What happens if you get multiple drunk driving offenses? 39 Answers as of June 21, 2011

What happens if you get multiple drunk driving offenses?

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Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
Multiple DUI offenses results in greater penalties. jail is a possibility, as well as loss of your driving privileges. You may check my web site for a list of penalties in Michigan. You would need to check the laws in other states and specifically in your state to see what applies to you.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/20/2011
Law Office of Richard Williams
Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
A fourth DUI conviction in the State of Alabama is a felony and you could receive a sentence of ten years in the State penitentiary. There is usually an indefinite suspension of your driving license.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 6/17/2011
Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC
Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC | Thomas A. Medford, Jr.
You could face several jail sentences to be served back to back and/or the revocation of your driver's license for at least a year depending on the law of the jurisdiction that you are located in.
Answer Applies to: District of Columbia
Replied: 6/17/2011
Timothy J. Thill P.C.
Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
There is a good probability that you will have to serve some jail time. I might tell you to consider consolidating all the offenses into a single court for disposition, in order that sentences MAY be served concurrently, instead of consecutively. You should retain a good DUI lawyer to represent you immediately! You are facing some real serious matters.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 6/17/2011
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
How many? It makes a difference. If it's more than one, you are going to have a problem. More than that and you have a big problem on your hands. Consult with a local criminal defense attorney right away and stop drinking entirely NOW. There is no excuse for more than one DWI because after the first one, you know how hard they're going on every driver who drinks and you know it will only get harder with each subsequent DWI. Sorry to sound harsh, but I read these things all the time and marvel at how people can get more than one DWI when they already know the consequences of the first one. Basically, stop drinking NOW. And certainly don't drive at all if you've even breathed in the scent of alcohol. That's how tough it is in the Courts today. Consult with a good criminal defense lawyer and fight both cases strenuously. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/17/2011
    Lowenstein Law Office
    Lowenstein Law Office | Anthony Lowenstein
    Then you can lose your license and go to jail. For more information, please see my website.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    In San Diego, a second DUI in a ten-year period carries 96 hours jail time (minimum), and a fine of $2K among other things. A third DUI carries a minimum of 120 days custody, among other things. By the time you get a second DUI, the DMV repercussions on your license are very hard to overcome.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
    The potential maximum penalties for a conviction generally escalate and a person may be charged with a felony drunk driving depending on your state's particular laws, the timing of when the offenses occurred, and your number of prior convictions. I would recommend retaining an attorney or requesting the court appoint you an attorney if you have been charged with this offense.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman | Scott G. Hilderman
    The penalty increases for each offense with a felony offense being a minimum of one year in prison.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    Some may be filed as misdemeanors while some may end up as felonies. You should consult with an experienced DUI attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    Any OUI (Operating Under the Influence) charge has the potential penalty of jail time. It is highly unlikely on a 1st offense and fairly unlikely on the 2nd offense, but depending on many factors, it becomes harder and harder to avoid jail each time. Of course if you take the case to trial and win, you not only avoid jail, but be driving again shortly thereafter.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    You could end up in jail, with stiff fines and a revoked license. If you are now fighting charges, if youre serious about hiring counsel to help you in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. Keep in mind a little free advice: When you are arrested for DUI, whether alcohol or drugs, then upon release from jail or booking you were given documents that included a notice that you have only ten days to file a request with DMV for a hearing on an appeal of an automatic one-year suspension of your license imposed by DMV. That is separate and runs consecutively with any suspension that may be imposed by the court. Contact DMV and do so, timely, then appear at your scheduled DMV hearing and present any supporting evidence and testimony. If you don't know how to do these things, then hire an attorney that does. If serious about hiring counsel to help you in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman
    The Law Offices of Gabriel Dorman | Gabriel Dorman
    Logically, the consequences for a DUI get worse the more you do it. How bad the consequences get depends on how many DUI convictions you have, how much time has passed between convictions, if you are on probation for a DUI conviction and so on. A prior DUI conviction is one that occurred within 10 years of your current DUI arrest. While there is no mandatory jail requirement on a first time DUI conviction in California, a second DUI carries a mandatory minimum of 96 hours in jail, a third carries a mandatory minimum of 120 days in county jail and a fourth DUI conviction in 10 years can be charged as a felony and carries a maximum sentence of up to three years in state prison. Of course, there are also fines, fees, alcohol classes and drivers license suspension with any DUI. I hope this answer was helpful. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller | Thomas Mueller
    There are many insurance carriers that insure people with DUI convictions. The internet would be a good place to start.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Well you will have your license revoked (not suspended)and increased penalties. In Michigan the third DUI is charged as a felony that carries up to 5 years in prison.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    The Amount of jail time is increased, the fine is more and the school is longer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Komanapalli Massey LLP
    Komanapalli Massey LLP | Mark A. Massey, Esq.
    You go to jail or prison, depending on how many. Do yourself a favor, admit you have a problem and make use of the life changing benefits of AA. Good luck friend. Your bottom is coming.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    In Louisiana, DUI is an enhanceable offense. This means that for each violation that occurs within a certain time period (within 10 years of a prior conviction), the penalties for additional convictions increase automatically. Louisiana DUI offense penalties increase as follows: 1st Offense - Fines of $300 - $1,000; Jail time of 10 days to 6 months 2nd Offense - Fines of $750 - $1,000; Jail time of 30 days to 6 months (mandatory 48 hours in jail) 3rd Offense - Fines of $2,000; Jail time of 1 year - 5 years (mandatory 1 year in jail) 4th Offense and up - Fines of $5,000; Jail time of 10 years - 30 years (mandatory 2 years in jail) Multiple DUI Offense can have a very serious impact on your life. For this reason, it is always advisable to hire an experienced DUI lawyer to represent you in these cases. If you are seeking legal representation in this matter in Louisiana, we invite you to contact our firm at the information on this page for a free case evaluation.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    The punishments get more severe each time you get a new one.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Pontrello Law
    Pontrello Law | William Pontrello
    Jail, fine and suspensions increase.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    The penalties become increasingly more severe. Eventually, it becomes a felony and you can face serious jail time.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    LT Pepper Law
    LT Pepper Law | Luke T. Pepper
    They are part of your records and compound your sentence for any further DUI convictions. It also might prevent you from holding certain jobs or even being hired for jobs.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    Colorado requires jail time for convictions after the first one.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    You risk jail and at three, you get a felony. It's best to hire an experienced local attorney to plan a strategy.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    The penalties increase for multiple convictions of DUI or DWI. On a second conviction there is a minimum mandatory jail sentence of 48 hours or thirty days community service. On a third conviction, there is a mandatory 60 day sentence. On a fourth, it is a felony with a sentencing range of a year and a day to ten years. Interestingly, on a fourth conviction, despite it being a felony, the court has more discretion and could order probation with no jail time to serve if you stayed out of trouble. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    I am not sure if you have already gotten several DWI charges or if you are planning to drive drunk often. Assuming you have two or three DWI convictions you can expect to lose your license permanently or for 5 years, pay $10,000 a year in car insurance, and possibly face a jail term. Drunk driving is like firing a gun at a moving train and hoping that not one gets hit by the bullets. It is a very serious crime that will hurt your chances of getting a good job and can result in your being convicted of a felony. As a felon you cannot vote, get a liquor license, own a firearm, or get bonded or insured. You will find it hard to get welfare, an apartment, or government benefits. If all of that is not enough, you will eventually end up with cirrhosis of the liver, kidney disease, or a heart attack.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    The sentences go up steeply, and fairly consistently, for each offense, although it varies a little from county to county. It also makes it much harder to win at trial, because they are likely to be tried together and the jury will hear about multiple incidents.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    You can go to jail. Get an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    Do you mean you got another drunk driving charge while one is still ongoing? Or did you just happen to get another one sometime after the first one was resolved? In either scenario, the outcome is not good. The more DUIs you have the more heightened the punishments and potential costs are. If you get three (3) DUIs in Michigan, it becomes a felony charge, so be careful! Retain an experienced DUI attorney immediately.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC | Raymond J. Savoy
    For each offense the license suspension increases, with a maximum penalty of a lifetime suspension. You will also face jail time and fines
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    What happens to what? And do you mean multiple charges pending at one time, or subsequent to each other? Generally, punishment for subsequent DWIs go up. In Texas, the first is a class b misdemeanor, the 2nd a class a misdemeanor, the 3rd a felony. Subsequent DWIs can be felonies and can even be enhanced with other felony DWIs to make it to the habitual offender status. With subsequent DWIs, the privilege to drive a motor vehicle is suspended for longer and longer periods of time. Charges are placed on the driver's license. Insurance premiums go up.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    In most states, the penalties get more severe with each new conviction. In some states, the fourth or fifth conviction is a felony. If you have been arrested for a second DUI, that correlates with a 75% chance that you are an alcoholic or an alcohol abuser. Any more than two mean you are almost certain to be an alcoholic. If you are a woman, alcoholism means you will be dead by age 50 or so. Most male alcoholics make it to late 50s or early 60s. Of course excessive alcohol consumption can lead to esophageal cancer, stomach cancer and colorectal cancer. It can also lead to cirrhosis of the liver and dementia. If jail hasn't gotten you sober your next wakeup may be sudden death. Do yourself a favor. Obtain an alcohol evaluation and follow the recommendations to the letter. If nothing else, the court will be impressed that you are taking your DUI charge seriously and give you a break. It may even save your life.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
    Typically, the penalty (meaning jail time, fines and license suspensions) increases with each DUII conviction you rack up. In Oregon where I practice, if you get two misdemeanor convictions, the third is a felony (with a lifetime license revocation) and the fourth calls for a presumptive prison sentence. If you've currently got multiple DUII cases pending, then you may end up doing a bunch of jail and losing your license for a while.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Contact a DUI specialist, who can probably maneuver/separate the cases and have you plead to multiple firsts. Most prosecutors are not diligent in coordinating multiple pending DUI's, especially when they are in different courthouses or cross county. A good lawyer may save you months in jail time, not to mention possible dismissal or reduction in charge(s).
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    The English Law Firm
    The English Law Firm | Robert English
    Generally with multiple offenses, the penalties will increase and would likely include higher fines, longer alcohol programs, jail time, possible vehicle impound or ignition interlock device, and license suspensions.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/15/2011
    Van Ness Law Group
    Van Ness Law Group | Varinia Van Ness
    Depends how many and how far apart. If 2 within 5 years, there is a minimum 10 days in jail and probation, fines, DUI school, interlock and suspension of driver's license. The suspension length is determined by the number of priors and how far apart.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/15/2011
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