What should I do if my creditors have already started garnishing my wages? 36 Answers as of July 02, 2013

I have a lot of bills to pay, but my creditors have already garnished my wages and attached my bank accounts to various debts I owe. How can I get them to stop doing this and how do I take care of everything?

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Mercado & Hartung, PLLC
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC | Christopher J. Mercado
BK is an option and will cause the release of the garnishment. Contact a local attorney for specifics.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 3/5/2012
Marc S. Stern
Marc S. Stern | Marc S. Stern
Sounds like bankruptcy is the only way to stop all of this.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 2/20/2012
Ipson Law Firm, PLLC
Ipson Law Firm, PLLC | Michael Ipson
Filing for bankruptcy will stop the wage garnishment and bank account garnishments. You should contact an attorney to help you with this.
Answer Applies to: Utah
Replied: 2/20/2012
Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall
Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall | William M. Rubendall
If you file for bankruptcy it automatically stops garnishments and levies.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/17/2012
Philip R. Boardman, Attorney at Law
Philip R. Boardman, Attorney at Law | Phil Boardman
You can file bankruptcy which will stop the garnishments.
Answer Applies to: Virginia
Replied: 2/17/2012
    Yahima Suarez, A Law Firm, PL | YAHIMA SUAREZ
    You may have some defenses to garnishment. For example, are you head of household, do you make little money a month and you dependents, is your bank account co-owned with another person who also deposits monies into this account? You may have these and other defenses against garnishment. Sometimes, you may still be able to come to a payment plan with the creditor in terms that may work for you. If nothing else work, maybe you should look into filing bankruptcy. I would recommend you speak to an experienced attorney in bankruptcy law that can go over the details of your case and tell you if you qualify for a bankruptcy, hopefully a chapter 7 and if this would be the best option for you.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    Benson Law Firm
    Benson Law Firm | David Benson
    You can file a skeleton petition ASAP to invoke the automatic stay and discontinue any further garnishments.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis | Eric Lewis
    Sounds like bankruptcy might be a good solution for you to take care of your overwhelming debt the garnishment and frozen bank accounts.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    File a chapter 7 bankruptcy and the garnishing will stop and they will have to unfreeze your bank accounts. You should see an attorney immediately and come in for a consultation so we can discuss.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    Steven Harrell, Attorney at Law | Waymon Steven Harrell
    You need to file a bankruptcy case. That would stop any garnishments that are now pending against you.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    J.M. Cook, P.A. | J.M. Cook
    In NC, a creditor can't garnish your wages. If you are in a jurisdiction that allows for garnishment, you could file bankruptcy to discharge the debt.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    CS Hansley Law Firm | Chris Hansley
    Filing bankruptcy will stop the garnishments and discharge all allowable debts.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    Law Offices of Michael J. Berger
    Law Offices of Michael J. Berger | Michael J. Berger
    Filing bankruptcy will stop wage garnishments and bank levies. Filing bankruptcy may be the best option for you. Talk to a certified specialist in bankruptcy law ASAP.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    Kenneth A. Parker, P.C.
    Kenneth A. Parker, P.C. | Ken Parker
    A Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy can stop a garnishment immediately. Talk to a Bankruptcy Attorney to get the full details.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 2/16/2012
    THOMAS G. GILL, P.A. | Thomas G Gill
    The wage garnishment will stop as soon as you file bankruptcy. In addition, you may be able to recoup the money garnished from your wages within 90 days of your filing.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Bereliani Law Firm | Sanaz Sarah Bereliani
    File for bankruptcy ASAP. You will get garnished 25% of your post tax deduction income every pay period until you file Bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Law Office of Louis S. Haskell
    Law Office of Louis S. Haskell | Louis Haskell
    The good news is that the mere act of filing for bankruptcy protection will stop the wage attachments (you need to notify your employer), and will stop everything else that has happened in state court. The attachments on your bank accounts will also be lifted, although that may require filing a motion with the Bankruptcy Court. Without filing bankruptcy it is doubtful that you can stop the attachments. Short of simply paying the debt, you would either have to convince the creditor to release the attachment voluntarily, or convince the judge who allowed the attachment to void it. Both are unlikely scenarios.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Gregory J. Wald, Attorney at Law
    Gregory J. Wald, Attorney at Law | Gregory J. Wald
    A bankruptcy case will stop garnishment immediately when it is filed with the court and reported to the creditors.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    Retain a lawyer to file bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Bird & VanDyke, Inc.
    Bird & VanDyke, Inc. | David VanDyke
    File Bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/2/2013
    Guardian Law Group PLLC
    Guardian Law Group PLLC | C. David Hester
    Filing BK will put an immediately stay on all collection including garnishments.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    James Branum Law
    James Branum Law | James Branum
    Based on the limited information you have shared with me, the quickest way to stop a garnishment is to file bankruptcy immediately. As soon as you file, the automatic stay kicks in and prevents future garnishments. I would strongly urge you to call a bankruptcy lawyer today. If you can get your case filed before your next pay check, you may be able to stop them from garnishing that check!
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Heupel Law
    Heupel Law | Kevin Heupel
    Bankruptcy is going to be your best solution. Right now, the creditor can take 25% of your wages until the debt is paid. Bankruptcy will get you out of the debt, and once you file the bankruptcy, it will stop the wage garnishment.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Judith A. Runyon, Esq. Attorney at Law
    Judith A. Runyon, Esq. Attorney at Law | Judith A. Runyon
    File a bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/20/2013
    Law Office of David P. Farrell
    Law Office of David P. Farrell | David Farrell
    There isn't much you can do to stop a creditor from garnishing your wages. How much of your wages can be garnished depends upon applicable state law exemptions. Generally speaking, in California, a creditor can garnish 25% of your wages. Certain exceptions do apply, where, for example, a portion of the debtor's wages are already subject to an order for support. Filing bankruptcy will stop the garnishment and the garnishing creditor will be forced to accept the same treatment as all other similarly situated creditors in the bankruptcy proceeding. If the debt giving rise to the garnishment is dischargeable in bankruptcy, upon entry of an order of discharge by the court the creditor and its successors in interest will be permanently enjoined from attempting to collect the debt.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    AyerHoffman, LLP
    AyerHoffman, LLP | David C. Ayer
    You should consult with a bankruptcy and debt relief attorney to determine what course of action is best for you. If your debts are great enough, bankruptcy may be the best option. The type of bankruptcy will depend upon your assets and your income.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Bordeaux Law, P.C.
    Bordeaux Law, P.C. | Clifford Bordeaux
    A bankruptcy filing would stop the garnishment. You should contact a bankruptcy attorney to see if bankruptcy is an option for you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    The Law Office of Gary Polston | Gary Polston
    If you are eligible to file Bankruptcy, this can stop the wage garnishments as soon as notification is given to the creditor.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
    File for bankruptcy protection now.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/20/2013
    Diefer Law Group, P.C.
    Diefer Law Group, P.C. | Abel Fernandez
    Your best option might be to file for bankruptcy so you can stop the wage garnishment. The other alternative might be to seek an exemption in order to reduce what they take out of your wages but I believe you are too late for that option. That, normally has to happen prior to the garnishment commencing.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Ursula G. Barrios Law
    Ursula G. Barrios Law | Guillermo Machado
    You should file bankruptcy immediately to stop the garnishment and eliminate your debts.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Moore Taylor & Thomas PA
    Moore Taylor & Thomas PA | Jane Downey
    We don't have wage garnishment in SC.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    The Schreiber Law Firm
    The Schreiber Law Firm | Jeffrey D. Schreiber
    Either 1) continue to allow them to do so, 2) file a hardship exemption on the garnishments if the amount being taken in wage garnishments affects you ability to live, 3) make payment arrangements (which most creditors will require at least as much as they are receiving form the wage garnishment) or 4) file bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    The Law Offices of Kristy Qiu
    The Law Offices of Kristy Qiu | Mengjun Qiu
    You might want to consider bankruptcy. The moment you file for bankruptcy, the creditors will have to stop garnishing your wages and the liens on your bank accounts will be gone.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    Law Office of Michael Johnson
    Law Office of Michael Johnson | Michael Johnson
    You can file a bankruptcy and stop the garnishment.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/15/2012
    The Smalley Law Firm, LLC | Cary Smalley
    Filing for bankruptcy will put an automatic stay into effect which will prevent your creditors from garnishing your wages from the date of filing on.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 2/15/2012
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