court and get the process rolling). Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller | Jody A. Miller
    If you and your wife live in the same state, you file in the state in which you both currently live. If you live in different states, check with a lawyer regarding proper venue and jurisdiction. Either way, the state you were married in has no bearing on the case.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    A State generally has jurisdiction once you have resided there for 180 days.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Arnold & Wadsworth
    Arnold & Wadsworth | Brian Arnold
    Check the resident requirements in the state you live right now, it is likely you have fulfilled such and can file there.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Willick Law Group
    Willick Law Group | Marshal S. Willick
    Where one married is irrelevant; every State has its own residency rules governing filing for divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Fox Law Firm LLC
    Fox Law Firm LLC | Tina Fox
    You will file in the state and county that you live in now.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law | Gregory T. Buckley
    It depends on how long you have lived in the new state. Here in Florida, you must be a resident for at least 6 months before you can file for divorce here.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    You left out things necessary to answer you: (1) what state is your spouse in, and (2) what state are you in, and (3) what state were you in, and (4) how long were you in the former and current state, and (5) is the case uncontested. Each of those answers can change the answer on where to file.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/8/2011
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