What will happen if I did not to turn myself into jail on time on a court order on a probation violation sentence for 135 days? 44 Answers as of May 29, 2013

The judge gave me 135 days out of 139 days she could of gave me and I had 30 days to turn myself in and failed to do so.

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Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
A warrant will be issued for your arrest.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/4/2012
Law Office of Richard Southard
Law Office of Richard Southard | Richard C Southard
Depending on how much time goes by, you can face additional felony charges of bail jumping. This fact can also be used against you if you are in trouble again and a judge is setting bail.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 9/3/2012
Law Offices of Steven R. Decker
Law Offices of Steven R. Decker | Steven Decker
You have committed another violation of your probation. If this was felony probation be prepared to go to the penitentiary.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 9/3/2012
Law Offices of Mark L. Smith
Law Offices of Mark L. Smith | Mark L. Smith
There is a warrant for your arrest.
Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
Replied: 8/30/2012
Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
You could face an additional charge of Escape from an Institution and face an additional 5 years or more incarceration.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 8/30/2012
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    You need to go to the court house and to the judge that gave you the thirty days stay. Be prepared to go to jail from the court room. However, if your county's jails are as overflowing as they are in Orange or Los Angeles you will do very little time.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
    You will probably get the additional 4 days if the is the maximum left on your sentence. You will probably be arrested at the least convenient time.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    You now have an arrest warrant, and a new failure to appear charge, and a new probation violation charge. To handle a warrant, you must turn yourself in to the issuing court, with or without an attorney. You'll try to negotiate a recall of the warrant[s] and negotiate a plea bargain on the Failure to Appear charge. You'll try to negotiate a plea bargain on the probation violation. Effective plea-bargaining, using whatever legal defenses, facts and sympathies there may be, could possibly keep you out of ADDITIONAL jail time, or at least dramatically reduce it, and may enable you to get your probation and programs reinstated. Unless you're competent to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor trying to put you in jail, most people hire an attorney who can.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    There will be a warrant for your immediate arrest, and if picked up, you will go to jail to serve your sentence, and perhaps all 139 days, not 135.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
    Most likely a bench warrant has been issued for your arrest. I strongly suggest that you contact an experienced criminal law attorney for a face-to-face consultation and give him/her all of the facts surrounding your case. He/she would then be in a better position to analyze your case and advise you of your options.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    I would need further information but probably you will be charged with violation of court order and maybe violation of probation.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey | Michael E. Dailey
    Depending on the jurisdiction, you could face a new charge of escape even though you were not "in custody". You may be able to minimize the damage by moving to correct it as soon as possible, but it might help to have a lawyer run interference for you with the court. If the judge has not yet been notified, you may get through it okay. If a warrant has already been issued, you are going to need a lawyer for the new charge. Even if there is no new criminal charge, some judges will order you held on a contempt charge until they get around to considering the matter and then not give you any credit on your underlying sentence for the time you have been held on the contempt charge.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    You are subject to arrest and confinement to serve the sentence the judge imposed.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Law Office of Stuart M. Nachbar, P.C.
    Law Office of Stuart M. Nachbar, P.C. | Stuart M. Nachbar
    Probably yes, and there is probably a warrant out for your arrest for failure to report.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Law Office of Christopher G Humphrey PC | Christopher G Humphrey
    You may get up to 30 days additional for contempt of court.
    Answer Applies to: Wyoming
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Law Office of William L Spern | William Spern
    A bench warrant will be issued for your arrest. You best contact the local police and turn yourself in ASAP.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    There is a warrant out for your arrest if you did not show up and when you are arrested on it you will serve the time imposed by the judge.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    Failing to show would result in a warrant being issued for your arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    T.K. Byrne | Timothy K. Byrne
    You are in contempt of the courts Order. You can receive consecutive time for the comtempt.
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Law Office of Charles J. Block
    Law Office of Charles J. Block | Charles J. Block
    You could get additional jail time for Contempt
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    a warrant will issue and you will eventually go to jail judge could hold you in contempt and put you in jail for up to 6 more months or judge could re-sentence you or you could turn yourself in and apologize to court and maybe nothing will happen but the sentence
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Law Office of Ronald G. Draper | Ronald G. Draper
    A no bail warrant for your arrest will be issued. You are also going to be in violation of the probation and further subject to another longer jail sentence.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    You should get to the jail ASAP with a pretty good reason for your delay. I don't know how long it has been, but if it has been more than a few days, you should expect additional time,
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    They could charge you with another crime. I can help you turn yourself in for a small fee and that should resolve the matter.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    A warrant would be issued for your arrest and you could be charged with additional violations.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/27/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    A warrant has probably issued for your arrest and you may be charged with escape.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/27/2012
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