What happens if I got married within the six month stay that was given to me? 16 Answers as of June 25, 2013

What if you went to the US as a tourist and you got married with a US citizen within the 6 months stay that was given to you? Would it affect the processing of your green card?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
All American Immigration
All American Immigration | Tom Youngjohn
I will assume that you are inside the US? If that is true, the rule of thumb, the perceived wisdom in the profession of immigration attorneys is that one should not marry within the first three months, or first two months, depending on which attorney one speaks with. That being said, I've handled a gut shuddering marriage-based green card case where they got married two days after entry. There was not a problem. It's always smart to get a second opinion.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 10/6/2011
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC | Lynne Feldman
As long as this wasn't a preconceived intent and you don't get married within the first 60 days it should be fine. I recommend qualified immigration counsel to guide you through the process as there are lots of landmines.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/15/2011
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Reza Athari
You may apply for adjustment of status and not worry about the expiration of your stay.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 9/14/2011
Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C.
Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C. | David Nabow Soloway
In general, a marriage relatively soon after a person has entered the U.S. on a nonimmigrant visitor's visa may lead the USCIS to be suspicious about the "nonimmigrant intent" of the applicant when he/she entered the country. A visitor's visa may be used only by someone who intends (1) to enter the U.S. temporarily for the purpose of visiting, and (2) upon completion of that purpose to return abroad. Of course, it is not uncommon for someone to enter with the proper nonimmigrant intention and then change his/her mind. The key to success usually involves the best possible documentary evidence of the actual nonimmigrant intent at the time of entry, followed by a reasonable change of circumstances that led to a change of intention.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 9/14/2011
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law | Linda Liang
Your intent for B1 visa will be questioned and your credibility will be questioned as well. You should hire an attorney to help you in your petition to avoid denial.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 9/14/2011
    Christian Schmidt, Attorney at Law
    Christian Schmidt, Attorney at Law | Christian Schmidt
    Not if you apply through the marriage.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/25/2013
    Law Offices of Alan R. Diamante, APLC
    Law Offices of Alan R. Diamante, APLC | Alan R. Diamante
    As long as no fraud is committed, someone can always choose to marry within the six months of entering with a b-2 visa.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/14/2011
    Fong & Associates
    Fong & Associates | William D. Fong
    Generally it would not negatively affect the permanent residency, if you did not enter the US with the intention to marry a US citizen and file for permanent residence. You should be prepared to answer that question at the Field Office interview.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 9/14/2011
    Law Office of Christine Troy
    Law Office of Christine Troy | Christine Troy
    If you made the decision after you entered the US, then the person did not have immigrant intent and often can file in the US without leaving the US.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal | Alexander Segal
    Yes, it will impact the decision on your application for adjustment of status. You have the burden of proving you did not intend to immigrate when you entered with a tourist visa. If USCIS believes that you entered with a non-immigrant the U.S. intending to marry, you may be deemed inadmissible.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Law Office of Jaclyn Miller
    Law Office of Jaclyn Miller | Jaclyn Miller
    It should not affect the greencard processing as long as your "intent" when you arrived in the US was to be a tourist and NOT to get married.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Baughman & Wang
    Baughman & Wang | Justin X. Wang
    Should be no problem. Just file all required paper with the USCIS. The only possible issue is when you applied for non-immigrant visa if you lied about your girlfriend.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Hans Burgos, P.A., Immigration Law Offices
    Hans Burgos, P.A., Immigration Law Offices | Hans Burgos
    No, it would not affect the processing.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/25/2013
    Joseph Law Firm
    Joseph Law Firm | Jeff Joseph
    If you committed misrepresentation regarding your intentions on entry then you could be found inadmissible to the United States for such misrepresentation. However, there is a waiver available if you can demonstrate extreme hardship to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident spouse. If you did not commit misrepresentation on entry and your intentions simply changed once you entered, then the fact that you get married after entry as a tourist should not affect an application for permanent residence. We would be happy to assist you with this. Please contact our office to schedule an appointment with one of our attorneys.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Kriezelman, Burton & Associates | Matthew Scott Kriezelman
    It may change the processing but it depends on the situation. You should speak with an experienced immigration attorney about the exact circumstances.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/13/2011
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney