What will happen if I committed fraud? 37 Answers as of June 07, 2011

I committed fraud. I have never done any illegal things before. I don't know what owners will do.

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Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman
Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman | Scott G. Hilderman
They will either file charges or ask you to pay the money back. Of course they can do both. If it is more than $1000 in Montana it will be a felony.
Answer Applies to: Montana
Replied: 6/7/2011
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
Your options are to come clean to the victims and hope for the best, or stay silent and hope they don't find out. If the victims find out and report it to the police, you may be contacted and possibly arrested and charged. An attorney can advise and help you but probably can't entirely stop the wheels you've set in motion.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/25/2011
Law Office of Geoffrey M. Yaryan
Law Office of Geoffrey M. Yaryan | Geoffrey M. Yaryan
What amount of money is involved? This is necessary to know whether it is a felony or a misdemeanor.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/25/2011
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
Depending on the amount in question and your relationship with them, they may not pursue any criminal charges against you. Otherwise, depending on the amount at issue, you may be facing a felony, however, you are likely exposed to probation as a result of your clean record. Stay well.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 5/25/2011
Beaulier Law Office
Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
You should hire legal counsel immediately and make no further statements to your employer or to police without an attorney. Often, if it is a first offense, serious penalties and even a criminal conviction can be avoiding. The strategy for defense would depend on the particular facts of the case.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 5/24/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    I would need more details since fraud can be many things with many different degrees of seriousness and with many different amounts of money or merchandise involved and thus with a wide range of different possible charges and convictions and punishments. You should hire an attorney and disclose all the facts and circumstances.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/24/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    This will depend mostly upon whether or not you have been arrested or have reason to believe that charges are being filed against you. The extent of any financial gain received as a result of the fraud will also be factored into possible sentencing. If you believe that charges are going to be filed against you or you have been arrested then you should hire a criminal defense attorney in your area as soon as possible to begin work on your defense.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 5/24/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    You need to call and schedule an appointment. Without knowing the facts, I cannot really help you, but I have handled cases where there has been financial fraud that had not been discovered by the employer. My client came and we worked through it nicely. Thank you.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    First, what type of fraud? Have the owners reported it to the police? Ultimately, if it is reported, it will be up to the prosecuting attorney to determine whether any criminal charges will be brought. Until there is a decision as to any possible criminal charges, there is no way of determining what may happen to you.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    Your question is vague, to say the least. Everything I can tell you is conjecture, as nothing has happened to you, yet. You do not say in which way you committed the fraud, or if the victim is aware of your misdeeds/ What can happen is hard to predict. Depending on your relationship to the victim, and the amount stolen, will probably have an impact of what will occur next. Before doing anything, it is advisable to talk with an attorney who can give you information on how to proceed. If summoned to questioning by any law-enforcement agency, take counsel with you. If the victim merely wants you to repay his damages, be sure to get a release of any liability, civil or criminal before paying him back. If arrested, depending on who you victimized and how much you stole, will determine how you are charged, misdemeanor or felony, IF charges are pressed in the first case. You could be sentenced to anything from probation to prison, again depending on what you did. Contact an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    First of all, commission of fraud in a criminal context has to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt. Therefore, you should not make any statements admitting anything. They may be used as evidence of the alleged fraud. Next, the answer is "it depends." Much will depend on what the alleged fraud is all about. It may remain in a civil context, where damages are sought. It could be brought to the prosecutor for consideration of a warrant. The most helpful advice I can give is to not make any statements to an insurance company, a detective or police officer, or even to friends or on the internet, concerning what you may have done or not done. the nexxt best advice is to retain an attorney to advise you more specifically in this matter. I hope that this was helpful.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
    I would advise you to contact an experienced criminal defense attorney for a consultation. Most attorneys provide free initial consultations. This response does not contain specific legal advice. If you need specific legal advice, you should retain an attorney to assist you with this matter. Generally, with allegations of criminal conduct involving a business, the process starts when someone, usually the "victim," contacts the local authorities. The local police will review the initial allegations then possibly refer the matter out to the appropriate agency, or they may conduct the investigation themselves. If the conduct is potentially a federal issue, for example, the FBI would then start the investigation. In some limited instances, people will start the process directly with a federal agency. The Attorney General's office in respective state may be involved as well, especially if the allegations involve some type of financial matter. In many instances for financial matters, people send their initial complaints directly to the state Attorney General's office. It's all a factually specific issue and depends on the alleged conduct. The police agency in charge of the investigation may take a significant amount of time to investigate and review the matter prior to sending their reports to the prosecuting attorney. The investigating agency and potential prosecutor depend on the specific type of allegations involved. Some matters involving businesses can be very complicated and may involve thousands of pages of documents depending on the type of conduct. These investigations can take potentially years. Further, the potential penalties range from civil infractions (i.e., fines and costs,) and low level misdemeanors, to very serious felonies, so each particular circumstance is unique. The investigating authority may obtain warrants or take other steps as part of this process. They may request, conduct, and complete interviews with prospective witnesses, including the potential defendant. Again, it all depends on the particular circumstances. Once the investigation is completed, their findings will be sent on the appropriate prosecuting authority. The particular prosecutor depends on whether it is a federal or state issue, the type of charges, the particular court, and several other factors. If it involves allegations of financial criminal activity and involves state law, there is a good chance the Attorney General's office will be involved. If the prosecuting authority wishes to proceed with the case and if the conduct is allegedly a misdemeanor or felony, a criminal complaint will be filed and a warrant will be requested in the appropriate court. At that point, the person charged will need to turn themselves in and be arraigned on the charges. In some instances, there may be a civil lawsuit filed instead. A person charged with a criminal offense is presumed innocent until proven guilty. If person believes they may be charged with an offense, especially with an offense that may require a complicated investigation, it is very important that they consult with and potentially retain an attorney as soon as possible. What a person says or does during a pending investigation will be potentially used against them if charges are ever filed. Further, the investigating authority may request interviews and request to conduct an interrogation of the potential defendant. It is vitally important for a person to know their rights. The right council and guidance will make a big difference.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    Fraud is a broad term and is not a crime in and of itself. It can encompass civil fraud or be an element of a specific criminal offense. Mostly commonly it is an element of theft or embezzlement which can be misdemeanors or felonies depending largely on the amount involved. Without knowing the specifics of what is involved in your case, I would advise you to consult an attorney to see if you can work out something before the police are called.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Have you been charged or just caught by owners? There are many variable such as amount of fraud reason for fraud private company vs public entity. You should contact a criminal defense lawyer ASAP.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    The Woods Law Firm
    The Woods Law Firm | F.W. Woods Jr.
    If you committed fraud you could be sentenced to 5 to 10 years in prison depending upon the type of fraud involved. If you have not been charged, call the owners, tell them there has been a problem and try to make it right. If you have not been formally charged you may be able to avoid a charge altogether.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    Does the person know you committed fraud? What is your relationship with the person? How much money is a issue? Over what period of time? No one can possibly know the answer, because you have not provided any information. If you want to know how plea offer are constructed then view FAQ on my website.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts | Andrew Stephen Roberts
    You need attorney as you face potential criminal and civil actions. Fraud is very serious. A conviction can jeopardize your entire future with respect to jobs, loans, education, etc. Call me to discuss further as there are steps that can be taken to possibly reduce the consequences.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    You do not give enough details, but regardless, you need to hire a lawyer to represent you. An experienced attorney such as myself will be able to offer you confidence that you will be represented by the best and can help you through the process and tell you what to specifically expect each step of the way.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    What kind of fraud are we talking here? Is it a felony or misdemeanor? What was the monetary value of the fraud? The answer to the question heavily depends on those factors. If you have nothing on your record, you may be eligible for a diversion program which basically is a form of probation that involves community service. If that is successfully completed then the charge will not appear on your record. You should consult with or retain an experienced criminal attorney right away.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    The Law Offices of Dustan Neyland
    The Law Offices of Dustan Neyland | Dustan Neyland
    The first thing you need to do is consult with a criminal lawyer to determine if there is any criminal liability. There is also civil fraud that does not necessarily rise to the level of criminal fraud. Depending on what the alleged fraud entails will determine what level of criminal offense may be charged. You could be charged with a misdemeanor or felony theft or if the fraud is based on a land transaction or forgery of a government document, then you could be charged with a felony offense.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    It depends on what you did. Sometimes if you make it right with the victim he will not report it to the police. If it is reported then it is up to the DA to see if there is enough evidence to charge you. It is the DA that goes after you criminally.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    A number of things. You can potentially be sued civilly and prosecuted criminally. The first can relieve you of money. The criminal ca put you in jail and relieve you of money. Hire a attorney for at least a consultation. Do not say anything to the cops. If you have said something, say no more.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Don't talk to the owners or the police. Hire your own counsel and strategize your moves very carefully. Call me to discuss.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You have not given me enough information about yourself or your case to tell you what the likely consequences are but assuming that you are young or have no prior criminal criminal record it is very likely that you will be allowed to plead to a misdemeanor Petty Larceny and be sentence to 1 year probation. If you violate probation you face a year in jail. In America crime is on the rise because education and morals are declining. We have smart phones and stupid children. I highly recommend that you concentrate on getting a good education, developing relationships and connections with others, establishing a good reputation, developing good communication skills, and choose a career that you love and are suited for. Having a criminal record can ruin your chances for success and you are probably a nice person who deserves a good life...but you will have to earn success with hard work, good decisions and the help f your friends and family. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    It's not what the owners will do that should concern you, it is what the local prosecutor will do once the owners report the fraud. You should get a lawyer before you start incriminating yourself with investigators who will come knocking on your door soon.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    If by that you mean you committed a crime that someone could report to the police, you face potential criminal charges. When charged with a felony, you potentially face one or more years in prison if convicted.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Have you prosecuted. The devil made be do it is not a defense.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    I would recommend that you retain an experienced criminal lawyer to advise you as to all your rights and options. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    It depends on what the fraud consists of and how much money was involved. A fraud action might be brought in state court or federal court, The victims are not the ones who bring the charges as a fraud is a crime against the peace and dignity of the United States or the State where the fraud was committed. The prosecutor is the one who brings the charges. The owners merely file a complaint.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Sharifi & Baron
    Sharifi & Baron | S. Yossof Sharifi
    Call a lawyer and get everything into place to minimize the damages. Depending on the amount involved, you could be facing an extremely serious felony, or just a simple misdemeanor and a lawsuit. But don't take any chances, hire a lawyer today.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    You may be charged with civil or criminal fraud. Depending on what you gained by fraud, you could be charged with theft. If the owners haven't caught it yet, undo it. If the police are involved say nothing to them or the owners. Without more information, that's about all I can tell you. Please give me a call and we can discuss this more in depth.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    Without more details, I can't even guess. If you can afford to hire an attorney for some advice, you should do so. If you have family who can help you, now is the time. Do not talk to the police or anyone else about what happened. If the police have not been notified, it's possible there will be no criminal charges. The owners might not report it to the police if you go to them, apologize, and pay back what you took, but that might cause them to report it to the police, and it could be used against you at trial. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law | Edward A. Kroll
    You should get an attorney right away. I would also caution you to avoid making admissions of guilt on an open forum, even though these questions are anonymous. It's hard to say what WILL happen. What could happen is you could be arrested and charged with a crime. This is why you need an attorney immediately.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    "Fraud" is a very broad category, and depending on what exactly you did, the possible charges can include several felonies - Forgery, grand theft, embezzlement, identity fraud. . . If you're under investigation, your best advise is to keep your mouth shut, don't discuss this with anyone except your attorney... and find an attorney ASAP.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
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