What should I do if a police detective wants to talk to me? 15 Answers as of April 19, 2013

I am being accused of a crime. The police detective wants me to go into the police station and talk to him. What should I do? I cannot afford an attorney and its stressing me out. What should I do if a police detective wants to talk to me?

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The Rogers Law Firm
The Rogers Law Firm | Andrea Storey Rogers
My advice is don't go speak to the detective without an attorney present with you. The only reason the police want to speak to you is because they don't have enough evidence yet to convict someone of a crime and they're hoping that by interrogating you, they will get you to confess. Call the local law school legal clinics or the public defender's office and see if you can find someone to represent you for free or at a low cost.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 4/19/2013
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
If you are being accused of a crime, you should not speak to the police without an attorney present. The best advise I can give you is to find a way to hire an attorney, even if you have to borrow the money.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/19/2013
Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
Do not talk. If the police have enough, they will arrest you. IF not, then you do not want to help them.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 4/19/2013
Barton Barton & Plotkin
Barton Barton & Plotkin | Maurice Ross
You should not talk to the detective. You should exercise your right to be silent. You say you cannot afford an attorney. But you need an attorney ASAP. You should raise the money from your family or friends because failure to retain counsel in a situation can be disastrous.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 4/18/2013
William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
Remember that anything that you say alright might be used in evidence against you. An experienced criminal defense attorney can help you determine whether it might be in your best interest to speak or not to speak. An attorney can assist you with evaluating the prosecution's case, any defenses that you might have, and any plea offer that might be made, so that you can decide whether to plea bargain or go to trial. If you were to be found guilty, then an attorney can assist you with presenting mitigation, allocution, and a recommendation for a more lenient sentence. and a recommendation for a more lenient sentence.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 4/18/2013
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    DO NOT TALK TO HIM. He is just trying to get a confession so that his job is easier. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT. If they make threats about arrest or other things tell them to go ahead. DO NOT TALK They WILL USE YOUR WORDS AGAINST YOU. Maybe 20% of the criminals in jail and prison would be out if they had NOT talked.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey | Michael E. Dailey
    Get a lawyer .A court will usually only appoint a lawyer for you after you have been arrested and charged with a crime and before you post any bond.. You may the chance to avoid that happening with legal counsel now.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    If you are being accused of a crime, it is definitely not in your best interest to talk to a cop.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    You have no obligation to speak with the police. You have a constitutional right to remain silent. If a police officer wishes to speak with you, you can assume that his purpose is to build a case against you through your own statements. Any defense attorney will advise you against talking to the police, at least without first conferring with an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, apply for public defense. If you qualify, an attorney will be appointed to represent you.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    You do not have to talk with the police. Inform the police that you are invoking your Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination and will remain silent.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    Law Office of John G. Galasso | John George Galasso
    I would not speak to the police without a lawyer present under any circumstances; If the think they have enough evidence to charge you, they will; Once your charged you have a right to a court appointed attorney to defend you in court;
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    Natty Shafer Law
    Natty Shafer Law | Nathaniel Shafer
    Do not agree to talk to the detective. He cannot make you talk. Simply tell him you do not wish to speak to him and then end the conversation.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    Conway Law Pllc.
    Conway Law Pllc. | B. L. Conway
    See my essay to criminal defendants @ www.conwayattorneys.com.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Do NOT speak to the police, state you are going to remain silent until your have an attorney. Also, if you have any ability at all, hire your own counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/18/2013
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    You must not fall for this trap. Don't you see it is set up? Ever heard of the right to remain silent?
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/18/2013
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