What is the punishment for shoplifting? 85 Answers as of August 08, 2011

I was caught shoplifting at a Barnes and Noble. The total was $160 dollars. I have a court date, and want to know what i should expect in terms of punishment. I'm 19 and have no previous offenses

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Night Life Lawyers
Night Life Lawyers | Joshua Aldabbagh
You could be convicted of larceny, a misdemeanor, and be forced to pay a fine and/or do community service, pay restitution to the store, attend classes, etc. You should speak to an attorney, who may be able to help you avoid a conviction.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/8/2011
Lowenstein Law Office
Lowenstein Law Office | Anthony Lowenstein
It depends on several factors.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/4/2011
Boske Law Offices
Boske Law Offices | Michael A Boske
Up to 6 months in jail and a $1,000 fine.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 8/1/2011
Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
Shop lifting is a gross misdemeanor, punishable by a maximum of 1 year in jail and a $5,000.00 fine. How much the judge imposes will depend in large part upon your criminal history. If this is your first offense, there probably will be no jail time. If you have had multiple offenses, then expect to do some jail time.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 7/30/2011
Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
In Orange County, you may be eligible for a theft diversion program. Your case could be dismissed after successful completion of the program.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/30/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    The punishment for a 1st offense shoplifting charge is a fine. There is no jail time under the statute. However, the punishment is only part of the problem. The more important issue is having a criminal record. If you can afford it, you should hire a criminal defense attorney. I know it is a lot of money to hire an attorney, not just for a 19 year old, but for anyone. But if you possibly can, you should. With clients like yourself, young and no previous record (CORI) I try to do everything possible to keep you from getting a conviction on your record, even if it is only a fine. Somewhere down the road you will apply for a job or financial aid, or some sort of license and they will ask, "Have you ever been convicted of a crime?" You really want to be able to answer NO to that question. Your criminal history stays with you for life and even the smallest blemish can have consequences far beyond the fine that the court may impose. Even if you were caught red handed there are still many things a lawyer can do to avoid a conviction. If you want to discuss this in more detail, there is not fee for the telephone consultation. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may quality for a court appointed attorney. Some of these attorneys are very good. Others are not. If you can afford your own lawyer, hire one. If not, at least see if you qualify for a court appointed lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Rudolph F. X. Migliore, P. C.
    Rudolph F. X. Migliore, P. C. | Rudolph F. X. Migliore
    Depending on the county where this took place, different prosecutors have various policies regarding shoplifting. In Suffolk county, it is common for somebody in your situation to be offered to attend the stop-lift program and then be granted an adjournment on contemplation of dismissal. You may also find that the district attorney may require that you perform some community service hours prior to offering you a plea bargain. You will also be contacted by a collection agency demanding 3x the value of the item as compensation for the act. These collection agencies are vary aggressive and intimidating. However, they are often out of state and only make a limited effort toward collecting on the case.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    Fine, possibly probation (jail is possible but not likely), requirement to pay restitution if requested by business or prosecutor.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    The typical offer for a first offense is an adjournment and eventual dismissal after one year as long as you're not re-arrested on new charges. You may have go do an essay or community service. Except the dollar value of the goods is a little high, so the prosecutor may take a harder line.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Correia-Champa & Mailhot
    Correia-Champa & Mailhot | Susan Correia Champa
    I would suggest you agree to pay any fines and the outstanding money you owe for the item the court may dismiss the charge. If the court is inclined not to dismiss, ask the court to continue your case without a finding of guilt for 6 months. What this means is that if you do not get into any further trouble the matter will be dismissed after the expiration of the six months. However, again this will involve court costs that the Judge will explain to you.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law | Eric James Schurman
    Get a lawyer to represent you. You may very well avoid a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Up to 93 days in jail, a fine or probation or a combination of all three. If you get a lawyer he might be able to get it so you have no record.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Michael R. Nack, Attorney at Law
    Michael R. Nack, Attorney at Law | Michael R. Nack
    The range of punishment would depend upon exactly what offense you have been charged with and where the case is pending. If, as I suspect, your case is in a Municipal Court, the Judge might fine you up to $1000, but in most cases the fine is less. More importantly, you need to hire an attorney to represent you and to help you avoid taking a conviction on your record. You may have no idea how taking a conviction will hurt you in a variety of ways later in your life.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    The Law Office of James McKain
    The Law Office of James McKain | James McKain
    It sounds like you are being charged with theft in the third degree. Theft in the third degree is a gross misdemeanor which means the maximum penalty is 365 days in jail and/or a $5,000 fine. While theft in the third degree is certainly a serious charge, don't despair yet. Discuss your case with an experienced criminal defense attorney, there may be several possible positive resolutions for your case that can ensure you don't go to jail and don't have a criminal record even without going to trial. Thank you,
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/30/2011
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
    Hello- Maximum one year. For a first offense likely probation.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Attorneys of Michigan, PLLC
    Attorneys of Michigan, PLLC | Daniel Hajji
    In Michigan, if the value of the items stolen were less than $200, it is considered as a misdemeanor retail fraud in the third degree. You can get up to 93 days in jail if it is your first offense and/or fine/costs, probation, community service as well as having to pay restitution. You can also face civil damages from the retailer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Donahue, Sowa & Magana Attorneys at Law
    Donahue, Sowa & Magana Attorneys at Law | Glenn M. Sowa
    When and where is your court date? You should be charged with a misdemeanor with possible punishment of up to one year in the county jail and up to $2500 fine or both. Please contact me at the office below so that I can advise you further.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Gutin and Wolverton
    Gutin and Wolverton | Harley Gutin
    You should ask for a "diversion program" and you will avoid having a record. Probably have to take a class and pay restitution, etc.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    It depends on the jurisdiction (the court for where the crime occurred) but generally you should expect a resolution that does not leave you with a conviction on your record. I would expect a fine and not jail. A compromise of misdemeanor may also be possible. Any competent defense attorney can help you with this.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    You need to hire a lawyer. You might be able to get a pretrial diversion which will help keep the case from becoming a conviction and will allow for your record to be expunged in the future. At worst, you will get a deferred adjudication probation if the case is handled correctly. The charge is a Class B misdemeanor & carries up to a $2,000 fine and up to 6 months in jail as the possible punishment.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Gonzalez Law Associates P.C.
    Gonzalez Law Associates P.C. | Carlos Gonzalez
    If you can afford an attorney get one... In all likelihood however the courts on such first offenses generally offer a non criminal violation.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi | Rodney Nosratabadi
    Your maximum punishment is 6 months in jail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
    You may be eligible for a compromise of misdemeanor which would result in a dismissal but the maximum punishment is 365 days in jail and a $5,000 fine.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Leyba Defense, PLLC
    Leyba Defense, PLLC | Matthew Leyba
    A Theft 3 carries a maximum penalty of 1 year in jail and a $5000 fine. You should probably consult with an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    The maximum criminal penalty is one year in jail and a $5000.00 fine. There is also a law which allows the store to demand a civil monetary penalty. The object is to avoid a conviction and this can very often be done under a law called the compromise of misdemeanor law, which allows the court to dismiss the criminal charge if the civil penalty has been paid. But you should consult with an attorney before paying the civil penalty. I handle a lot of shop lfiting cases and generally get the cases dismissed.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/29/2011
    Clifford Clendenin & O'Hale, LLP
    Clifford Clendenin & O'Hale, LLP | Locke T. Clifford
    It depends on the DA office's policy. You may qualify for a first offender's program. I would recommend hiring an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 6/14/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Petit Larceny, up to 1 year in jail.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/9/2011
    The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones
    The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones | B. Elaine Jones
    There is not a specific punishment for shoplifting. It is either a misdemeanor or a felony depending on the amount. The amount of $160 would be a misdemeanor. If this is your first offense, they will probably offer you a pre-trial intervention program that will require you to do some classes and be under supervision for a period of time. Once you have completed the program they will "no prosecute" your case and there will be no record. If you need an attorney and your case is in the Tampa Bay area please call me for further consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Law Offices of Steven R. Decker
    Law Offices of Steven R. Decker | Steven Decker
    At worst you should receive supervision and a small fine and 2 years after the supervision is terminated you can petition for return of your arrest records. However, you may be eligible for theft deterrent school which would erase the arrest record within months.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    A theft offense can be very serious. While any theft under $500 is a misdemeanor. Such an offense is still punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $1000 fine. The collateral consequences of a conviction can also be extremely significant and preclude a person from finding employment where background checks are performed.

    Often, if you have no prior offenses, a conviction can be avoided with a Stay of Prosecution. A Stay of Prosecution means that the offense is never recorded on your record and stayed for a certain periofd of time to ensure that you do not have another offense.

    We can assist you in making sure that your record is not affected.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Harris Law Firm
    Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
    In Oregon, a conviction for theft of items valued over $100 but less than $1000 (a theft in the second degree) carries a MAXIMUM sentence of one year in jail and a fine of up to $6,250. If it is your first offense, however; it is more than likely, if you are found guilty, you will receive probation, fines, fees and maybe community service or a theft talk class. If this is your first time being charged with a crime, I seriously recommend speaking with an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    It all depends on how good of a lawyer you have.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    With any luck you will be eligible for diversion. With diversion, you sign a confession, waive your right to a speedy trial and do probation. At the end of probation, if you have remained law-abiding, your case is dismissed. With no criminal history, the most likely thing is no jail and a requirement to perform community service if you were to plead guilty. There would fines and fees imposed but jail is not likely. You should pay restitution to Barnes and Nobel. You might be able to get them to agree to a compromise of misdemeanor. A compromise of misdemeanor is granted by the court upon proof of restitution and a declaration from the merchant that they have been made whole. Please call me if you have any further questions.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    For theft under $300 in Louisiana the penalties are: -Jail time of up to 6 months -Fines of up to $1000 Given your status as a minor and clean record, you may be able to negotiate reduced charges and/or sentences. This is something you should consider hiring an attorney to help you with.

    If you decide to pursue legal representation in this matter, we invite you to contact our firm at the information on this page for a free case evaluation to determine whether or not we would be able to assist you.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    You can expect to pay a fine, three years summery probation, and paying back the store for the items plus the cost to them for taking you to court. This will go on your record as petty theft and will affect you on your future arrests. A good attorney is needed to make this non life changing.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
    In Oregon, where I practice, what you'd be looking at is a maximum of 1 year in jail but realistically, you'd normally face a short (usually 1 year or 18 months) period of probation, maybe some community service, maybe a few days in jail. In Portland, you'd likely qualify for a first-time offender program where if you did some community service and attended a class you'd be eligible to have the charges dismissed.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    It depends on the court and the judge. The maximum is 6 months in jail though you would likely receive a fine only. However theft is a crime of moral turpitude carrying long term consequences for employment and licensing. You should have an attorney review your case before you decided what to do. There might be a chance to have the charge reduced to a lesser offense.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Harrison & Harrison
    Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
    Misdemeanor charge. Maximum possible sentence is $1,000 fine and 12 months in jail. At your age and with no priors, you may get lucky and be offered a diversion program of some sort that will keep you from having a theft offense on your record if you complete the program.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    It all depends on the state and even the town. There is a lot of discretion given to the police as to how to charge an offense. What is the level of the offense, misdemeanor A or B? Generally speaking in the towns I deal with, most shoplifting will be a fine and stay out of store type of penalty.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    The DA will offer your attorney an ADC or "Adjournment in Contemplation of Dismissal".As long as you are not re-arrested in six months and do a few days of community service or go to shoplifting school (depending on the court's usual requirements for that city), your charges will be dismissed and you will have no record. Feel free to call for a consultation.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/24/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    Petty theft is generally charged as a misdemeanor and can include jail time, probation, and big fines. These cases are often defensible though. What court is your case in? You can call me at 818-336-1384 if you would like to discuss in further detail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Arnold & Wadsworth
    Arnold & Wadsworth | Brian Arnold
    Depends on what state you are in. You should call an attorney in whatever state you are in and see if they do free consultations. We offer free consultations if you live in Utah. Feel free to give Arnold & Wadsworth a call.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Mercado & Hartung
    Mercado & Hartung | Stephanie Hartung
    Shoplifting that amount is considered theft in the 3rd degree. Theft in the 3rd degree is a gross misdemeanor which is punishable up to a year in jail and a $5000.00 fine (which is not probable for a first offense). It is possible that you will be asked to pay a fine, complete community service hours, and repay the amount of stolen goods (if items were damaged or not returned), you will also be trespassed from Barnes and Noble. One of the most concerning consequences of a theft charge is the impact it will have on you personally. It can affect your ability to get certain types of jobs. You are very young and it is important to preserve your clean record. An attorney can negotiate resolutions that do not involve a conviction and thus prevent the stigma of a theft charge from impacting the rest of your life. Please feel free to call me, free of charge, to discuss your options.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    California Criminal Defense Center
    California Criminal Defense Center | Ardalon Fakhimi
    The maximum jail sentence for a fist time misdemeanor petty theft offense in California is 6 months in jail. Please keep in mind that the prosecutor's office often files charges for 2nd degree burglary in addition to the petty theft offense on many cases. If you are 19 and have no criminal history, you should certainly consult with a lawyer before going to court so that you are informed of possible alternatives to pleasing guilty to this violation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Unless you are in a terrible jurisdiction you will most likely get a misdemeanor, no time some sort of fine and a restitution order if the store didn't get thebooks back. One major problem if you plead to petty theft and you get busted again this mnew case is now a felony (Petty with a Prior) and if you do it while on probation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Beard Law Group, P.C.
    Beard Law Group, P.C. | Christopher Beard
    Shoplifting a value of that amount would be a Class A Misdemeanor. I would imagine your attorney would be able to negotiate a deal with the DA as a youthful offender since this is your first offense and you are under 21. However, the following are the maximum allowable punishments per statute: * 13A-5-7.

    Sentences of imprisonment for misdemeanors and violations.* (a) Sentences for misdemeanors shall be a definite term of imprisonment in the county jail or to hard labor for the county, within the following limitations:
    (1) For a Class A misdemeanor, not more than one year.
    (2) For a Class B misdemeanor, not more than six months.
    (3) For a Class C misdemeanor, not more than three months. (b) Sentences for violations shall be for a definite term of imprisonment in the county jail, not to exceed 30 days. * 13A-5-12. Fines for misdemeanors and violations.* (a) A sentence to pay a fine for a misdemeanor shall be for a definite amount, fixed by the court, within the following limitations:
    (1) For a Class A misdemeanor, not more than $6,000;
    (2) For a Class B misdemeanor, not more than $3,000;
    (3) For a Class C misdemeanor, not more than $500; or
    (4) Any amount not exceeding double the pecuniary gain to the defendant or loss to the victim caused by the commission of the offense. (b) A sentence to pay a fine for a violation shall be for a definite amount, fixed by the court, not to exceed $200, or any amount not exceeding double the pecuniary gain to the defendant or loss to the victim caused by the commission of the offense. (c) As used in this section, gain means the amount of money or the value of property derived from the commission of the crime, less the amount of money or the value of property returned to the victim of the crime or seized or surrendered to lawful authority prior to the time sentence is imposed. Value shall be determined by the standards established in subdivision (14) of Section 13A-8-1 . (d) The court may conduct a hearing upon the issue of defendant's gain or the victim's loss from the crime according to procedures established by rule of court.er will not be valid.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    You could be facing up to six months jail time and a fine of $500.00 if you are required to appear in a municipal court. You could be facing up to one year aand a fine of up to $6,000 if you are required to appear in District Court.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
    Hiring an experienced criminal defense attorney in advance of your court date is the best defense you will have.
    Answer Applies to: Hawaii
    Replied: 4/21/2011
    Kevin Smith, Attorney at Law
    Kevin Smith, Attorney at Law | Kevin Smith
    In Connecticut, shoplifting is considered a larceny, and the punishment range depends upon the value of the property stolen. In your case, if the value is $160 you could be charged with Sixth Degree Larceny, a Class C Misdemeanor punishable by up to 3 months in jail and/or up to $500 in fines. If you have no prior criminal record, you are likely to be eligible for a pretrial diversionary program known as Accelerated Rehabilitation which, if successfully completed, entitles you to a dismissal of the charges. I have also had experience resolving these cases with some community service, thereby preserving the Accelerated Rehabilitation program for my client while still getting the case dismissed. My clients are generally happy with this because it means that if they need the Accelerated Rehabilitation program in the future for a more serious charge they still have it available to them.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    Since it's your first offense, you can expect your case to be given an ACOD, or an Adjournment in contemplation of Dismissal, as long as you go through the StopLift Program and complete it. Consult with an experienced criminal defense lawyer right away since it could go another way and you could have much harsher things happen to you. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    If you were charged with a misdemeanor, you probably are looking at a long period of supervision, which is not a conviction on your permanent record, or probation, which is a permanent mark on your record. Probably, you will have either regular community service or SWAP community service, which is supervised by the sheriff's office, and is strictly enforced. You may have to attend theft deterrent school, as well. If charged with a felony, you will probably get a similar sentence, but it will appear on your permanent criminal history. I doubt you will get time in jail or prison, but in either case, because incarceration is possible, retain an attorney to insure you stay out of jail and that your rights are protected.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    LynchLaw
    LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
    It depends on how the act is charged. A simple petty theft conviction can be punished with a $1,000 fine or six months in jail. However, if it can be shown an individual entered the store with the intent to commit a crime, they can also be charged with commercial burglary. A commercial burglary conviction can be punished with one year in jail. However, typically an individual without a criminal record would not be sentenced to such a long punishment. Additionally, first offenders have jail alternatives that should be explored as well. Hope that helps.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC
    Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC | Lacy Fields
    It will depend on the jurisdiction. I.e. is this in the County Circuit Court, or in a municipal court? If you get an attorney, there is a good chance you can get this amended to a less serious charges such as "littering", plead guilty to the littering charges and pay a fine. Otherwise, you will likely be placed on SIS probation, such that if you successfully complete probation the charges will not show up on your record. Keep in mind, the prosecutor gets to decide what deal to offer you, and if you reject the deal, the judge gets to decide your punishment. Therefore, which judge and which prosecutor are assigned to your case will make a difference in the outcome you can expect. If you have further questions, feel free to contact my office.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman | Gabriel Dorman
    A first time petty theft conviction is punishable by up to 6 months in county jail and/or a maximum $1000 fine. However, the real issue with a first time shoplifting offense isn't so much with the punishment, but rather, with the future consequences of a conviction. Given the fact that you are 19 years old. a petty theft conviction can be devastating. It can disqualify you from future employment opportunities, professional licenses and on and on. So the goal for you, is to do everything possible to avoid a petty theft conviction. That starts with hiring an experienced criminal defense lawyer. This will maximize your chances of avoiding that conviction. I hope this answer was helpful. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    Theft 3 is a gross misdemeanor. Although the maximum penalty is 365 days in jail, if this is your first offense, a good lawyer should be able to get you no jail time, or, at most, a couple of days. Please feel free to contact me if you have any additional questions.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Ferguson & Ferguson
    Ferguson & Ferguson | Randy W. Ferguson
    Apply for youthful offender. If you plead or are found guilty, your file will be sealed. Normally a fine, costs and some probation.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    Based on the dollar amount, the crime is a misdemeanor, Theft of Property in the Third Degree, punishable by one year or less. You should get a lawyer. If you can't afford one, the court will appoint one for you. You should also ask for Youthful Offender treatment. It seals your record. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein | Neal L. Weinstein
    On a first offense, the DA may offer you a 'deferred disposition', meaning you would plead guilty but not be sentenced, and the case would be continued for a year and dismissed if you stay out of trouble for the year. There is an administrative fee that you must pay either by the month or up front, but this would result in a situation with no convictions and no record.
    Answer Applies to: Maine
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Andrew R. Lynch, P.C.
    Andrew R. Lynch, P.C. | Andrew R. Lynch
    Misdemeanor shoplifting can lead to 12 months of probation or jail and a $1000 fine. In practice it will be less, far less, but at your age you need to try and see if some disposition can be had other than conviction. A guilty plea for theft can hurt you down the road.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    Depending on the exact charge you may be able to obtain an ACOD ( adjournment in contemplation of dismissal) which means that the case is adjourned, usually for 6 months, and if you do not get in trouble before the next court date, then the case will be automatically dismissed on that court date. If you cannot get an ACOD you may get the crime reduced from a misdemeanor to a violation which is not a crime and if you obtain Youthful Offender status (because you are 19, then if you are convicted the conviction will be vacated and the records sealed. You should hire an attorney since it is unlikely that if you represent yourself that you would get an ACOD or Youthful Offender status.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    Thank you for yoru inquiry. Shoplifting is called "Retail Fraud" in Michigan. At the level you suggest, it is retail Fraud 3rd. This is a 93-day misdemeanor. At age 19, you have available to you the possiblity of a HYTA plea. This would effectively keep this matter off your public record should you make a plea. Many persons find that this meets many of their goals when trying to resolve their case. If your case is in the Detroit Metro Area (Wayne, Oakland or Macomb), I would welcome an opportunity to discuss your case should you be seeking an attorney to represent you. You may contact me to arrange a date and time to meet.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Shoplifting of $160.00 worth of merchandise is a misdemeanor. If that is the charge, I would anticipate a short time in custody and a fine. However, You might be able to have community service or some other disposition than jail. That will depend on where you are appearing, the judge and the DA. I strongly recommend that you obtain the services of an attorney. Thewre are frequently many things that are arranged in in chambers conferences that defendants do not attend.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Depends upon whether it is a felony or misdemeanor. When charged with a felony, you potentially face one or more years in prison if convicted; on a misdemeanor, you potentially face up to 6-12 months in jail on each count. Multiple counts and charges just make your situation worse, of course. The outcome if handled right is more likely to be fines and probation. What can you do? Hire an attorney, unless you know how to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor intending to convict. No amount of free 'tips and hints' from here or anywhere else are going to effectively help you in your defense, other than the advice to exercise the 5th Amendment right to not talk to anyone except an attorney about the case. Most police and prosecutors will happily tell you that 95% of people convict themselves by trying to be 'helpful and cooperative', either during initial contact, questioning, interview or interrogation. If serious about hiring counsel, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts | Andrew Stephen Roberts
    Depending on your record , it is quite possible that an attorney could arrange for an alternative which would eventually get the matter dismissed.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/21/2011
    Law Office of Daniel J. Larin
    Law Office of Daniel J. Larin | Daniel Larin
    There is very little chance that you will end up in jail. You will end up on some type of probation where you will be required to participate in a class or possibly counseling. Because of your age, you may avoid a criminal record if the matter gets taken under advisement. You need to consult with a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    In New York you are facing petit larceny charges, a class A misdemeanor. You probably are also charged (or will be charged) with possession of stolen property, another misdemeanor. You are facing a potential criminal record, one year in jail, probation, fines, community service, or any combination, thereof. However, since you have no prior contact with the justice system, your lawyer may be able to negotiate a plea to a non-criminal infraction, which results in no criminal record. Typical punishment is a few days of community service. Advice: hire a lawyer to insure that this is actually done.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    It depends on the county. In some places, you can get the charges dismissed if you do community service. In some places, you could be tried and convicted for a misdemeanor, which would probably result in a year or two of probation, and possibly a few days in jail. That conviction would probably be expungeable after three years, if you have no new offenses and if you comply with all conditions of your probation.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    The punishment is up to 93 days in jail, plus fines and civil damages. The biggest thing is to try and keep it off your criminal record. Please contact me directly to discuss your options.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O.
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O. | Eric R. Chandler
    I depends, if in Omaha, you will likely be charged under the city ordinance which carries 0-6months in jail, $500 fine, both or probation. If you have nothing on your record, there is a good chance you are eligible for a diversionary program.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    The charge would be Retail Fraud in the 3rd Degree. That is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 93 days in jail, fines up to $500 or three times the value of the items, whichever is greater, or both jail and a fine. If it is your first offense, you may be eligible for a diversion program. Under that, you can avoid having the charge appear on your record as long as you complete the program which usually involves community service, attending classes, etc. I would suggest retaining an experienced criminal lawyer as they be able to spot problems in the police report that could reduce or dismiss the charges. Best of everything.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    There is a good chance, with the help of a good attorney, that you might only be required to take an anti-theft class and then have the charge reduced to infraction or even dismissed.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    The possible penalty is up to 1 year in jail and / or a $1,000 fine. It is unlikely you would get any jail time and might be able to keep the matter off of your permanent conviction record. You should consult with a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    With a lawyer you may be able to get into diversion and end up with zero on your record, please call I can help.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 4/22/2011
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    Diversion- Petty Larceny school and community service.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 4/21/2011
    Allan & Summary
    Allan & Summary | Justin Summary
    It would depend whether your charged with a municipal stealing charge or a state stealing charge but typically you would be facing a maximum of 1 year in jail. With no priors you should be a good candidate for probation but you should still hire an attorney to help you try to avoid a conviction being placed on your permanent record.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 4/21/2011
    Lisa Mulligan Law Offices, LLC
    Lisa Mulligan Law Offices, LLC | Lisa Mulligan
    It sounds like you are probably charged with a misdemeanor theft, which means that they could technically give you up to a year in jail - but don't panic! - you are highly unlikely to get a lot of jail time, if any. You should talk to your lawyer about the options, and he/she can negotiate with the prosecutor on your behalf. They may be able to work out a deal for community service hours, or probation, for example. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 4/21/2011
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law | Edward A. Kroll
    In part, this will depend on the county the act was committed in. If it is in Portland (Multnomah County), there is a chance you could be eligible for "Community Court," a program where by doing some community service and attending classes, the charge could be dismissed. If your charge is elsewhere, then such a program isn't available, and you will likely be charged with a misdemeanor. Having a theft on your record can hurt your future chances of employment. Wherever you are, you should talk to a criminal defense lawyer as soon as you can. I am a former prosecutor who has handled a lot of theft cases and would be happy to discuss your options with you, free of charge. But whatever you do, don't wait. The quicker you act, the quicker an attorney can strat helping you mitigate the damage this could cause.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 4/21/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    Petit theft is a class A misdemeanor, carrying up to 12 months jail and up to $2,500 fine. For a first offense, a diversion or probation would be normal.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 4/21/2011
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