What will happen to a person charged with B, E and larceny felonies? 20 Answers as of September 19, 2012

My husband was out on probationary bail for a class B and E felony and larceny felony. He was stopped by the cops and they put another felony for B and E on him so it makes three felonies. The last one I was with him and he did not do it. I am getting him out on bail next week.

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Law Office of Richard Williams
Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
If your husband was out on a probationary bond and was arrested on a new offense, it is likely that the State will file a motion to have his probationary bond revoked. If the new charges against your husband are such that there is no probable cause the charges should be dismissed at the preliminary hearing.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 9/19/2012
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Well you should talk with his attorney and explain why you know he did not do it. Then there will probably be a trial if the proescution does not believe that.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/18/2012
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq.
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq. | Jeffrey Lawrence Pollock
He will be prosecuted severely and may well be ordered to pay restitution and served state prison time.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 9/18/2012
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
He could face jail time if his probation is revoked along with any sentence the new charges might have.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 9/18/2012
Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
You've got a winner. Hold onto him tight. In ten years then you see your life is sideways know that it is your choices, NOT his behavior. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 9/17/2012
    Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
    This must be some other state because California does not have classifications of crimes. I cannot help sorry.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    This is not a Florida criminal law question. There are no class b and class e felonies here.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law | Gary Moore
    With the right, criminal lawyer, nothing to happen to him since he has an alibi defense.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    We do not have that category of felony here in Illinois, but I would guess that he is facing some serious jail time, if convicted of the crime. You had better get him to an attorney once he makes bail, as he will certainly need one to work the case and spell out your husband's options.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    He needs counsel. The charges mean nothing it is the conviction that he needs to avoid.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    What will happen? Prosecution on the crimes charged unless they are dropped. The honest answer is that no attorney can predict the outcome, nor even give an intelligent opinion, without reviewing and knowing all the charges, evidence, police reports, expected testimony, priors history, etc. You'll learn the actual charge[s] and any enhancements filed and get copies of all the police reports and prosecutors evidence when appearing for arraignment at the first court hearing. The charges actually filed by the prosecutor will determine how much time could potentially be imposed. In California, if convicted of any felony, you potentially face one or more years in prison, plus fines; on any misdemeanor, you potentially face up to 12 months in jail, plus fines. Priors and strikes will add penalty enhancements. If this constitutes a probation violation, factor those new violation charge[s] and old deferred sentence[s] in as well. If you are charged with any crime, the proper questions are, can any evidence obtained in a test, search or statement be used against you, can you be convicted, and what can you do? A little free advice: exercise the 5th Amendment right to SHUT UP and do NOT talk to police or anyone about the case except with and through an attorney. Raise all appropriate defenses with whatever witnesses, evidence and sympathies are available for legal arguments, for evidence suppression or other motions, or for trial. If you don't know how to represent yourself effectively against an experienced prosecutor intending to convict, then hire an attorney who does, who will try to get a dismissal, charge reduction, diversion, program, or other decent outcome through motions, plea bargain, or take it to trial if appropriate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    If you are on probation or out on bail for current felony charges and get arrested for new felony charges then you may be looking at a prison sentence. You should retain a good criminal lawyer to handle the cases and try to get the best possible disposition in the matter. You will not get jail for a first offense Grand Larceny charge unless it is a very large amount, but if you get arrested while on bail or probation the judge might give you a jail sentence if you are convicted or plead guilty.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Without knowing the facts of the case, I have no way to say, but with three felony charges, it is safe to say, if convicted, he will be doing some prison time. Get an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Your question is far too broad. Defenses may apply to any case and what occurs may depend on the nature of the evidence and the defenses that exist. If convicted, he is most certainly looking at prison time. He should have experienced legal counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    Hire a lawyer and fight the charges. Tell him not to talk with anyone about the matter.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Law Office of Mark Bruce
    Law Office of Mark Bruce | Mark Corwin Bruce
    This is not a California case because we don't classify felonies by letter. This website is only for California criminal cases. Please go to the state in which the case happened to get a clear answer from an attorney licensed to practice in that state.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    It depends on the pre sentencing report.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    The Zwiebel Law Firm, LLC
    The Zwiebel Law Firm, LLC | Elizabeth Zwiebel
    He needs to hire counsel immediately. On a third felony he could face sentence enhancement per the habitual offender act. I would recommend hiring an attorney immediately to begin investigation and also begin negotiations with the prosecutor to see what they are wanting to pursue. Sentence enhancement comes into play when the defendant has previous charges that are felonies.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    If he is convicted on 3 Felony B&E charges he will almost certainly do jail time. The amount of time will depend on many factors such as whether he is in District or Superior Courts, his previous history and the facts of the cases.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    It depends on many factors. What is the evidence? What kind of criminal history does your husband have? Felony sentences in Washington are governed by the Sentencing Reform Act. Please see the Washington State Sentencing Guidelines Comm.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/16/2012
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