What does a person who did over $12,400 of property damage would get as a sentence if found guilty? 22 Answers as of September 27, 2012

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Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
At least probation and have to pay back all the damges. Possibly jail or prison.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/27/2012
Blough Law Office | Janis L. Blough
Regardless of the crime of which that person is convicted, the victim can and should ask that part of the sentence require restitution based on documented costs of repair or replacement of the damaged property. The victim also has a civil action available. Good luck!
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/27/2012
Law Offices of John Carney
Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
If you have no prior record and can pay the restitution a good lawyer may be able to negotiate a sentence to 5 years probation with a monthly payment. If you pay the restitution you should not serve any jail time.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 9/26/2012
Timothy J. Thill P.C.
Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
It depends on your criminal background. If you are clean, you will possibly get probation, but expect to pay restitution for the damages you caused. If you have any background of significance, you will do prison time for this crime. Hire the best possible attorney you can, you will need him.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 9/26/2012
Law Office of Mark Bruce
Law Office of Mark Bruce | Mark Corwin Bruce
What did that person do? Vandalism? There is felony vandalism. Depending on the record, it will likely go for probation, maybe a little jail time or a fine, and restitution.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/26/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    Sentencing in WA is based on the seriousness level of the crime and one's criminal history. As you might imagine the standard range increases for more serious crimes and for those with criminal history. Without knowing the history, I cannot tell you the standard range.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/26/2012
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Depends upon the charges actually filed, and either a plea bargain or sentencing by the judge after trial. Every crime carries potential jail or prison upon conviction. The honest answer is that no attorney can predict the outcome, nor even give an intelligent opinion, without reviewing and knowing all the charges, evidence, police reports, expected testimony, priors history, etc. You'll learn the actual charge[s] filed and any enhancements, priors, or violations alleged, and get copies of all the police reports and prosecutors evidence upon arraignment at the first court hearing. If it is you or yours being charged, the proper questions are, can any evidence obtained in a search or statement be used against you, can you be convicted, and what can you do? aise all appropriate defenses with whatever witnesses, evidence and sympathies are available for legal and factual arguments, for evidence suppression, search and seizure, or other motions, or for trial. If you don't know how to represent yourself effectively against an experienced prosecutor intending to convict, then hire an attorney who does, who will try to get a dismissal, charge reduction, diversion, programs, or other decent outcome through motions, plea bargain, or take it to trial if appropriate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
    You could get prison in California. If you can pay for the damages, you could get a reduced sentence.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    Most likely probation and an order to repay the damages.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    It depends on the prior criminal history, the victim, the prosecutor and the expereince of the criminal defense attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    The result will depend on many things. If a juvenile, then there are a number of potions. If an adult, there are still some options, but it will depend on a number of things. In either situation, the record of the person, the disposition of the property (e.g. whether there is insurance, etc), and the motivation of the victim(s) will come into play. The best advice is to discuss this with your attorney when you are charged. Discussions about sentencing guidelines, diversion, 771.1 or other options can be discussed.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    I do not know enough about your case.... was alcohol involved? were you charged with DUI??... what are the underlying facts?? $12,400 sounds like a felony charge..... do you have any prior criminal history. I would need answers to all these questions.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Depends on the person's felony history but it's not absolute.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    This could be a felony but can be pled down. If no other record, likely probation with payment of restitution.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD | Mace Yampolsky
    This depends please consult an attorney properly.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    It would be a felony, but the sentence could vary do to other variables.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Attorney at Law | Michael P. Vollandt
    Restitution for sure and some substantial jail time if not prison.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law | Gary Moore
    He could go to jail, but also, could get probation.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Felony vandalism with state prison sentence.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Douglas M. Philpott, P.C. | Peter J. Philpott
    Maybe jail, probation, and will have to pay restitution.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    The maximum would be 5 years in prison, but that is not likely, and more facts need to be known before an answer can be given. What, exactly, are the charges?
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    The answer depends on many things, including the particular facts of the case, the person's age, mitigating circumstances and more. You must have the case reviewed by legal counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/24/2012
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