What will happen if I got 3rd degree retail fraud and I am pleading guilty? 14 Answers as of March 24, 2013

Will I go to jail? This is the first time I ever got in trouble with the law.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
I would need further information to answer such as the exact charges of the law, how old you are etc. If you are under 20 you may be able to get Youthful offender treatment which means if you get convicted at trial or if you plead guilty the conviction is vacated and the record sealed. Whether you are under 20 or over 20 you may be able to get an ACOD- adjournment in contemplation of dismissal- which means the case is adjourned- usually for 6 months and if you do not get in trouble again the case is dismissed on the adjourned date.You should hire an attorney and disclose all the facts and circumstances to see what can be done.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 3/24/2013
Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
Jail depends on the judge. Criminal convictions will impact future employment.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 3/21/2013
William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
You might have a permanent criminal conviction and you might have to serve the maximum penalty. Ultimately, sentencing depends on whether you have been found guilty, your prior record, how serious these are in the court's eyes, mitigation, and allocution. An attorney can assist you with evaluating the prosecution's case, any defenses that you might have, and any plea offer that might be made, so that you can decide whether to plea bargain or go to trial. If you were to be found guilty, then an attorney can assist you with presenting mitigation, allocution, and a recommendation for a more lenient sentence. and a recommendation for a more lenient sentence. Consider seeking a confidential consultation with an experienced criminal defense attorney. Beware that online posts are not confidential. If somehow the prosecution were to find your post, then it might be used in evidence against you.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 3/21/2013
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
IDIOT.? Do not plead guilty up front. You lose all bargaining power and will have?a theft conviction on your record FOREVER.? What employer wants to hire a thief?? Get an attorney.? Go to court. Plead NOT guilty.? See if something can be worked out.? Maybe a deal can be done where you end up with no criminal record. This is very important if you ever want to get a job.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/21/2013
Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
You might go to jail if it is a felony. You may qualify for a program as a first offender.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 3/21/2013
    Dennis P. Mikko Attorney at Law | Dennis P. Mikko
    While jail is always a possibility, if this is your first time and you have an otherwise clean record, the most likely consequence will be fines, costs, probation and maybe community service in lieu of jail.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    The Law Offices of John J. Carney Esq.
    The Law Offices of John J. Carney Esq. | John J. Carney
    You will not get jail for a first offense shoplifting charge, but You should retain a good lawyer to get it dismissed or you will have a criminal record for the rest of your life.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Law Offices of Amy C. Settlemire | Amy C. Settlemire
    If this is your first offense, you could be eligible for a pre-trial intervention program. This is similar to probation, however, if you successfully complete the program, the offense would be dismissed. It will depend on the county where you are located if this program exists. If the merchant received the goods back, and/or depending on the amount of restitution, you should be looking at probation.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    It is impossible to answer your question. You could be eligible for some form of probationary sentence, community service, heavy fines or jail time. If the amount of stolen goods is relatively minor, your chance of probation is greater. A lot depends on the state and county where the case is pending, some courts are very strict, while your chances of avoiding jail are better in large metro areas. I advise you to hire a good defense attorney, who will find the best resolution for your matter. Before pleading guilty, be sure you know what the consequences are.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Law Offices of Marshall Tauber
    Law Offices of Marshall Tauber | Marshall Tauber
    It is not likely that a first offender goes to jail on a retail fraud. But, with the assistance of a good lawyer, you may even end up with no record of a conviction at all. This is where selecting an experienced attorney will help.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Why don't you talk to an attorney about options if you have no record. I would.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/20/2013
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Jail should be the least of your concerns now. Retail fraud is a crime of moral turpitude, and if convicted you can kiss your career aspirations goodbye. Hire a lawyer before you get duped into a plea that you will regret for life.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Halprin Law Office
    Halprin Law Office | Richard Halprin
    With proper advise from competent counsel, you can probably get probation.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Jail is always possible. You would be wise to retain experienced counsel. Often a conviction can be avoided on a first offense through diversionary programs even if defenses are weak. Do not simply settle for a guilty plea and a permanent record without investigating your options. It is your future on the line.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 3/21/2013
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney