What happens if I don’t show up to court if I no longer want to purse with the case that was opened for domestic violence? 3 Answers as of March 22, 2017

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Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
It is not up to you or any victim whether the charges that are being pursued in a domestic violence case will be dropped or pursued. While your opinion matters if you do not appear in court a warrant or an order to show cause for you to be held in contempt of court can be pursued. In your situation retaining your own attorney is the best course of action. If you cannot afford to do so in limited circumstances the court can appoint an attorney for you but that is usually only when you have some criminal liability yourself arising out of the case.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/22/2017
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
It depends on whether or not you're subpoenaed. If you were or are served with a subpoena, which is a court order to appear in court on a certain date and at a certain time, you are required to appear in court on the date stated on the subpoena. Failure to do so can result in the judge issuing a bench warrant or body attachment for your arrest. The police will be looking for you and when found will arrest you and eventually bring you to court to explain to the judge why you disobeyed the subpoena. The court can find you in contempt of court and sentence you to jail. If you refuse to testify, the court can also find you in contempt and sentence you to jail. If you are out of state and are stopped by the police, they can arrest you based on the original state's warrant and possibly extradite you back to the original state.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/21/2017
Law Office of Jeff Yeh
Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
It doesn't work like that. Prosecutors will never drop charges just because the victim has had a change of heart/story. The fact is, in 95% of all DV cases the parties reconcile, and prosecutors are well aware of this. The accused needs a good lawyer.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/21/2017
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