What is the timeline after breaking probation? 5 Answers as of June 20, 2011

I was arrested for a violation of probation 2 weeks after my new charge. I was told they have 72 hours to violate you. Is this true?

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Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
No, they can violate you whenever they want to. It's up to your PO and the Judge, but be assured you will be violated if you have a new charge. Even just failing to advise your PO of any new charge is a violation in and of itself. Hire a good lawyer right away. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/20/2011
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
I am not aware of any such rule but it could be a rule of that particular probation department that the probation officer must decide whether in addition to the new charge, to also violate your probation.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/20/2011
Palumbo and Kosofsky
Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
If you have an attorney, you should be consulting with him on this question. If you do not, you should retain our office.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/20/2011
Law Office of Jared Altman
Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
I don't think that there would be any 72 hour time limit.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/20/2011
Law Offices of John Carney
Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
They have 72 hours to arraign you, but your attorney may waive the probation hearing and plea to the violation for a promise of no jail time. It depends on whether the DA can prove that you are guilty of the new crime which is an automatic violation of your probation.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/17/2011
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