What grounds can you file for a divorce? 44 Answers as of August 17, 2011

I have been married for a few years and I want out. I'm tired of being married and I am very unhappy. Can I use this as a reason to get a divorce? or do I have to have a more substantial reason?

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Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
Texas recognizes "irrconcilable differences" as grounds for divorce. As I have always described it, it takes two to make a marriage work and only one to quit.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 8/11/2011
Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
Connecticut is a no fault state. That means that you don't need grounds - you can just state that the marriage has broken down completely with no chance of getting back together.
Answer Applies to: Connecticut
Replied: 8/10/2011
Advanced Litigation Services
Advanced Litigation Services | Joseph Iarussi
No Nevada is a No Fault State,You can simply allege "irreconcilable differences"
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/10/2011
Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law
Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law | Neville J. Bedford
In a no fault jurisdiction like Rhode Island, that is reason enough (tired of being married and I am very unhappy - also called "Irreconcilable Differences that have led to the irretrievable breakdown of the marriage")
Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
Replied: 8/9/2011
John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
In Colorado the only criteria for divorce is that the "marriage is irretrievably broken". Simplistically, this only means that one spouse no longer desires to remain married.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 8/8/2011
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    You can use ORC 3105.01(k) irreconcilable difference. Please contact a domestic relations attorney to discuss this issue in greater detail.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 8/8/2011
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner | Roianne Houlton Conner
    Yes, in Alabama we have no fault divorce in which you allege that you have irreconcilable differences.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/8/2011
    Donaldson Stewart, PC
    Donaldson Stewart, PC | Monica H. Donaldson Stewart
    In Arizona, the only grounds for divorce are that "the marriage is irretrievably broken with no reasonable prospect of reconciliation." You do not have to prove any other cause.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 8/7/2011
    ROWE LAW FIRM
    ROWE LAW FIRM | Jeffrey S. Wittenbrink
    You may get divorced for any reason. However, if your spouse is not at fault in the breakup of the marriage, they may sue you for permanent support if they are in necessitous circumstances because of the divorce. Your spouse may sue you for support for up to three years after the marriage, or three years after any voluntary payment of support made by you.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni | Jay W. Neff
    In the state of Washington, you do not need "grounds" to get a divorce. You only need to be willing to swear that the marriage is "irretrievably broken."
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    The Coyle Law Office
    The Coyle Law Office | T. Andrew Coyle
    There are two avenues for requesting divorce: (1) No-fault - which requires you live separate and apart for two years if your spouse will not agree to divorce or that you live separate and apart for 6 months if they do agree; and (2) Fault - the faults you can use are listed in the Illinois divorce statute, but the most common one used would be "repeated mental cruelty".
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Fox Law Firm LLC
    Fox Law Firm LLC | Tina Fox
    It sounds like you need to file under irreconcilable differences. You may call the office today to discuss this options and other options as a grounds for divorce in Illinois. We offer free 30 minute confidential consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    No "grounds" for divorce are necessary. All that is required is that one party must believe there has been an irretrievable breakdown of the marital relationship.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Lewis, Pfanstiel & Williams, PCLO
    Lewis, Pfanstiel & Williams, PCLO | Ryan J. Lewis
    Nebraska is a no fault divorce state. You do not have to have a reason why you want a divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Vincent J. Bernabei LLC
    Vincent J. Bernabei LLC | Vincent J. Bernabei
    You can file for divorce for any reason or no reason at all. The legal standard is irreconcilable differences. Oregon is a no fault divorce state.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    Generally, in Georgia, no fault grounds must be alleged. Generally, it is sufficient if the marriage is irretrievably broken. Retain a divorce lawyer and discuss all your rights and options. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Meriwether & Tharp LLC
    Meriwether & Tharp LLC | Patrick Meriwether
    The below lists out all the possible grounds for a divorce in Georgia. The most common ground from the list below is that the marriage is irretrievably broken due to irreconcilable differences. (1) Intermarriage by persons within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity or affinity; (2) Mental incapacity at the time of the marriage; (3) Impotency at the time of the marriage; (4) Force, menace, duress, or fraud in obtaining the marriage; (5) Pregnancy of the wife by a man other than the husband, at the time of the marriage, unknown to the husband; (6) Adultery in either of the parties after marriage; (7) Willful and continued desertion by either of the parties for the term of one year; (8) The conviction of either party for an offense involving moral turpitude, under which he is sentenced to imprisonment in a penal institution for a term of two years or longer; (9) Habitual intoxication; (10) Cruel treatment, which shall consist of the willful infliction of pain, bodily or mental, upon the complaining party, such as reasonably justifies apprehension of danger to life, limb, or health; (11) Incurable mental illness. No divorce shall be granted upon this ground unless the mentally ill party has been adjudged mentally ill by a court of competent jurisdiction or has been certified to be mentally ill by two physicians who have personally examined the party; and he has been confined in an institution for the mentally ill or has been under continuous treatment for mental illness for a period of at least two years immediately preceding the commencement of the action; and the superintendent or other chief executive officer of the institution and one competent physician appointed by the court, after a thorough examination, make a certified statement under oath that it is their opinion that the party evidences such a want of reason, memory, and intelligence as to prevent the party from comprehending the nature, duties, and consequences of the marriage relationship and that, in the light of present day medical knowledge, recovery of the party's mental health cannot be expected at any time during his life. Notice of the action must be served upon the guardian of the person of the mentally ill person and upon the superintendent or other chief executive officer of the institution in which the person is confined. In the event that there is no guardian of the person, then notice of the action shall be served upon a guardian ad litem, who shall be appointed by the court in which the divorce action is filed, and upon the superintendent or chief executive officer of the institution in which the person is confined. The guardian and superintendent shall be entitled to appear and be heard upon the issues. The status of the parties as to the support and maintenance of the mentally ill person shall not be altered in any way by the granting of the divorce; (12) Habitual drug addiction, which shall consist of addiction to any controlled substance as defined in Article 2 of Chapter 13 of Title 16; (13) The marriage is irretrievably broken. Under no circumstances shall the court grant a divorce on this ground until not less than 30 days from the date of service on the respondent.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    CT is a no-fault state so you do not need any reason other than irretrievable breakdown of the marriage
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A.
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A. | Joanna Mitchell
    Florida is a no fault state. It is enough that you don't love your spouse anymore and no longer want to be married. Hence, the marriage is "irretrievably broken." You do not need any other grounds.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Law Office of Aubrey Srednicki
    Law Office of Aubrey Srednicki | Aubrey Srednicki
    In Arizona, if you have a non-covenant marriage, your marriage must be "irretrievably broken with no reasonable prospect of reconciliation."
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Horizons Law Group, LLC
    Horizons Law Group, LLC | Michelle B. Fitzgerald
    Wisconsin does not require a reason.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A.
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A. | Michael D. Fluke
    All you have to allege is that the marriage is irretrievably broken and that no amount of counseling will fix it. Florida is a no fault state. I suggest you consult a local Family Law attorney to discuss your case in greater detail and learn all of your rights and options. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    There are several grounds for divorce in Arkansas such as adultery, failure to support, drunkenness, being in prison for a year or more, and so on, most people just allege general indignities. At the final hearing the judge may ask for specifics but usually that is not a problem.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Law Offices of Paul A. Eads, A.P.C.
    Law Offices of Paul A. Eads, A.P.C. | Paul A. Eads
    Yes. Check the box for irreconcilable differences and move on.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Law Office of Patricia Van Haren
    Law Office of Patricia Van Haren | Patricia Van Haren
    California is a no fault state, which means that you do not need to show any grounds in order to get a divorce. The only grounds required are "irreconcilable differences."
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Paul Wallin
    You are in luck. The law in California is you can file for divorce and you DO NOT HAVE TO PROVIDE ANY SPECIFIC REASON.... So you can file at anytime.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Michael Apicella
    Michael Apicella | Apicella Law and Mediation
    California is a "no fault" state. Meaning, that the reason for divorce is irrelevant. On page 2 of the Divorce Petition (form FL-100), you simply check a box indicating "irreconcilable difference." If you need further assistance, it is advisable to consult with a local family law lawyer. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Eranthe Law Firm
    Eranthe Law Firm | Cate Eranthe
    California is a no fault divorce state. You only need irreconcilable differences that cause the irremediable breakdown of the marriage.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/5/2011
    Beresford Booth PLLC
    Beresford Booth PLLC | S. Scott Burkhalter
    You do not need a reason in Washington State; just the "marriage is irretrievably broken."
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/5/2011
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