What do I do if my former employer is accusing me of stealing money? 27 Answers as of June 13, 2011

I managed a storage facility. From November to February, we were cleaning the mess of a former manager which meant giving free rent to several tenants. I just quit and 2 weeks later they are saying all of the rent concessions I made were really paid in cash and I stole the money. What do I do?

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Clifford Clendenin & O'Hale, LLP
Clifford Clendenin & O'Hale, LLP | Locke T. Clifford
Don't say anything to the Police if they contact you and don't admit anything to your former employer. If a detective can establish probable cause that you stole any money before a magistrate, you will be charged with embezzlement and will need to get an attorney.
Answer Applies to: North Carolina
Replied: 6/13/2011
Eversole Law, LLC
Eversole Law, LLC | Steven Eversole
You need to contact and retain a lawyer immediately. Do not make any statements about the facts of this case to anyone other than your lawyer. Good Luck.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 4/11/2011
The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones
The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones | B. Elaine Jones
There really isn't anything that you can do until the police try to question you. If that happens, I would suggest that you hire an attorney to go with you or be present during questioning to assist you. If you need further consultation or assistance please feel free to contact my office at the contact information listed with this response.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 3/23/2011
The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
Whenever someone has begun to make accusations against you, you should retain an experienced attorney. Do not wait until police and employers have spoken to you or the complaint has been filed. Hire an experienced attorney now. Many times, people hire an attorney after they have done, or not done, many things that later haunt them in criminal proceeding. Hiring an attorney before charges are filed could save you a lot of trouble later.
Answer Applies to: Hawaii
Replied: 3/23/2011
Harris Law Firm
Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
Please remember, that at any time during a criminal investigation, you have the right to remain silent. That means you do not have to speak with law enforcement. You may want to consider hiring an attorney to represent you during the investigation. The attorney would be the liaison between you and law enforcement and make sure your rights are protected.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 3/22/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    Unless criminal and/or civil charges are being filed against you then there really isn't anything to do. If you suspect that charges will, in fact, be brought against you then you will likely need to hire a defense attorney who will be able to work with you and the details of your case to craft a defense strategy and hopefully keep you out of court. If you are seeking legal representation in this matter in the state of Louisiana, we invite you to contact our firm at the information on this page for a free case evaluation to determine whether we would be able to assist you.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 3/22/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    You will need a lawyer to represent you and fight the false claims.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 3/22/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    Please listen to me when I tell you that it is iportant that you retain an experienced criminal attorney as soon as possible to represent you and to advise you as to all your rights and options. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    I would contact a criminal defense attorney and try to negotiate a settlement with your employer before he calls the police. Once he does any resolution short of a criminal charge may not be possible.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Law Office of Michael E. Hendrickson
    Law Office of Michael E. Hendrickson | Michael E. Hendrickson
    Get a competent criminal defense counsel to defend you and in the meantime discuss the case with no one.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Look for a new job and get ready to defend criminal charges they may file if they think there is sufficient proof to do so.

    The ONLY specific advice you should expect to get from here or elsewhere is to exercise your 5th Amendment rights to SHUT UP, hire an attorney, and do NOT talk to anyone except your attorney about the case. With ANY crime being investigated, you potentially face charges that could put in jail/prison. Most police and prosecutors will happily tell you that 95% of people convict themselves by trying to be 'helpful and cooperative'. There is no magic wand to make this go away. Police and prosecutors don't take the time to research, prepare and file charges just to drop them. Unless you know how to effectively represent yourself in court against a professional prosecutor intending to convict you, hire an attorney who does. If this is in SoCAL courts, and if youre serious about hiring counsel, feel free to contact me.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Ferguson & Ferguson
    Ferguson & Ferguson | Randy W. Ferguson
    Get an attorney. Do not talk to anyone including police.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Do not respond to the accusations personally. Hire an attorney and an investigator. That keeps information and witness statements "clean" and arguably above reproach. You might want to insure copies of your bank and other financial transaction records are preserved. Under no cirumstance should you speak with a cop.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law | Edward A. Kroll
    What you need to do is to get a good lawyer. Don't talk to the police about this or try to prove your innocence. Your words and actions can be used against you. If the police are not yet involved, then talking to a lawyer is still a very good idea. A lawyer can help make sure that charges do not get filed, and that you remain free to live your life.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Ron Graham Attorney at Law
    Ron Graham Attorney at Law | Ron Graham
    Do not talk to the police or anyone.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    It depends on whether you had the authority to give free storage. If you were not permitted to do so then you may have committed a crime. If you took money and did not turn it over then you also committed a crime. Either way it is going to depend on what the tenants say happened. You should retain an attorney to negotiate with your employer and represent you if you are arrested. Do not try to handle the matter yourself or make any statements to your employer or the police.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    deny the allegations as untrue
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    Consult a criminal defense lawyer immediately.If a complaint is made to the police, you can be investigated, and possibly charged with grand larceny. A lawyer will advise you what you should do immediately, including invoking your right to remain silent, even if innocent.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    There's nothing you can do, or, at least, there's nothing that you should do. Don't talk to your old employer. Don't talk to the police. You have the right to remain silent. Use it. If the police come talk to you, tell them that you don't want to talk to them. If they continue, say that you want a lawyer. Don't consent to a search of anything. Don't talk. Don't argue. Don't explain. Don't apologize. Don't call your old employer and offer to pay them back. No matter how bad it is (which I don't know, and you probably don't know) talking to the police can only make it worse. You're entitled to a court-appointed lawyer if you can't afford one and if you are actually charged. It sounds like you're not charged and you aren't entitled to a court-appointed lawyer yet. A lawyer might be able to help you here, by, for example, arranging a civil compromise with the store. But you shouldn't try to do that on your own, because what you say might be used against you at trial if you don't come to an agreement. So, if you can afford to hire a lawyer, you should consider doing so.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    There is nothing to do. Keep a record of all of your bank accounts, and try and get in touch with the folks that you supposedly collected cash from in order that they might testify on your behalf. You should learn from this experience when seeking employment elsewhere. Don't talk to the police.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    Any criminal complaints must be made to the police. If they do that, you can voluntarily talk to the police or get a lawyer. Otherwise it's just between you and the employer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    The best thing to do is to hire a lawyer to oversee your defense which should include getting legitimate Affidavits from those very tenants that they now claim you took cash from. If they will verify that you gave them concessions instead of taking cash rental payments, that should put a quick end to the owner's claims. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Do not speak to anyone but your own attorney. If you need to speak with someone, click in the link to the left and call me to discuss in confidence.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Mercado & Hartung
    Mercado & Hartung | Stephanie Hartung
    Do not make any statements to the police or investigators without an attorney present. Gather any documents/statements you have in support of your position just in case it becomes necessary. The company should have detailed records of the tenants, if the police do an investigation they will likely contact those tenants and inuquire if they in fact paid rent. If they didn't pay you anything that should be revealed.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/21/2011
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