What is likely to happen in court if I have a failure for a warrant and failure to appear? 10 Answers as of February 13, 2012

I have 1 warrant for failure to pay on a misdemeanor and also I was stopped driving with no license and have a failure to appear.. I want to fix these, but I have no means to pay. I have a daughter and I'm scared about any jail time I would have to serve for these offenses.

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Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
If you don't clear up the warrants by scheduling a court appearance you will surely be eventually arrested. That is the worst thing that will happen so I would take my chances and go to court.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/13/2012
Law Office of Hieu Vu
Law Office of Hieu Vu | Hieu N Vu
First off, don't get pulled over and don't get into any contact with law enforcement. They will cuff you up quicker than superman on laundry day. You have two options. The first is to go in yourself and recall the warrant and explain to the judge why you missed your payments. This is better than getting caught and brought in. However you run the risk of getting taken in. I do not know the specifics of your situation ie, past history or violations, court, judge, to assess. You can call me if you want. The second option is to hire an attorney who can go in and negotiate with the court for you. The advantages of this is that if the court decides to punish you or bring you into custody, you will not be around. In other words, you get to have your cake and eat it too.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/13/2012
Attorney at Law | Ernest Krause
If you are scared about jail time then go immediately to the court clerk to get a court date. Why wait for more trouble, which would be more expensive.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/2/2012
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
The Judge does not want to put you in jail. The Judge will work with you on a payment schedule. However, you do need to show some progress on your fines. If you cannot show a good faith effort in paying your fines they will be converted into jail time. In most counties the jails are overcrowded and ten days may only be one day. Go into court as soon as you can to preserve as many options as you can.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/1/2012
Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
Sitting around worrying is not going to make it go away.? One day you will blow a stop sign or speed and the warrant will surface. If you have no money get to the Public Defender's office.? If you failed to pay a fine on a misdemeanor it means you had to?have gone to court so you were represented by someone. Anyhow if you can't afford that person (or it was the P. D.) get them to add you to calendar immediately (before you get nailed on the warrant).? Judges today understand how many people have no money and will often let you work off the fine, etc.? BUT if you get brought in without voluntarily coming in, dude, you are in deep doo doo and you'd better hope your ex-wife has room in her life for your daughter.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/31/2012
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann | Christopher J. McCann
    You need to go in to court to have the warrant recalled. In most cases, though not all, the courts will not require bond on a case this minor. You can get time to pay off fines and fees or convert it to community service.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/31/2012
    The Law Office of Stephanie M. Arrache
    The Law Office of Stephanie M. Arrache | Stephanie Arrache
    The first thing I would want to know are how long ago were the warrants issued, why did you fail to appear, and what was the misdemeanor? You could ask the court for leniency and acknowledge that you know you handled the situation poorly, but are willing to take care of everything now. Many courts will allow community service in lieu of fines, or will allow payment plans for a nominal charge. Because it's a misdemeanor, an attorney could appear on your behalf, and try to keep you from having to appear in front of the judge, which also reduces your chances of being taken into custody. I recommend speaking with an attorney immediately.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/31/2012
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    You should hire an attorney to go to court (without you) to recall the warrant. If you're not willing to spend a little money, then you will probably end up being pulled over for a minor traffic infraction and taken straight to jail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/31/2012
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Warrants are not good things. Not attending to things the court tells you to take cre of is not a good thing either. The court does not cre about the child, nor does the DA. You have two choices. You can continue to put your head in the sand and just fret over the difficulty or you can set a court date and show up. If you choose the first option, I will just about guarantee you will be arrested and stay in jail for the pendency of the case. If you choose the second option, you might get into court before you are arrested. Appearing out of custody tends to do more to assure that you will stay out. Ask for an attorney when you get to court. Doing the second aso puts you in the position of telling the judge you tried to surrender on the warrant but unfortunately were arrested before the court date.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/31/2012
    Robert Mortland
    Robert Mortland | Law Office of Robert Mortland
    The longer you wait, the more likely the court will not work with you in most instances. You should put yourself on calendar and face the inevitable. However, you may want to call and speak with your attorney first.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/31/2012
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