When can I file for citizenship? 3 Answers as of August 24, 2010

My father and I are both have permanent residence. My father married an American citizen and got his residence from that. Then he filed a petition and got me the residence too. How long do I have to wait before I can become a full citizen? Thank you!

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Pacifica Legal Services
Pacifica Legal Services | Floyd Fernandez
The short answer to your question is that you are able, as a legal U.S. permanent resident, to apply for naturalized citizenship after you have been a legal resident for at least 6 years. If you are able, and you wish to discuss obtaining your citizenship, please by all means e-mail or call (number and address are below). I will be pleased to schedule an in-person or telephone consultation. If that is your decision, I would be honored to render professional services for you. Best to you in your future plans.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/24/2010
JCS Immigration & Visa Law Office
JCS Immigration & Visa Law Office | Jack C. Sung
You can apply for citizenship on the date that is 4 years and 9 months after your green card approval because you got your green card through your father's petition. Your father, however, can apply for citizenship 2 years and 9 months after his green card is approved, assuming (1) he is still married to the US citizen spouse who petitioned him for the green card and (2) if it was a conditional green card that it was removed into permanent green card. If your father has since divorced, for instance, then he has to wait until 4 years and 9 months after his green card approval to apply for citizenship. Please also be reminded that if you have a criminal issue or tax issue, be sure to speak to an immigration lawyer before filing your citizenship applications. Please also know that citizenship application requires continuous residence, and if you or your father has traveled extensively, be sure to speak to an immigration lawyer about continuous residence issue.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/21/2010
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