What should I do if police want to question me? 79 Answers as of August 08, 2011

I had an accident leaving a golf course, while answering my phone. I veered off the road and hit some decorative stone pretty hard, causing my truck to die and it would not restart. There was no damage except to the truck. I pushed the truck off of the road, left a note with my phone number and got a ride home. Someone saw me and called the police. The police called me and asked me to come back because they thought I had been drinking. I did not get the call until after I was at home, it was late, so I told them I hadn't done anything wrong and was going to bed. They impounded my car, and want to talk to me. What should I do?

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Lowenstein Law Office
Lowenstein Law Office | Anthony Lowenstein
It depends on several factors.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/4/2011
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
Hire a lawyer to get your car back. You don't want to speak to the police yourself. Stay well.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 8/1/2011
Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller
Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller | Thomas Mueller
You did everything you are legally required to do. You have no legal obligation to run down to the police station. You should be able to get your car back after they do a quick inspection
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/1/2011
Beaulier Law Office
Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
Never consent to an interview with law enforcement without first consulting an attorney. the law enforcement officer is not your friend and, in most cases, is seeking inculpatory evidence of an offense. In their interview, there is no requirement that they tell the truth , and, as a result, you may be lead into misstatements by law enforcement tactics.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 8/1/2011
Josh W. Thacker, Attorney at Law
Josh W. Thacker, Attorney at Law | Josh Thacker
Never talk to the police without talking to a lawyer first. If you are arrested before talking to a lawyer, then my advice is simple: shut up until you have talked to a lawyer. Mostly likely, the lawyer will tell you not to talk to the police at all. Lastly, the lawyer could talk to the police on your behalf and try to find out their intentions.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 8/1/2011
    Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC
    Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC | Lacy Fields
    You should consult with an attorney. You are seeking very specific legal advice, which attorneys in Missouri cannot ethically give until they've been retained. However, to give you general information, I usually convey information to the officers on behalf of my client. If they want to question my client in person, I go with him. Once they know an attorney is involved, they often simply leave you alone. Right now I suspect they want to talk to you in the hopes that you will give them the evidence they need to press charges. If that is the case, talking to them without an attorney means that they will likely twist your words.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    Take an sttorney with you and talk to the police with your attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/31/2011
    Gonzalez Law Associates P.C.
    Gonzalez Law Associates P.C. | Carlos Gonzalez
    Hire an attorney immediately!
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/31/2011
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner | Roianne Houlton Conner
    You have the "right to remain silent" use it.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/31/2011
    Harrison & Harrison
    Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
    Politely tell them you do not want to talk to them, then hire a lawyer. Talking to them can only get you into more trouble, and you have no obligation to talk to them.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/31/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    The charge you are looking at is "hit and run unattended/property damage". This is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $1,000.00 fine. They are going to be able to pretty much pin you to this accident, especially if there was a witness. The only thing I would advise is not to talk about alcohol consumption (if that is an issue) because they could try and enhance the charges. You should consult with an attorney, especially if your car has been impounded. You are eventually going to have to deal with these people.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein | Neal L. Weinstein
    Hire an attorney. They may try and charge you with Leaving the scene, failure to report an accident, driving to endanger, or driving while distracted, if you talk to them. Hire an attorney to represent you and get your truck back.
    Answer Applies to: Maine
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    You should deny speaking with the detectives and speak to an attorney immediately. Under the Fifth Amendment, you have a right to remain silent and not incriminate yourself.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    You should agree to talk to them about the accident. They will not have any evidence to charge you with a DUI, since you left your name and contact information, you should not be charged with failing to give information. If the damage is extensive, you are required to file an accident report, so they may try to charge you with leaving the scene of an accident without reporting. If you feel more comfortable with having an attorney go with you, then retain the services of an attorney prior to speaking with the investigator.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    This response is general information only and does not establish an attorney client relationship. However, you should hire an attorney if you get charged with anything or if just for questioning you want a lawyer to be there.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    You should consult with a criminal defense attorney in your local area to determine whether or not you may be facing criminal liability. An attorney will be able to advise you as to your rights and should definitely be consulted before you speak to the police so that you avoid incriminating yourself.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    Probably best for you to speak to a lawyer. You have to get the car out of impound because the impound fees are mounting. You could call them about getting the car bcck, but dont make any statements about the night in question.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    Hire an attorney! Do not speak to police without consulting with an attorney first. They are not there to assist you. If they wanted to help you, they would leave you alone and do something else. They are only trying to contact you to obtain evidence and it is probably evidence against you that they are seeking.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    What should I do if police want to question me? Retain our office to represent you at the questioning, because you may or may not want to answer their questions.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    I would seek the advise of a competent criminal defense attorney before doing anything. The police want to gain information, evidence, that you did something wrong.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Smith & John
    Smith & John | Kenneth Craig Smith, Jr.
    You should hire an attorney and let the attorney make the decision. Until then, you should not speak to them and should invoke your right to have an attorney present.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A.
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A. | Michael D. Fluke
    Never speak with law enforcement prior to consulting with an attorney. Rarely, if ever, do I let my clients speak with law enforcement. The standard course would be to have the attorney speak for you. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC
    Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC | Thomas A. Medford, Jr.
    In any conversations with the police you should tell the truth but it would be wise to speak with an attorney concerning your rights.
    Answer Applies to: District of Columbia
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    You can always refuse to talk with the police if you feel uncomfortable. Nobody ever has to talk to the police. You can also have an attorney present with you if you like. Keep in mind that it is unlikely that your statement will prevent a warrant from being issued for your arrest if the police are so inclined.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    It's your call. You don't have to talk to them but then you run the risk that they could decide to arrest you for some offense like hit and run. If you decide to talk to them remember that anything you say can and will be used against you. Often the best option in a situation like this is to hire an attorney to accompany you. It keeps the police from taking advantage of you while still technically satisfying their request to talk to you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    My best advice is to hire an attorney before doing anything further. An appropriate stategy can then be put into place based on the facts you describe. I would not suggest doing this on your own. Too much is at stake when it comes to potential charges and penalties.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You should retain an attorney, tell him everything that happened in detail...without lying or leaving anything out, and he will contact the police and try to keep you from being arrested. He can surrender you if necessary. You should have called a tow truck and waited outside the vehicle if you were drinking. Never talk to the police no matter what they promise or threaten. Fish only get caught when they open their mouth.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Michael J. Kennedy
    Never talk to the cops without counsel when they suspect you of crime. It never, ever helps, and almost always hurts.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    Do not speak with the police until you contact a lawyer. The cops want to speak with you for one purpose-to try and develop a criminal case against you. Let your lawyer deal with the police.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Hire an attorney to help you get the vehicle back and tell the cops you do not want to talk to them based on your 5th Amendment rights.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    The Law Office of James McKain
    The Law Office of James McKain | James McKain
    When in a pickle, plead the nickel. Let me be clear, police officers don't want to talk to you to "clear things up", they don't want you to do field sobriety tests to "make sure that you are ok to drive". They do these things to gather evidence against you. Practice this statement "I decline to answer ANY question as any answer I give may incriminate me. I demand to have my lawyer present during any interaction with the police". Use it often. Thank you,
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Thomas Baynton
    Law Office of Thomas Baynton | Thomas B Baynton
    Do not talk to the police. You should hire an attorney immediately. If you talk to the police you may make admissions which could lead to serious charges.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Offices of Christopher Jackson
    Law Offices of Christopher Jackson | Christopher L. Jackson
    You need to hire a lawyer to call the police for you. Remember anything you say can be used against you.
    Answer Applies to: Kentucky
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Never speak to police without your attorney present at all times. Remember you have the right to remain silent, so don't fall for their trick.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    LT Pepper Law
    LT Pepper Law | Luke T. Pepper
    I would hire an attorney or at the very minimum call the officer who contacted you to see what they want to talk to you about. They may have evidence that you were drinking. If so a consultation with an attorney would be a good idea.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    Tell them you would be glad to talk to them and they just have to call your lawyer to set that up!
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Hire an attorney. Never talk with the police without having conferred with counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
    I always advise people to not talk to the police. If you feel you have to talk to the police, hire a lawyer and take him with you. I would immediately begin the administrative procedure to get your car out of impound. The impound fees add up fast and can cost you a fortune. Call me, I can help you with this.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Michael Brodsky
    Law Office of Michael Brodsky | Michael Brodsky
    Any lawyer worth his salt** will tell the suspect in no uncertain terms to make no statements to police under any circumstances. *This was good advice then and it remains true today. Answering the questions of law enforcement rarely helps your case and often provides officers with the evidence they need to bring charges. At the very least, you should consult an attorney before making ay statements to the police.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    Eventually, you will have to contact the police, at least to get your truck. Since you left note, you did your duty. But, police like to threaten people with additional charges etc if they do not talk. I suggest having an attorney contact the police for you. If you cannot afford this, call and listen, do not talk. Tell the police that you do not want to answer any questions until you have an attorney. Ask how to get your truck back. They may want to meet you to give you a ticket or arrest you. Make sure you are ready for that. Get it over with. An attorney can help with this process. Do not talk to police or even tell them you were driving, who you were with, where you were coming from or going to.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Politely decline to answer any questions other than filling out an accident report. Contact PD to set up a meeting to retrieve your truck. In the report you provide indicate you were distracted and inadvertently went off the road. You did not believe there was any damage to report and simply left your number and went home.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
    I would recommend you invoke your right to remain silent.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Hire your lawyer first before any police involvement. You left the scene and failed to report a property damage accident, both crimes.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Bruce H. Lehr, P.A.
    Bruce H. Lehr, P.A. | Bruce H. Lehr
    No matter how innocent you NEVER talk to police without an attorney present.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    Hire a lawyer and take the lawyers advise about whether to talk to them.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
    Sounds like you will be charged with hit and run (even though you left a note). I would not advise you to only talk to police if a lawyer, after talking to the officer himself, determines that it may help lower your charges to something like careless driving. Usually, when you talk to police, you are just helping them build a better case against yourself.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Braunstein Law, PC
    Braunstein Law, PC | Jacob Braunstein
    The safest course of action is to have an attorney present with you for any questioning, if you decide to consent to questioning.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Sean Patrick Walsh
    Law Office of Sean Patrick Walsh | Sean Patrick Walsh
    Consult with an attorney and have the attorney fax a letter to the cops asserting your 5th and 6th Amendment rights. I have done this numerous times for clients, and it is always best to consult with an attorney prior to speaking with the police.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    Hire a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Castleberry & Elison
    Castleberry & Elison | Peter Castleberry
    Do not, under any circumstances, speak to the police. The police may attempt to personally serve you with a criminal citation and complaint. If this occurs, do not talk to the police and immediately call a lawyer. If the police arrest you, do not say anything: exercise your constitutional right to remain silent and contact an attorney as soon as possible.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law | Eric James Schurman
    Do not speak to the police. It would be wise to have an attorney speak on your behalf and get your truck back. Feel free to call me to discuss further.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Steven C. Bullock
    Contact an attorney immediately and have him/her contact the police. Under no circumstances do you contact the police or even worse ..provide them (the police) a statement. The police cannot hold your car ransom either. Good luck!-
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas | Thomas Ogas
    What benefit is it to you to speak to them? Think about it. The only time it makes sense to make a statement is when that statement will result in the police dropping a case, or looking at a new suspect. And you need to be fairly sure of that result before you make the statement. You need to consult a lawyer and tell them exactly what happened. The lawyer can then tell you if you should talk to the police or not. But as a general rule, when in doubt, dont give a statement to the police.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman | Gabriel Dorman
    Immediately hire a criminal defense attorney to represent you. Nothing good can come from you actually speaking with the police at this point. Anything you say can and WILL be used against you if there is a criminal proceeding that comes out of this. However, an experienced criminal defense attorney can speak on your behalf and also help you avoid criminal charges if possible. You should act fast so your lawyer can try to get ahead of this. I hope this answer was helpful. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    We recommend that you retain a criminal defense attorney ASAP to discuss your rights and options, including your attorney making inquiries on your behalf. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Donahue, Sowa & Magana Attorneys at Law
    Donahue, Sowa & Magana Attorneys at Law | Glenn M. Sowa
    Where did this occur? How long has it been since the "accident"? Call me at the number listed below tomorrow to discuss it in more detail.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    What can you do? Hire an attorney, unless you know how to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor intending to convict you on hit and run. No amount of free 'tips and hints' from here or anywhere else are going to effectively help you in your defense, other than the advice to exercise the 5th Amendment right to SHUT UP and do NOT talk to ANYONE about the case except an attorney. That includes on this or any other web site or public forum. Most police and prosecutors will happily tell you that 95% of people convict themselves by trying to be 'helpful and cooperative', either during initial contact, questioning, interview or interrogation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Potter Law Offices
    Potter Law Offices | Cal J. Potter, III, Esq.
    You have the right to remain silent. Therefore you can simply state that I choose to remain silent.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    As a general rule if you are being investigated by the police you should exercise your right to remain silent and should not give them a statement. You should have your attorney contact the police on your behalf. Based on the facts presented, you could be charged with Negligent Driving. If you left the scene of an accident which resulted in damage to property and your failed to leave sufficient identifying information, you could be charged with Hit and Run. If the police have sufficient evidence that you had been been drinking and were impaired, you could be charged with DUI.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    I would not talk with them if I were you. I would hire a lawyer to represent me. You have no obligation to answer any questions they pose but you will feel much pressure to answer them if you are in their presence. It is possible that you did cause some damage and they will want to charge you with failure to stop and give information. They cannot charge you with DWI at this point because there is no evidence.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Talking to investigators is risky business. They think you committed the crime of Hit and Run and possibly DUI. My best advice is to remain silent. Any admission you make is admissible in court and would be used against you potentially. The other thing is police officers are investigators; that's part of their job. They spend weeks in law enforcement academies learning to question suspects and witnesses. Also, they are taught to detect deception. Some officers attend the Reid Interviewing Technique class and learn to be human lie detectors. The other thing a good investigator will do is take what sounds to you to be an innocent response, and twist it to get you talking. As a prosecutor, I sent plenty of people to jail based on "telling their side of the story" don't do it! By contrast, you can tell your lawyer anything and your lawyer can relate the basic facts to the cops. His or her statements can't be used against you. As far as getting your vehicle out of impound, it is currently evidence. There is a one-year Statute of Limitations on DUI and Hit and Run so theoretically, the authorities can hold onto it that long. However, you have every right to go to court to protest the impound and the court has the authority to make the police release your vehicle. Again, a lawyer would be a great help in this situation. Since you left a note on your vehicle, you may have a technical defense to hit and run. Again. You should explore that in detail with an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Tell them you want a lawyer and if they still want to talk to you with your lawyer present then you can either politely decline or hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Do not talk to them.They just want you to admit that you were driving and they will charge you with at least leaving the scene of an accident.Get an attorney. They can't keep your car forever.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Nichols Law Firm
    Nichols Law Firm | Michael J. Nichols
    do NOT answer the questions. Politely decline. Seek counsel from a qualified lawyer immediately.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Correia-Champa & Mailhot
    Correia-Champa & Mailhot | Susan Correia Champa
    I would speak to an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Offices of James A Bates
    Law Offices of James A Bates | James A Bates
    You have a constitutional right to remain silent. Your response should be, "I respectfully decline to answer your questions on advice of counsel." They will get mad and yell but hold your ground. They cannot ask you any questions once you say you wish to remain silent. One exception....you must tell them what test you prefer to take, breath or blood. Taking the test won't help the prosecution because you may have had several drinks AFTER you got home.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    If you decide to speak to them, consult an attorney and have one present with you while speaking to the police.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
    If the police suspect you of a crime, you do not have to speak to them. Invoke your rights and hire an attorney to represent you quickly.
    Answer Applies to: Hawaii
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Since there is no way to establish that you were or were not drinking it should not be a problem. I would not say I was answering my phone (illegal while driving) but that something distracted you. That should be the end of it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    San Diego DUI Law Center
    San Diego DUI Law Center | Rick Mueller
    Do not speak to them. You don't have to.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi | Rodney Nosratabadi
    Say nothing. Tell them to contact my attorney. Phrase call me at 714-955-8365 to discuss further. Sent from my Android phone with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Attorney Paul Lancia
    Attorney Paul Lancia | Paul Lancia
    Get a lawyer and let the lawyer deal w the police.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    It is never a good idea to speak to the police without a lawyer. I would suggest you hire a lawyer and let him do the talking. Anything you say can and will be used against you.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    Retain an attorney. It would not be possible for the police to show you were intoxicated at the time of the accident (unless the person who gave you a read said you appeared to be) so be sure not to make any admissions. In fact, you should invoke your right to remain silent. The police likely can't prove you were intoxicated and you left your contact information. Vehicle and Traffic Law technically requires that you provide more information than you left but it would be hard to imagine being arrested for it unless the cops want to stick it to you and I don't think the DA would like the case. The key to me is to retain an attorney to speak to the police and see where they are heading. The above is for informational purposes only and not meant as legal advice.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    The Law Firm of David Jolly
    The Law Firm of David Jolly | David Jolly
    Simple but effective advise: Do Not Talk to the Police until you have consulted with a lawyer! The only reason the police wish to talk with you is to determine whether a crime or infraction has been committed. If you cannot speak to an attorney politely decline the police officer's request. Again, do not speak to the police as there is no obligation for you to do so.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Leyba Defense, PLLC
    Leyba Defense, PLLC | Matthew Leyba
    Don't talk with the police.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
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