What should I do if I am being harassed by creditors after receiving a Chapter 7 discharge? 18 Answers as of October 07, 2014

I believe the creditors and debts in question were correctly identified in the schedules. Should I just gently bring the discharge to their attention?

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Freeman Law Group, LLC
Freeman Law Group, LLC | Derek Freeman
If you included these creditors on your petition, they should have received notice of the bankruptcy and the discharge. You should notify them of the discharge, and provide them with a copy of the discharge order (certified mail, return receipt). If they continue to harass you, sue them for discharge violation. But get a lawyer first.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 10/7/2014
A Fresh Start
A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
No need to be gentle about it. Notify the offending creditors that they are violating the bankruptcy discharge & that you understand you have the right to sue for damages for any violation of the bankruptcy discharge.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 10/1/2014
Law Offices of Linda Rose Fessler | Linda Fessler
Send them the Notice of filing BK along with the discharge.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/1/2014
Ronald K. Nims LLC | Ronald K. Nims
Send them a certified or Fedex letter telling them that they're debt was discharged in bankruptcy and that you will sue them if they continue to harass you.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 9/30/2014
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
If they were identified in the bankruptcy schedules correctly then you can reopen your case and file for a discharge violation.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 9/30/2014
    Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
    Bring the discharge to their attention and if they persist you file a motion for an order to show cause with the bankruptcy court.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    D.J. Rausa, Attorney at Law | D.J. Rausa
    Send them a copy of your discharge.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
    Send a certified letter return receipt with a copy if the discharge. Keep a copy and keep the receipt. When you get dunned again see a lawyer who handles fair debt collection practices act cases.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C.
    GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C. | Richard N. Gonzales
    Give them the case number, the date of filing, and the date of discharge. If they persist, go back to your BK attorney. There are State & Federal Laws that protect you from this kind of conduct. These laws provide for the payment of attorney fees by the parties breaking these laws.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Law Office of Marlin Branstetter
    Law Office of Marlin Branstetter | Marlin Branstetter
    Bring the discharge to their attention-there is no need to be gentle about it, they are breaking the law. Also notify the United States Trustee (not the bankruptcy trustee) about creditor abuse.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Paul Stuber, Attorney at Law
    Paul Stuber, Attorney at Law | Paul Stuber
    You could remind them that federal law prohibits them from any further collection. Sometimes there are so many involved in collection efforts with a creditor that they do not all get the information. You should only have to remind them once.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    C Page Hamrick Attorney at Law | C Page Hamrick
    Keep a record of each contact by a creditor after bankruptcy. Send each creditor contacting you a copy of the Discharge Order.
    Answer Applies to: West Virginia
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Patrick W. Currin, Attorney at Law | Patrick Currin
    Mail them a copy of your discharge. If the debts were pre-filing they are discharged even if not listed if omitted in good faith.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Yes, and no need to be gentle.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Kenneth A. Parker, P.C.
    Kenneth A. Parker, P.C. | Ken Parker
    Yes. You can send them a copy of your discharge. If they continue harassing you after you inform them of your discharge, you can reopen your case and bring a violation of the bankruptcy stay action before the Bankruptcy Judge.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Law Office of Stuart M. Nachbar, P.C.
    Law Office of Stuart M. Nachbar, P.C. | Stuart M. Nachbar
    Gently.. I would not be gentle. I would give them a copy and if they fail to cease and desist, I would take it to the Bankruptcy Court and have them sanctioned.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Steele, George, Schofield & Ramos, LLP
    Steele, George, Schofield & Ramos, LLP | Alan E. Ramos
    I would send them a letter, certified - return-receipt, along with a copy of the discharge order. If they continue, you should contact an attorney to take them to court for violating the discharge injunction.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/30/2014
    Rosenberg & Press
    Rosenberg & Press | Max L. Rosenberg
    If you are being harassed by creditors or debt collectors schedule on your bankruptcy petition, you have an actionable claim against them for damages. In Connecticut we have the CCCPA which protects you from the unscrupulous actions of creditor and you are also protected by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) which protects you from third party debt collectors. What you need to do is bring these issues to a consumer law firm that handles these types of cases like Rosenberg and Press 203.870.6700, and allow them to do what they do best and make you money. Some consumer firms like ours do not even charge you any money as these are mostly fee shifting statutes which means that the creditor or debt collector pays your attorney fees. You may be entitle to as much as one thousand dollars paid to you for each account that they violate as well. So don't wast any time, keep a diary of dates, times, names and what was said and we can help you!
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 9/30/2014
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