What happens if my ex wife won't talk to me at all about my kids? 25 Answers as of July 12, 2013

Every time I ask my ex wife to speak to me about kids she never wants to answer any questions and threatens to take me to court, then hangs up or walks away from me. What can I do?

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Deal & Hooks, LLC
Deal & Hooks, LLC | Shawn P. Hooks
What does your decree say? Does it state that you are allowed to have telephone contact with the kids? What does she threaten to take you to court for? You should consult an attorney to see what your options are based on what the court ordered as part of the divorce.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 6/9/2011
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
File an Order to Show Cause for Family Counseling, if you feel that the lack of communication is harmful to your children. You would best be represented by an experienced family law attorney.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/8/2011
Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A.
Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A. | Joanna Mitchell
You should most likely take her to court yourself for contempt due to her failure to abide by shared parenting principles. However, I would need to know more about your case in order to fully answer your question. My office offers free initial telephone consultations if you would like to discuss this matter in more detail, as well as explore the potential rights and options available. If you would like to coordinate a free initial telephone consultation, please contact my office.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 6/8/2011
Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
Assume Oregon law applies: You may need to take her to court to enforce your parenting time rights. As for talking to you, that may not be a requirement of the judgment; you may choose other ways of communicating such as email, text, etc; but remember what ever you write could show up in front of a Judge, so be polite.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 6/8/2011
Berner Law Group, PLLC
Berner Law Group, PLLC | Jack Berner
Do you have a Court-approved parenting plan? If you're a Western Washington resident, feel free to contact my office for a free, no obligation consultation regarding your situation.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 6/8/2011
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    Assuming the divorce is complete and there are custody orders, what do they say? Have you considered using www.ourfamilywizard.com for your communications portal? The site is excellent for high conflict custody issues. Now, since I don't know the facts, if she is denying your visitation and that is what she will not talk about, you have two choices: continue with the same routine, or you go to court. Bottom line, anytime one party threatens court, you really have no choice, hire a lawyer and take them to court first. Be proactive, she does not automatically win because she is mom, this is Texas, Dad's have rights too, unfortunately, too many men have been told otherwise and tend to believe it.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    Take her to court and have a court direct her to do so or he/she will take custody away from her. That will usually turn her head around. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    That really depends on what your questions are and why she won't talk to you. If you are asking responsible, reasonable questions concerning the kids, you might be able to convince a judge to appoint a mental health professional with experience in post-divorce custody cases to attempt to assist you & your ex- in finding reasonable ways to communicate in the best interests of the children.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Seattle Divorce Services
    Seattle Divorce Services | Michael V. Fancher
    Unfortunately under Washington law I don't know of anything you can do to make her talk to you. If you wind up in court about something else, I would mention this problem to the judge.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    Use email. That is now the preferred method by the courts as there is a record of the communication. Alternatively, if she is preventing visitation in violation of the divorce order, then you can file for contempt. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law
    Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law | Neville J. Bedford
    You may need to file a motion in court to enforce your visitation rights. Consult with a Family Law Attorney in your area.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Vermeulen Law office P.A.
    Vermeulen Law office P.A. | Jacob T. Erickson
    The right to free speech includes the right to not speak. She is not legally obligated to discuss things with you, unless the Court's Judgment and Decree specifically says otherwise. You will need to read through your divorce decree and decide if you think you have grounds to bring an action to Court or a mediator. An attorney can review that document and discuss your options with you.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    The answer depends on what your court order indicates regarding custody, parenting time and what information is being requested. Without a review of your decree, advice is difficult.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
    Sounds like you need to get the two of you into co-parenting therapy. Only there will there be someone impartial who can try to convince her of the importance of communication.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    File a motion for contempt if you have joint custody.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    It is unclear, based upon the facts, exactly what information you seek, or what the terms of visitation are. If you presently do not have good or fair visitation rights established, then you should contact a divorce lawyer in your community about the idea of seeking a modification as to visitation. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    I'm not clear what you want to discuss with your ex-wife. if the issue is child visitation enforcement, or child support modification, the court may be the best place to have those discussions. If you are bringing up an issue not covered by your divorce decree or child parenting plan, then you are somewhat on your own. She doesn't have to talk with you about them. Please discuss this issue in greater detail with a local domestic relations attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law | Gregory T. Buckley
    Obviously she should be willing to speak to you about the children. How often do you see the children? How old are they? Are you able to email them (if they are old enough)? I am not sure on what basis she would take you back to court. She appears to have some major issues.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Glenn E. Tanner
    Glenn E. Tanner | Glenn E. Tanner
    It's difficult to raise children with someone who won't talk to you. Get a detailed parenting plan and ask the court to order that you communicate important information about the children in writing or by email.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Beresford Booth PLLC
    Beresford Booth PLLC | S. Scott Burkhalter
    In Washington State, your custody agreement is governed by a parenting plan/residential schedule. The Court typically frowns on lack of communication.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Michael Apicella
    Michael Apicella | Apicella Law and Mediation
    Take her up on her offer to go to court, and request court orders that she timely respond to your written requests for information about the kids. If she continues to refuse to communicate with you about your children, then she may ultimately lose timeshare. You can also ask that both parties attend co-parenting counseling, which is usually helpful in improving the parents communication.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Willick Law Group
    Willick Law Group | Marshal S. Willick
    There is insufficient information to frame a meaningful answer - much depends on the exiting orders: who has been directed to do, say, or provide what to whom. The Nevada Supreme Court gave better guidance in 2009 of the meaning of joint legal custody - including the duty to provide information - in the Rivero case. That opinion is posted publicly online with a lot of other information. To answer the last question, you can try to discuss things, send a letter threatening what you will do if she does not provide what you want, or file a motion, seeking either specific performance of some tasks, or such custodial changes as you feel are required or necessary.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 6/7/2011
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller | Jody A. Miller
    If this is a violation of the divorce decree, i.e., she is required to talk to you and inform you about what is going on with the kids, then you can file a motion for contempt and allege that she is in violation of the court order.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/7/2011
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    It depends upon what you are trying to discuss. It would be better to get specifics before providing advise.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2013
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    Unless your divorce decree requires such cooperation, it does not violate the decree. It may give you reason to see a lawyer to see what your chances are with modification of visitation or custody.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/7/2011
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