What happens if I refuse to attend that AA session? 46 Answers as of June 19, 2013

I was required to attend several AA sessions. I am not comfortable with this and I told my lawyer about it. He said that unfortunately, I really have to attend this. What happens if I refuse to attend these sessions? Have you heard of any alternatives for the AA session?

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Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
If you have a court-order requiring you to attend those sessions, you could get in serious trouble unless the judge agrees to modify the order. If you don't have a court-order, you may be able to have more discretion in terms of treatment programs. I'd recommend you discuss the issue with your lawyer.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/11/2012
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
If this is a condition of a probation, then refusal to comply could result in a probation violation which could send you to jail. I would take your attorneys advice.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 3/16/2012
Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
Depending upon what state you are in, failure to attend AA may be considered a violation of probation - subjecting you to jail time.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/13/2012
Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC
Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC | Thomas A. Medford, Jr.
Sadly the alternative to attnding the AA session is a heavy fine and possible jail time. I believe it is in ypur best interest to attend tghe AA sessions.
Answer Applies to: District of Columbia
Replied: 3/12/2012
The Short Law Group, P.C.
The Short Law Group, P.C. | Shawn Kollie
Under Oregon Law you have the right to choose your treatment provider so long as it is a certified program. However, by refusing to participate in Alcohol Treatment classes you will likely either be violating the court ordered probation, or the Diversion Agreement you had with the courts. If you have already missed some classes call your DUI Lawyer to help resolve these problems as best they can to avoid any too severe of a sentence on a probation violation or diversion revocation.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 3/12/2012
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    The alternative for not attending the AA sessions ordered by the court is incarceration. If you are not comfortable with AA sessions you almost certainly would not be comfortable with jail.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 3/12/2012
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A.
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A. | Donald L. Blaszka, Jr.
    Unfortunately, your lawyer is correct. If the Impaired Driver Intervention Program issues a report after your exit interview that you attend AA meetings, then you will have to attend AA meetings and provide proof of your attendance prior to the Impaired Driver Intervention Program ordering that you have completed the program and informing the Department of Safety that you did complete the program. You could ask Impaired Driver Intervention Program if there are any other alternatives to attending AA meetings.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 3/12/2012
    Law Office of William L Spern | William Spern
    The alternative to not attending AA sessions is jail because the court may and probably will consider your failure to attend AA sessions a violation of probation.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/12/2012
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    Why do you refuse? There may be a valid religious objection but the judge may give you a less fun alternative.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 3/12/2012
    Law Office of Michael R. Garber
    Law Office of Michael R. Garber | Michael R. Garber
    Do what your lawyer says.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 6/19/2013
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    If you are required to attend AA as a condition of probation, and you do not, the worst that can happened is the Probation Officer tells the Judge and you are sent to jail. Best case, the Probation Officer tells the Judge, the Judge yells at you and tells you to go to AA meetings since you signed a contract for probation that says you will do just that. As for alternatives, none to my knowledge. Ask your lawyer or your Probation Officer.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    The alternative to AA is to sit in jail. This is your choice, jail or AA, which will it be. Jail is pretty uncomfortable.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    The fact that you are refusing strongly suggests that you have a drinking problem. Denial ain't just a river in Egypt. Depending on the resources in your community, you may be able to locate a SMART Recovery Group. They are the best alternative to AA and recognized by many courts. But let me give you the same advice my mom gave me in 9th grade when I was frustrated with my junior high teachers. "Play the game. It doesn't last forever and your life will be much easier if you recognize that the teachers hold your fate in their hands for now. In a few years, you will graduate and no longer have to play the game." When you break the law, the court owns you. Play their game until they no longer own you. I would also say, if you attend AA, do so with an open mind and an earnest desire to address your drinking. Even if you don't have a problem, there is wisdom in what they teach.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You must either attend the AA sessions or ask your lawyer to get the judge to agree to alternative counseling at Horizon Human Services or with a psychologist or other counselor. That will either be paid by you or your insurance company, but is is expensive. You are lucky that you did not get a jail term or a year in drug court which can result in a jail sentence if you violate the drug court contract. You are complaining about going to counsel ling at AA but it could have been much worse. If you do not want to have a judge tell you what to do try not getting arrested.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    If you fail to comply with a condition of sentencing a warrant will be issued for your arrest, you will be remanded, put in jail, and re-sentenced.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    If you violate an order of the court/probation conditions, your probation will likely be violated and your would be sentenced to jail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Tennison & Soberon-Llort, PL | Christina Soberon-Llort
    If this was a condition of probation, then your probation will be violated as a result of not attending AA sessions, and you can face the same jail penalties as if you had not been placed on probation.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Williams & Pine, LLC | Wallace J. Williams
    Go to the AA meetings. Why risk contempt or violation of probation/parole because you are uncomfortable. Jail is much less comfortable than an AA meeting.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Healan Law Offices
    Healan Law Offices | William D. Healan, III
    If you are ordered by a judge to attend an AA session and you don't, you will likely go to jail.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    If you refuse to attend court ordered AA which has been ordered as a condition of probation, then your probation can be revoked. You do not have choices except attend or be subject to revocation.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Offices of Douglas J. Lindsay
    Law Offices of Douglas J. Lindsay | Douglas J. Lindsay
    Your lawyer is correct. If the Court ordered you to attend AA and you refuse to go, the Court has the very strong option of putting you in jail for a period of time, within the its discretion, and the law. No doubt your AA attendance (or lack thereof) is being monitored by the Court's probation Department. Alternatives to AA are available but would have to be approved by the Court, upon proper petition or application.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    The alternative is you go to jail with bail set. Once you pay the bail you can be released and not do AAs. Worth it? Not in a million years.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    What happens if you do not comply with a court order depends on the type of order. The bottom line is that there will be consequences unless you get the order modified by the court. There are other types of so-called self help groups, but if the judge ordered AA, which they technically can't do, then you are stuck.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    If it was ordered by the court and is part of your sentence, you best attend. If you do not, it is considered a violation of the terms of your probation/sentence and the judge could order you to serve jail time. If you are "uncomfortable" and you have a legit reason, then a judge might allow some modification of your sentence, but that requires you top get the court's consent, which requires you to file a motion. I do not know your circumstances. This is best done with the assistance of your attorney. Generally, the courts do not modify UNLESS there are very good reasons for doing so. Simply being "uncomfortable" is not sufficient.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    If you don?t comply with all terms of your sentencing and probation, you will be ?violated? and returned to court for sentencing and jail. For actual legal advice, either talk to your lawyer, or hire a new lawyer. If serious about hiring counsel to help in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. Yes, there are alternatives that MAY be possible, but it will be a fight with the DA and court.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    Because AA meetings are based on religious principals, often the court will indicate that you must attend AA meetings or other self-help meetings. Your lawyer - the one you hired and paid - should be helping you with this.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Anthony Saunders Esq., PLLC | Anthony M. Saunders
    Unfortunately, if you are under a judges order, you must comply with it. The only way to seek a way out of it is to go back into court and ask for an alternative method of counseling. However, you will need a really good reason for this change and until a judge orders you otherwise you should attend all sessions in order to comply with the original order. In most cases, you will have to hire an attorney to seek the change and this will cost you more money. My advice would be to attend the sessions.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    If you don't and it is a term of probation, then you are violating probation and will be exposed to the maximum sentence. You shouldn't have signed up for it in the first place. You're SOL now.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Salladay Law Office | Lance Salladay
    If AA is a condition of your probation you had better attend unless and until you can get a change in conditions, which may or may not be allowed by the judge. There are some alternatives to AA which might be able to be substituted.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    After you refuse, the probation officer will violate you
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    A Declaration of Delinquency can be issued and you can be resentenced to harsher terms.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    The Law Office of Stephanie M. Arrache
    The Law Office of Stephanie M. Arrache | Stephanie Arrache
    You could see if the court would allow you to do private therapy classes. But, if he or she is requiring AA, then you need to go. Otherwise, you will violate your probation. Or if your case is still pending, and the judge is ordering it as a condition of your OR release, he could revoke that and take you into custody.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Jason Overton, Attorney at Law
    Jason Overton, Attorney at Law | Jason Overton
    You will probably be charged with Failure To Comply With A Court Order, be arrested again, be required to post bond, go back before the judge to explain how AA meetings were too burdensome for you, then take the judge's sentence of an additional fine (at best) or jail time. After this, you'll probably still be required to attend the AA meetings. It seems that AA meetings would be much more "comfortable" than serving your sentence in jail, but if not, that may be an option.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    You have a lawyer, ask him to suggest a possible alternative to AA, although I doubt that you will find any reasonable alternative. If you fail to abide by the court's order, you may find yourself serving time in the gray-bar hotel, so I would suggest you attend the AA sessions, or your freedom may be in serious jeopardy. Talk to your lawyer, maybe he can make a motion to bring the matter before the judge for a possible resolution, before you find yourself with a violation, and going to jail.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Office of Michael Bialys THE DUI MAN
    Law Office of Michael Bialys THE DUI MAN | Michael Bialys
    If it is court ordered and you don o t attend, you are likely looking at having the court issue a warrant or setting bail and having to pay bail as a condition of your release.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
    AA is a religious organization. Court has to give you secular alternative. If not, can't force you to go. Make a freedom of religion argument.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Pingelton Law Firm | Dan Pingelton
    If AA was a condition of your probation, you could be found in violation of your probation, and sentence imposed. If your sentence included jail, then you could go to jail. Maybe you prefer jail to AA. Follow you lawyer's advice.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    No real alternative to AA meeting that I am aware of. Sorry, they will revoke you for failure to attend.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Yes. Jail is an alternative for violation of a court order which you have in this case.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq.
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq. | Kelly Broadbent
    You will be violated and could be sent to jail. Listen to your lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    Robert Mortland
    Robert Mortland | Law Office of Robert Mortland
    There are not any real alternatives to AA meetings. You could get the SCRAM bracelet instead but this is not what your lawyer asked for and likely not what the judge wants. Talk to your lawyer about this. The other alternative I can think of is jail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    H. Scott Basham, Attorney at Law, P.C. | H. Scott Basham
    If you refuse to attend, neither the judge nor prosecutor will be happy with you. Listen to your lawyer. His job is to keep you out of trouble.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/9/2012
    The Law Offices of Jaime Cowan
    The Law Offices of Jaime Cowan | Jaime Cowan
    If the court ordered the sessions you have to go. If you do not you could face jail.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 3/8/2012
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law | Edward A. Kroll
    If you have been required by the court to go to an AA meeting, then you have to go. Failing to do so will get you in trouble with the court. If you can find an alternative program to go to, perhaps your lawyer can set a hearing and ask the judge if the alternative program would be ok. But until then, you need to do what the court tells you. Otherwise, you can be in violation of your probation and/or release conditions, and be sent to jail. Your lawyer is right. Do what the court says.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 3/8/2012
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