What is the max amount that I'm entitled to sue the driver if I was hit while crossing the street? 18 Answers as of May 08, 2014

Hit by a car while crossing the street.

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Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
There is no maximum, but what you ask for and what you get are not necessarily the same. Most drivers have the legal minimum policy of $15,000. It is rare to get more than the policy limit.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/8/2014
Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
You can sue for whatever you want to, however, you will only get what you can prove to a jury.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/8/2014
Doroshow, Pasquale, Krawitz & Bhaya | Donald E. Marston
That depends on the circumstances of the accident and your injuries.
Answer Applies to: Delaware
Replied: 5/8/2014
Boesen Law, LLC
Boesen Law, LLC | Joseph J. Fraser III
Colorado pleadings do not allow a demand for a particular amount of money unless you're dealing with a contract or debt. You must prove your entitlement to any amount of economic losses like medical expenses and lost earnings, then present evidence to support non-economic damages for pain and suffering, loss of enjoyment, disfigurement and such. The law currently does cap that award around $366,000.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 5/8/2014
Chalat Hatten Koupal & Banker PC
Chalat Hatten Koupal & Banker PC | Linda Chalat
In any personal injury lawsuit, you are only entitled to seek money for the actual injuries which you have suffered. The injuries you suffered from the accident will determine the settlement value of your claims.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 5/8/2014
    Candiano Law Office
    Candiano Law Office | Charles J. Candiano
    There is no maximum. In theory, it is whatever you can prove. In practice, your recovery will probably be limited by the amount of insurance available.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
    You can sue for a million dollars if your injuries justify it, but you can only say "in excess of $10000" in your pleadings why don't you see a PI lawyer if you have a serious case. Don't try to dramatize it, just give the lawyer the facts. He will know what to tell you.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Law Office of Linda K. Frieder
    Law Office of Linda K. Frieder | Linda K. Frieder, Esq.
    There is no cap on a lawsuit arising out of a car accident.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Gregory S. Shurman, LLC
    Gregory S. Shurman, LLC | Gregory S Shurman
    Assuming the driver is at fault for your injuries, you are entitled to payment for all your damages, including medical bills, lost wages and pain and suffering.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Ty Wilson Law
    Ty Wilson Law | Ty Wilson
    The amount to determine should be based upon your past lost wages, past medical bills, past pain and suffering. If you are still treating and will be for some time you will need to also add in your number the amount of future lost wages you will lose, any future medical bills and future pain and suffering. Your question is often answered by the policy limits and assets of the driver that hit you. Some other factors to consider is where you were hit. If you were in the cross walk crossing the street properly when the other driver hit you the claim has more value than if you were randomly crossing the street. Too many factors, you should speak with a personal injury attorney to make sure you understand what you are attempting to do. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Gregory M Janks, PC
    Gregory M Janks, PC | Gregory M Janks
    Generally there is no maximum amount in motor vehicle crash cases in Michigan. You will be entitled to claim all damages allowable under the law and that you prove if you also prove liability and proximate cause. As a practical matter your collection may be effectively limited by the applicable policy limits of the defendant(s).
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Trendowski & Allen, PC
    Trendowski & Allen, PC | Gregory Allen
    There is no statutory cap to your claim for personal injuries for this type of accident in Connecticut. The value of your claim is very factually specific. It will depend on the nature and type of your injuries (which I hope are not severe) and the treatment you needed. The impact those injuries had on your life and how long you suffered from the injuries as well as their effect also has an impact on the value. Many factors go into the valuation, some increase the number and some decrease the number. How the accident occurred could also impact the value. For me to give my clients a good estimate of the value of their cases I typically need to talk to them in detail for an extended period of time. This usually takes place over the course of several meetings while they are recovering from their injuries. I also will need to review their medical records and the police report and any other investigative materials available about how the accident occurred.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Ferguson & Ferguson
    Ferguson & Ferguson | Randy W. Ferguson
    There is no max set by law. The case is worth what your case is worth. Depends on your injuries and if you or they are at fault.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    You can sue for whatever you wish, you can only recover you damages.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Matthew D Kaplan LLC
    Matthew D Kaplan LLC | Matthew D Kaplan
    There is no maximum amount. It really depends on your injuries.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/8/2014
    Barry Rabovsky & Associates
    Barry Rabovsky & Associates | Barry Rabovsky
    The amount that you might be able to recover would be based upon the facts of your accident and your medical treatment and bills as well as lost time from work.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/7/2014
    Curry, Roby & Mulvey Co., LLC
    Curry, Roby & Mulvey Co., LLC | Bruce A. Curry
    There is no maximum amount that can be requested, but any eventual jury award could be limited depending upon the type (compensatory vs. punitive) and amount of damages awarded.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 5/7/2014
    Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
    There is no limit on how much you can sue for. ?In California, if it is greater than $25,000, you are not supposed to put down a figure. Based upon your question, it is clear that you do not understand how the legal system works. You should see some plaintiff tort attorneys to see what they can do for you; normally they take a percentage of what you recover.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/7/2014
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