What should I do if I dont have anyone representing me for my court case? 40 Answers as of May 25, 2011

I have a court date coming up very soon I missed my appointment with the public defender, I called them to reschedule they told me to call the court for approval to reschedule. I called they would not give the public defenders office permission to do so. Therefore I have no one representing for my court case, and the court clerk said I might be put in jail with 1000.00 bail for missing my appointment what can I do?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
Make sure you don't miss the next court date or a warrant will issue for your arrest. I cannot speak to how the PD's office works. If you want to ensure you have an attorney, you can hire one. You will NOT be put in jail for missing your appointment with your attorney!
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/25/2011
Beaulier Law Office
Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
Contact the public defender's office again and request that a Public Defender be assigned. If one is not assigned, you may seek the appointment of a public defender while at your court hearing. You may also wish to consider hiring private counsel.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 5/24/2011
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
I would need further information like why is the public defender not representing you. Missing an appoint is not the same as missing a court appearance, so the public defender should still be obligated to represent you unless the court relieves him as your attorney for your lack of cooperation. But if you have a good reason for missing the appointment and tried to reschedule and the court did not relieve him as your attorney he should still be representing you.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 5/24/2011
Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
I am certain there is a miscommunication somewhere. You cannot be jailed for missing an appointment with your lawyer, even if it is a public defender. You can be jailed for missing court. So, based on your question there is a miscommunication. You must appear for the court setting, even if you do not manage to meet with your lawyer first. Call your lawyer, find out when you have to be in court (assuming that is not what you already missed) and be there. If you missed a Court date, prepare for the worst, but it is a lot better if you take care of it sooner rather than later and call your bondsman and let him or her help you, if they will.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 5/23/2011
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
First, what you've outlined sounds very harsh, but it can happen that way. I suggest you go back to the Public Defender's office and insist they postpone your case for a week or two and/or recall the Warrant that may be outstanding for you and interview you and then handle your case for you. Even if you simply show up for court, the PD's office will handle your case as long as you qualify financially for their help. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    I would recommend consulting with and retaining a private attorney to handle your matter. If you are in Los Angeles, Ventura, San Bernardino or Orange County, feel free to contact me to discuss your case in more detail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    This is nonsense. If you are charged with a misdemeanor or more serious offense, you are entitled to court appointed counsel if you cannot afford to hire an attorney. Missing an appointment is not a basis for not appointing counsel. Showing up for court when you are out is a reason to remain out.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    LynchLaw
    LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
    You have three choices. You can make what I would consider to be the poor choice, to continue to fail to appear. You can hire private counsel and have them make the appearance for you. Or you can place yourself onto the court calendar with the criminal clerks office and ask the court to re-approve your appointment with the Public Defender.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    Go to court, tell the judge what caused you to miss your appointment, and ask the court to reappoint the public defender to your case. Alternatively, you could consult with a private attorney and retain his services before you come back to court.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    You can always represent yourself, but it is best to hire a lawyer if you cannot get a public defender. Perhaps you can show up and request additional time.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    You have the right to hire an attorney of your own choice and you might consider doing so.If you are unable to hire counsel, and you go to Court without counsel, request on the date that your case is set to have an appointed attorney represent you. The Court may be willing to provide counsel for you.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    Hire a private attorney as soon as possible, is the best advice I can give you. I do not understand why you were told you are facing a 1000 dollar bail, for missing an appointment with the public defender. Usually, if you missed a court date, you would be facing that, if you turned yourself into the court. If you would like to discuss this further with me, so I can get a better idea of what exactly you are talking about, feel free to call me for a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    Appear as required by the court and explain the circumstances. You will be provided counsel. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    You will need to try to hire private counsel if you cannot get set up with a public defender. If you are seeking representation in Louisiana, contact our firm at the information on this page for a free case evaluation to discuss your options.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    It sounds like you did not qualify for assigned counsel, so you must retain private counsel. If you would like to discuss that with our office we can be reached toll free for a no obligation, no cost phone consultation.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    Show up and court and have a good reason for missing your appointment with public defender and if they give you another chance don't blow it again!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/23/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    We are criminal defense attorneys in Augusta, GA. You might want to talk with family and friends about retaining a criminal lawyer to help you. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    Typically, a person accused of a crime punishable by at least 93 days in jail has the right to be represented by an attorney at ever stage of the court proceeding. However, the accused has some obligations too. Why did you miss your appointment? If there was a valid excuse, it should be explained to the Court. Otherwise, it appears you have two options. First, you could hire your own attorney. Second, make another request of the Court for court appointed counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    If you are at risk of being put in jail, you have the right to have an attorney appointed at state expense if you cannot afford one. However, if the offense is one where you will not go to jail, perhaps because the judge simply is not going to put you in jail, then you do not have a right to demand an attorney at state expense. The matter of bond is another issue. The Court will set an appropriate bond. Failure to appear at Court hearings is a reason for setting a higher bond. If you missed Court when you were to obtain your court appointed attorney, this can be a basis for setting a higher bond. The better solution right now is to retain your own attorney, if possible. Otherwise, your missing the appointment has placed you in a bad position with the Court, and you will have to wait until the Court date to see how it plays out.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    You should probably retain private counsel, if possible. If you missed your court date, there might be a warrant out for your arrest. Contact an attorney to verify whether or not a warrant is outstanding. If so, he/she will then make arrangements for a surrender. If there is no warrant, you will still need representation on the case. Unfortunately, your public defender does not appear to be as available as needed. Advice: Protect your interests, and contact a lawyer as soon as possible.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Hire a private attorney or risk the consequences. Never good to represent yourself.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Lisa Mulligan Law Offices, LLC
    Lisa Mulligan Law Offices, LLC | Lisa Mulligan
    This is a very confusing situation - usually a missed appointment with a public defender is just rescheduled, so I'm wondering if maybe you accidentally missed a court date? Since you can't seem to get a clear answer from the court or the public defender's office, you might want to consider calling a private attorney in your area to try to get more information about your circumstances.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Justin Jones Attorney at Law, PLLC
    Justin Jones Attorney at Law, PLLC | Justin Blaine Jones
    You need to find an attorney to represent you. Your attorney will have a better chance of explaining your circumstances to the Judge and prosecutor. It's not good that you missed your appointment, but it's not too late to hire someone to help you.
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    Was this for a meeting with your lawyer or a court date? The court can only sanction your or put you in jail for missing a court date. If you have a good excuse for missing the court date, the court will probably quash the bench warrant that was probably issued, but your lawyer will have to help you with this.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts | Andrew Stephen Roberts
    You should go to the clerk's office and ask that your matter be put on calendar. Explain to the Judge what happened. Ask for a re-referral to Public Defender.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Law Office of Joseph A. Katz
    Law Office of Joseph A. Katz | Joseph A. Katz
    I do not understand the procedure in your County. That makes no sense to me. So, though you are eligible for the Public Defender in the first place, failing to appear makes you suddenly more financially secure? Perhaps the Court is simply requiring that you personally appear to explain the circumstances of your failing to report to the Public Defender, which was apparently an order from the Court to determine your eligibility?I have never heard of a Public Defender's Office or a County using such a procedure. I really wonder what County you live within. Regardless, you need to appear in Court and face the music. Ask the Court to reappoint the Public Defender. Or, hire an Attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Hire an attorney and have a good explanation for why you failed to appear. Whether they will or will not make you pay bail depends on two considerations. The first issue is whether you are a danger to the community. That is determined by your criminal history and the seriousness of your conduct in your current case. The second consideration is whether you present a flight risk. Stated another way, the court will look at your past traffic record for failures to appear (FTA) and your bench warrant history. You might also see if your public defender will represent you at that hearing. At the very least, he or she should be given written notice. Other than that, dress nicely for court and be deferential towards the judge and prosecutor. Please feel free to contact me should you have and questions or concerns.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
    A private attorney can represent you if you are unable to attend court. When you hire a private attorney you know which attorney is representing you. When you have the public defender's office, it could be a random attorney who has never seen or spoken with you. Hire a private attorney quickly.
    Answer Applies to: Hawaii
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You do not need to meet with your public defender in advance, just call and let hem know you will be in court. They can interview you on the phone. You will have time to talk to your lawyer in court and get an adjournment to investigate the case or talk to the prosecutor about a plea deal. All you have to do is call the lawyer and show up in court dressed in a suit and tie with your hair combed and your parents if you are under 21.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Time to hire a private lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    Make sure you make your court appearance. It is the court appearance that is really important. I can't answer as to your problems with the public defender, that is an issue between you and them. If you hire a private lawyer, then things are handled differently, but if you qualify for a public defender, you may not be able to afford private counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Just go to court on the day you were supposed to. Come up with a good excuse as to why you missed the appointment and what you have done to get the P.D. to see you again.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    If you go to court and ask for a court appointed lawyer they will put you in contact with the public defender in that court. If your income qualify for a public defender they will represent you. I if you don't qualify then the court will give you time to hire a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Go to court as ordered and ask the judge again.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    Have you had any prior continuances? Why did you miss the meeting with the public defender? Depending on the answers to those questions, it is not likely you'll be arrested for not making the public defender meeting. It is most likely the judge will give you another chance to meet with them, or will set the case for a trial and have you tell the public defender that have to be ready by that date.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
    Based on the procedure you have described and the amount of bail involved, I would guess you are charged with a misdemeanor. If you are charged with a misdemeanor, most courts of limited jurisdiction have regular calendars in which they will decide whether to quash or serve a warrant. The longer you to wait to get on such a calendar the greater the chance the warrant will not be quashed so call the court and get on their warrant calendar ASAP.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/20/2011
    Scott & Huggins Law Offices
    Scott & Huggins Law Offices | Ryan Scott
    Did you miss an office visit with your attorney or an actual court appearance? If you missed an actual court appearance, sometimes appearing in court with retained counsel can indicate to the court your seriousness in taking care of the charges. The thinking goes, if he has hired an attorney, then he's not going to waste all that money by missing another court date. Whether that is sufficient to keep you out of custody will depend on your criminal record, your history (or lack) of non-appearance and the nature of the charges. Alternatively, it sounds like your court appointed attorney may have withdrawn from your case due to lack of contact. If so, the same general rule applies: appearing with retained counsel can indicate to the court your intention to deal with the charges responsibly. But there is no guarantee what will happen in the courtroom.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/20/2011
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 4 5 6 7 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney