What should you do if you find out police came to your home to ask you questions? 59 Answers as of August 24, 2011

I had a strange call at work today, the fellow who lives above me in the apartment building ran into police officers outside of the building. They were trying to gain entrance, at least as he tells me, to speak to me and had some questions for me to answer. I have a clean slate, no trouble with the law, no issues with child support or debt... or anything, to my knowledge. I am a law student, full-time single father, and work part-time as an unemployment advocate. Any ideas how to find out what this was about? If or when I should be questioned? With or without an attorney? I have nothing to hide nor am I a criminal, but this thing asked for a category and police do not tend to do civil disputes.

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Austin Legal Services, PLC
Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
It could be a number of things. They could merely want to question you about something or someone you may know that happened in the vicinity or any number of other reasons, some benign and some more serious. Usually they leave a card with contact info when that happens. You can always give them a call to find out what they want. Keep in mind that no one ever has to talk to the police or answer questions. If if makes you feel better, retain an attorney.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/24/2011
Harrison & Harrison
Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
Sounds odd, but if they really want to talk to you, they will be back. If the questioning gets too personal or seems to focus on you, politely tell them you aren't comfortable talking to them and shut up. If they won't leave or won't let you leave, tell them you are saying no more without the advice of an attorney.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 8/20/2011
The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
You should hire an attorney to represent you. Police can always return to ask you questions at inopportune times. They may be very persistent. If you are represented, you can hold out your attorney's card and ask to speak with your attorney and refuse to answer questions.
Answer Applies to: Hawaii
Replied: 8/15/2011
Law Office of Andrew Subin
Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
You can call them and find out what its about. Before making any statements to them, however, I would talk to an attorney.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/15/2011
Andersen Law PLLC
Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
Never talk to the cops without a lawyer present. Since you have no idea why they were looking for you, I would not speak with them at all. You can go on line to the Washington courts website and check to see if there are charges pending but don't cooperate or speak to the police. If they have decided you are guilty, they will use what you tell them to screw you.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/15/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Hire an attorney to contact the police and find out what this is about. Do not contact them yourself. If you are a law student you do not need any trouble with the police.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    As a law student you should already know the cardinal rule - the less you say about anything the better. Start with the basics, look online. Go the the website of the local sheriff, find out if there is a warrant. Check online at the clerk's office, see if there is a case with your name on it. Check the adjoining county too. If all else fails, call the police station in question, ask if they are looking for you, then ask to speak to the detective in charge of the case and the very first thing you want to know is what role are you playing - ie: suspect, witness, etc. If you are only a witness, they will talk to you on the phone - even then be careful what you say. If the officer will not talk to you on the phone, beware and my advice, do not answer even one single question without a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Law Office of Sara Sencer McArdle
    Law Office of Sara Sencer McArdle | Sara Sencer McArdle
    It is usually a good idea to go to speak to the police with an attorney. You have no idea what this is about. Therefore, you should consult with an attorney who can investigate what this about. .
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner | Roianne Houlton Conner
    I suggest that you contact an attorney who will contact the law enforcement agency and find out why the authorities were at your apartment.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/15/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Don't take any chances. Assert your right to an attorney, hire one and have the attorney get to the bottom of it.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/14/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    Interesting. First call should be to a bondsman who can see if you have any warrants. Obviously if you have warrants, second call is to a lawyer (and you should make arrangements to make a no-arrest bond - if it is a small bond amount you take the cash and go to the jail and put up the cash. You will get all the money back after the case is disposed. You might even be able to assign it to a lawyer - depends on the county. If it is large and you don't have allthe money, then you pay the bondsman a fee & they put up the bond. You do not get the fee back. In both situations, the bond is put up and you go in and have your mugshot and fingerprints taken and then you are released.) Second - if they wanted to talk to you and they gained entrance to the building, then they would have left a card on your door with a request that you call (unless they had a warrant and didn't want to talk but just arrest you - but if that is true then they probably wouldn't have told your neighbor anything.) If you determine there is no warrant then I would just wait to see if the police contact you. If so, make sure in talking with them that you only take information - do not give ANY. That sounds easy but if the cops are skilled, it may not be. If they want to talk to you about anything whatsoever, get as much information as you can and ask them if you need a lawyer. (They generally say things like if you didn't do anything wrong, why would you need a lawyer, etc. Don't fall for that crap. Just ask them the question to get the reaction.) If you feel the least bit uncomfortable, get their contact information and tell them you will either call them or have a lawyer call them, then go talk with a lawyer. Generally I would advise not to talk to cops about anything without a lawyer but if you are confident that there is nothing you could be investigated about, etc., and because you are in law school I am assuming you are at least somewhat intelligent, then if it were me, I'd try to pick their brains a bit before making a decision whether to lawyer up.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    > AN We recommend you consult with a lawyer about your rights and options and discuss the possibility of the attorney inquiring into this matter for you, rather than you potentially incriminating yourself. Again, please see a lawyer. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    A.L.A. Law Group, LLP
    A.L.A. Law Group, LLP | Lauren M. Mayfield
    From these facts you are under no obligation to speak with them so if you choose not to contact them that is fine. Or you can contact the local police department, if you know which one was that was trying to speak with you, and try to arrange a time to come talk to them at the station or over the phone if you don't feel comfortable speaking with them at your home. If you have no reason to believe you are being accused of a crime or that you have done anything wrong then you should not need an attorney. But if anytime during the questioning it is not about someone else but about something they are accusing you of you should stop the interview immediately and request an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    The police could be coming to your home for almost any reason. However, the police are trained to lie and misinform suspects. If they want to question you about something they think you did they will not tell you that over the phone. Unless you are sure that they dont want to question you about what you may have done, now is the time to get an attorney. Your attorney can contact the police and make an appointment for the two of you to come in and talk with the detective.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Steven C. Bullock
    Contact an attorney and let the attorney make contact with the police. Under no circumstances should you make such contact. The attorney will have the necessary experience to deal with the situation.-
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Law Office of Maureen Furlong Baldwin
    Law Office of Maureen Furlong Baldwin | Maureen Furlong Baldwin
    Since you are a law student, you know that you do not have to talk to police. You also know that if police come to your home and you choose to speak to them, they do NOT need to read you Miranda rights. You may not know that if you choose to speak to police, they can be very persistent and yet appear to be accomodating and respectful. Once you have decided to talk to police, statements such as "I think I may need an attorney" are NOT enough to "turn off" police questioning. And it is fair game for police to say things such as "You don't have anything to hide, do you?" Bottom line: You should get an attorney if police officers want to question you. As a law student, you probably know your 6th Amendment rights kick in before your 5th amendments rights and Right to Counsel is a 6th Amendment right that is harder to waive than your 5th Amendment rights to remain silent. However, police may choose NOT to discuss their ongoing investigation with an attorney. I personally have had police officers tell me what it is they are looking into and the scope of what they want to discuss, and have also had officers politely refuse to discuss anything with me, or simply NOT return calls when I initiate contact. It depends on what they are looking into. Most of the ti8me, police will acknowledge an attorney who has made contact with them and give a general nature of the issue. Often police want to look at a computer if certain sites have been visited. If they have evidence of criminal activity occurrring in your apartment, they will likely return with a search warrant.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    I don't advise people to speak with cops. You might try to call if they left a card and ask why then want to talk. As you may be aware they can lie to you.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    The Chastaine Law Office
    The Chastaine Law Office | Michael Chastaine
    These can be tricky. You really should get an attorney who can then interface with the police to try to find out what, if anything is going on.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Christopher Lee
    Under no circumstances should you EVER speak to the police. Of course, it is natural for you to "explain" or "prove" that you have nothing to hide by speaking to the police; however, this is a huge mistake, as they can take your statements and misconstrue them. The best thing is to hire and attorney and have the attorney contact the police and speak with them on your behalf. Therefore, you will not be incriminating yourself and the police will know to contact your attorney, rather then come knocking on your door to speak with you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann | Christopher J. McCann
    Never talk to police about anything without an attorney. Get an attorney inmediately to contact them.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    If the police really need to speak to you, they will continue to make attempts until they succeed. I would just wait until you hear from them. My advice would be not to initiate any contact. If they contact you and question you about a crime, and you begin to fee uncomfortable with the way the questions are sounding, do not be afraid to stop the questioning and tell them you want to speak to an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Perhaps you were a witness to something. If you are clean, as you indicate, simply call the police. Ask them what they want. You don't have to answer their questions. If it appears from the questions that there is a problem, consult with an attorney before you answer anything.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    This could be for a background check for you or one of your friends. Did they leave a card? If not there is no way to contact them. I bet a classmate used you as a reference for an FBI or USAtty job or something like that.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    You should contact the local police department in your district or try contacting a local attorney who will be able to do some investigating for you to determine what they might be looking for. You could also call the local clerk of court to see if there might be a warrant out for your arrest or something along those lines. If it is determined that there is a warrant for your arrest then you should certainly have an attorney work with you to attempt to have it lifted in return for your promise to appear to answer questions. In any event, it shouldn't hurt to just call your police precinct and tell them that you were told that police had been at your residence and see if you can get some more information which will be able to allow you to determine whether or not you should consider hiring an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Potter Law Offices
    Potter Law Offices | Cal J. Potter, III, Esq.
    If they left their name or a card you can call and ask what the nature of the inquiry is at this time. In addition, if they contact you it is a consensual contact and you may ask them what the contact is about.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    I do not understand your reference to a category. If you want to try to find out what they want to question you about you could either contact the nearest precint to where you live or just wait a while- they will try to contact you again if it is important. You should not answer questions without having a lawyer present.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    If you're questioned, you should have an attorney present, law student or not. You could try calling the police department's detective division and explain that you think the police are looking to speak to you, but I don't suggest it. Other than the police returning again, unless whoever prompted the attempted investigation lets you know, I don't know how you can determine what it is they wanted. Any chance your neighbor was mistaken and they were trying to gain entry to some other apartment and/or were actually looking for someone else? Maybe someone was seen prowling near your apartment and the police came to investigate. I wouldn't go searching for trouble but would wait to see what happens and get an attorney if you're asked to come in for questioning or are arrested.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    It sounds like you may be be the target of an investigation. Speak with a criminal attorney immediately, who may be able to find out why the police are interested in you. You are under no obligation to speak with the investigators, and you shouldn't until you have an attorney at your side. Any statement you make to the police may end up being construed as an admission. This is why you should not speak with the police alone.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law | Eric James Schurman
    You have the right to refuse to speak to the police...and in most situations should refuse to speak to them. The best policy is to have an attorney speak on your behalf. If you choose otherwise, you may want to contact the officer and ask nature of the police inquiry. In so doing, however, do not make any statements or answer any questions whatsoever.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Smith & John
    Smith & John | Kenneth Craig Smith, Jr.
    If contacted by the officers in the future, you should not answer any questions and ask for a lawyer. Each time you are asked a question, state "I want a lawyer."
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    If you really have no idea what this is about, you can call the police or wait for them to try to contact you again. If you suspect you are being investigated for any crime or they suggest that when and if you speak to the officers, then you should stop talking to them and contact an experienced certified criminal law specialist immediately.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    Call the detective or officer who came to your house. Once they start asking questions which could potentially implicate you in a crime however, request an attorney and invoke your right to remain silent. Contrary to popular belief, this cannot be held against you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    If the police want to talk to you they would normally leave a card, if they have gone to your house, or telephone you. I suppose you could contact your local police department and ask them if they are trying to talk to you and why. However, it may be best to just wait and see what happens. Whatever it is about, I strongly advise not talking to the police until you have consulted a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A.
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A. | Michael D. Fluke
    It is always best to deal with law enforcement with an attorney. Anything you say, "can and will be used against you." If they left a card, an attorney can contact the officer or deputy and find out what this is all about. I suggest you consult a local Criminal Defense attorney to discuss your case in greater detail and learn all of your rights and options. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    As a law student, you should know that anything you say to the police can and will be used against you. Until you find out what they are interested in talking to you about it is hard to determine if you should talk to them. Even if they start to question you, remember, you have the right to stop questioning and seek the advice of an attorney which may be a good idea depending on what they want to talk to you about. You have no duty to talk to the police.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Watkins Law Office
    Watkins Law Office | Bob Watkins
    You can volunteer to go to the local station and inquire or wait. If they really want to speak to you they will return. The police engage in investigations that require them to gather information from numerous people; not just those suspected of committing a crime. If you can honestly say you have not knowingly involved in criminal activity perhaps that is the case. If the police find and question you about your involvement in a crime, you may want to exercise your right to remain silent and consult a qualified attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    What you should do is nothing. Do not contact the police. If they din't make a mistake they will return. I tell my clients to not speak to the police and to refer all questions to me. There is nothing the police are out to do but to gather evidence. If they wanted to help someone out they would leave you alone.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    The only way to solve the mystery would be to call the local police station (if that was, indeed, the agency that was there), explain the situation, and see if they want to talk to you. You could hire an attorney to do this but it doesn't sound like you need to since you have nothing to hide. It could be something as simple as being part of an investigation unrelated to you. However, if there is something more concerning I would advise you to hire an attorney to accompany you before you answer any questions. Feel free to call me if you'd like to discuss it further - intriguing situation. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    Don't talk to the police. You should have covered this in first-year criminal procedure in law school. The police are allowed to lie to you about what they want, so there's no way for you to know, unless your attorney negotiates a written agreement with the prosecutor. You can call them and ask what it's about, but it's not much help because 1) you can't trust the answer, and 2) they aren't all that likely to give you one. Innocent people are harassed, questioned, prosecuted, and sometimes even convicted; don't make it easier for them.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Paul Wallin
    Our advise after doing criminal defense for over 30 years is NEVER talk to the police. You should retain an experienced criminal defense law firm. Normally the police agency that wanted to ask you questions is the police department in the city where you live or work. It does not matter you have nothing to hide.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Anderson Law Office
    Anderson Law Office | Scott L. Anderson
    There is no way of knowing without calling the police. Obviously you have a right to remain silent and if questions become obtrusive it would be best to be represented prior to answering. If you have nothing to hide then likely it is a mistake or your neighbor is having fun with you.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    I would have an attorney call and find out if the police were looking for you and why.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Lewis & Dickstein, P.L.L.C.
    Lewis & Dickstein, P.L.L.C. | Loren Dickstein
    Many innocent people with nothing to hide get caught up in allegations that they did something they didn't do. People are wrongfully convicted every day in the United States. Although the system is very good, a wrongful charge still results in a fortune in legal fees and the risk of a wrongful conviction. Don't take chances and hire an experienced Michigan criminal defense lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Michael R. Nack, Attorney at Law
    Michael R. Nack, Attorney at Law | Michael R. Nack
    I will give you the same advice that I have given others on this site, on Law guru and throughout the thirty-three years that I have been practicing law. Do not answer any questions about anything to the police. Do not make any statements to them other than to identify yourself if they do approach you. They have absolute discretion in putting a "wanted" into the system and taking you into custody for questioning even though you have done absolutely positively nothing wrong. They can hold you in custody for up to twenty-four hours without having you charged with any crime. They are not looking for the truth. They do not have any intention of being fair. They will not honor your Constitutional rights. Police violate citizen's Constitutional rights all day every day throughout this great nation. We live in a police state. The only protection you have is to stand upon your Fifth Amendment right and decline answering any questions. You must be brave and you must be strong to pull this off. The police are trained in a wide variety of techniques to persuade you, trick you, or coerce you into giving them a statement. You should, of course, be polite. Show them the respect they think that they deserve. Tell them that you have an attorney and your attorney advised you not to make any statements or answer any questions. Tell them that you must follow the advice of your attorney. Do not believe anything that they may say to you. They lie. They promise people things that the police cannot possibly deliver. Many of my clients have fallen for police interrogation tactics and then face criminal charges in which the prosecutor makes full use of the statements made by the defendant. You wouldn't believe how many cases I have handled in which my client insists to me upon his or her complete innocence despite the fact that the police have obtained an incriminating statement from the defendant. Do not ever waive your Miranda rights. Ask to contact an attorney and then remain silent. If they do not have enough evidence to charge you with anything, they will eventually release you and eventually leave you alone. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    You may entertain their questions, but you are not obligated to answer. Do not answer their questions. Innocent people have been convicted because they answered questions. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    If I had a relationship with the police department involved, I would call the detective in charge of the case, explain that I represented you, and then ask what it was about. I would also say that my client does not agree to be questioned without having me present. My advice is to consult an attorney who practices in the area where you live, and to hire that attorney to do some investigation. Otherwise, acting on your own is a risky venture. Many persons have talked to police thinking that they were innocent of anything, only to find that as a result of the interview they were charged with a crime.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    As a law student there is no time like the present for you to learn to stand up to the police. Call your local police department and ask them why someone was looking for you, and if they say no one was then report the incident as an attempted break-in. Thieves can use the guise of a uniform to gain access to just about anywhere. NEVER be timid about speaking to authority no matter what clothes they wear.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    If it is important to the police they will get back to you. If they do contact you and want to talk to you about anything that even remotely gives you concern, tell them you would be happy to talk to them and to please call your lawyer to set an appointment for that.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    If you have the name and phone number of the cop who came around (and they probably gave it to the neighbor who called you) get an attorney to call the cops and ask what it is about.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Leave sleeping dogs lie. If they come to question you, ask more questions than give answers or simply hire your own lawyer for the whole thing.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Apple Law Firm PLLC
    Apple Law Firm PLLC | David Goldman
    I would never talk to the police without an attorney. Most people who are charged with a crime and convicted find that their statements are used against them.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    If the officer left a card, you can call and ask what they wanted. Do not answer questions or make statements if you are the object of an investigation. Or have an attorney inquire for you.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Laguzzi Law, P.C.
    Laguzzi Law, P.C. | Carina Laguzzi
    They should have left a card. Call the Detective (that's usually who comes knocking with questions) and simply ask what it’s about. He will try not to tell you saying you should come in to the station. Stand firm and tell him you cannot come in without knowing what it’s about. After he tells you, tell him you will call him back. Talk to an attorney FIRST and hire a criminal defense attorney if necessary and let the lawyer take it from there. "Innocent" people get arrested all the time so under no circumstances should you talk to any law enforcement without having your lawyer present (all law students should know that by their 2nd day in). Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    You are correct in your assessment of this matter. Usually, the police have you as a person of interest, in the commission of a crime. This is NOT to say that you will be arrested, but in your case, hire an attorney to go with you to the station, but I would suggest calling the station and attempting to find out what the problem seems to be, but be prepared with having counsel accompany you there in the event they want to interview you.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Law Offices of James A Bates
    Law Offices of James A Bates | James A Bates
    Whether you have nothing to hide or not, never subject yourself to questioning without an attorney present who can direct the questions and make sure they are not trick ones. Cops are allowed to tell you lies to get you to talk. Do not fall for it. They might misinterpret your answers and say you admitted something.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Whether you have something or hide or not, you should NEVER speak to law enforcement. You should always exercise your right to remain silent, and have an attorney present if you ever have to open your mouth. Remember, nothing good can ever come from talking to police. Whatever you say will be twisted around.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/12/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    If it is not already too late, I advise you to exercise 5th Amendment rights to SHUT UP and call a lawyer, as every cop show on TV correctly teaches. The attorney will now have to make any motions to dismiss or suppress evidence that may be appropriate, and defend the charges in court hearings and at trial, based upon all the arguments, documents, facts, evidence, witnesses, surveillance tapes, etc. All that will be available in discovery. Unless you know how to effectively represent yourself in court, hire an attorney who does.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/12/2011
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