What do I do if a girl is accusing me of assault? 63 Answers as of August 24, 2011

Myself and a female were drinking at a party, and we later had sexual intercourse that was consensual. She told her boyfriend that she only remembers me being on top of her and then she went to the police. I have talked to one lawyer that told me to call the county police and give my statement so the investigator has both sides of the story but another lawyer told me to stay silent. I dont know what to do.

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Austin Legal Services, PLC
Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
There will be differing opinions on this as you have already found out. Personally and from a professional standpoint, I don't see much good that can come from you giving a statement to the police. It should be obvious and presumed that you are going to deny that the incident was anything but consensual. For now, all they have is her word with probably very little else if anything. It is their job to find someone to press charges against. The police will not be working to exonerate you. If they have nothing else to go on but the statement of a drunk complaining witness, it's unlikely the case will go anywhere because that just isn't enough to prove guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. I would exercise your right to remain silent if I was you.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/24/2011
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
I'd recommend retaining an attorney. What you say can and will be used against you. If you do anything with the police, make sure it is part of some coordinated effort regarding your potential defense. I would advise that you fully retain a lawyer and consult with them for advice for your particular circumstances.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/17/2011
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
It is not an easy choice, however I would wait to see if you get charged and if so then hire an attorney.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 8/13/2011
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
Most criminal lawyers would give you advice to use your rights against self incrimination and remain silent. However, if you believe it serves you best to give your statement to the police, then be prepared to have your words used against you if they decide to charge the assault.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 8/11/2011
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
I would not retain the first attorney you describe. That is for sure. Without knowing everything the police believe is true as a result of their investigation it is usually not a good idea to make a statement to the police where they are investigating you for a crime. I would hire a good certified criminal law specialist and have him available should you be contacted by the police or charged and arrested for a crime.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/11/2011
    Michael R. Nack, Attorney at Law
    Michael R. Nack, Attorney at Law | Michael R. Nack
    I strongly advise you not to make any statements to the police or answer any questions if you are taken into custody for questioning or otherwise. Th police are not interested in getting your side of the story. They are only interested in developing enough evidence to charge and convict you. The attorney who advised you to go talk to the police is just plain wrong.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 8/11/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    Both attorneys have given sound advice, albeit differing opinions. I would suggest that you do not answer any questions if arrested. Police are known for intimidating suspects, and that may occur when questioned. Also, you might say something or lured into admitting the crime, so if summoned, retain counsel to accompany you into the station. He will know how to steer the proceeding properly.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/11/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    My advice is to hire an attorney and tell him or her what happened and he or she will decide what to tell the cops. On the one hand, I think it's suicide for a "suspect" to talk to the police without an attorney present and then only to tell them what you and the attorney decide to tell them. On the other hand, it would be better to get your story out early on and stick to it. If it was consensual, it's a good idea to let the cops know. The other potential land mine is the issue of consent. If the alleged victim was so drunk as to not know or appreciate what she was saying yes to, it would be best if you remained silent all together. As you can see from the above, you really need to hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/11/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    Thank you for your inquiry If you do not hire an attorney, then free advice, like advice you get over the Internet, is not very useful. It is worth every penny you pay for the advice. You should hire an attorney to represent you. You could be facing a CSC 1st charge, which could involve a prison sentence! This is not the time to be frugal and try to go it alone. This could be a life-changing charge. Should you make a statement, you may be giving the police the missing information which will result in a charge or conviction. How would you know without your attorney sitting next to you when the questions are being asked? I hope that this was helpful.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/11/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Hire the attorney who told you to be quiet and say nothing to the authorities. The rumor is that Tyson was convicted because he gave a statement confirming he had sex with the complaining witness. His attorney took him to the police to have his side of the story told. Cops are not there to hear your side of the story. They are interested in getting you to say those things that would convict you. Sex with an intoxicated person is rape, 3, 6, 8 years potential in prison, life time registration as a sex offender, severe restrictions on where you can live AND the possibility of some PH.d. saying that you are a sexually violent predator and should be in a hospital for the rest of your life.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    Stay silent. It is up to the police to make a case against you. You don't have to help them. That's the right to remain silent you hear about on all the cop shows.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner | Roianne Houlton Conner
    You need to retain an attorney who will go with you to talk with the police.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    If you know that the girl has gone to the police already and that charges may be pending, then you will want to actually hire an attorney to defend you in this matter who will be able to proactively work to attempt to keep charges from being picked up the DA. When you hire an attorney to work on your case (not just answering questions) they will be able to develop a comprehensive strategy and advise you how to proceed. If you are seeking legal representation in this matter in Louisiana, I invite you to contact my firm at the information on this page for a free case evaluation.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC
    Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC | Jeffery A. Cojocar
    I would not say a word and if the police contact you, hire counsel immediately.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    It is up to the prosecutor, if charges are filed, to prove his/her case beyond a reasonable doubt. Anything you say can and will be used against you. The advise of the second lawyer is probably the better advise. Until you know what she has said, I would remain silent.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    Stay silent. If you're charged and a warrant is issued for your arrest, or you're arrested, then get an attorney. You could find an attorney you would want to represent you if you're eventually charged, so you'll be ready if it happens rather than waiting.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O.
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O. | Eric R. Chandler
    Go with the second's advice. Do NOT give any statements; stay silent and insist upon having an attorney. Evidence wise, you will only make a bad case good or a good case better by speaking to the prosecution. Never talk to police when you may be a suspect.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    I would advise you to hire an attorney that tells you to keep your mouth shut. He is keeping you from making statements that could possibly be used against you. IE "She was drunk or high but I still had sex with her" or other such statements. People can be too drunk to consent.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Law Office of Nixon Ayemi | Nixon Ayeni
    you do not need to say anything if you are accused of a crime, not saying anything does not make you guilty, however you need to start talking and hiring a lawyer because CSC is a very serious crime and you are looking at serious jail time if you do not defend yourself. How old was this female?
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    Hire a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
    You should decide if you want to hire an attorney, and then discuss your options with the attorney you hire. It is inappropriate for an attorney to interfere with the relationship between a client and his attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Hawaii
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    I would advise waiting for the police to come to you and if they do say you would be happy to talk to them but ask them to contact your attorney to set it up. Only after your attorney gathers what information he/she can would your attorney be in a position to advise you whether to speak to the police. That being said the default in my opi nion is to not speak to the police ever before getting a lawyer especially given the possibility of these types of serious charges.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    I advise you to hire an attorney. Rape is a very serious crime and so is sexual assault. You could end up in jail or having to register with the sex offender registry. These are all harsh situations and it is unfair to give you blanket advice in such an important position. My standard rule of thumb is to never advise a client to speak to police. If there is an exception to this rule, it would only come after speaking to an attorney and probably having that attorney present. The police's job is to gather evidence. That's what they do. They are not there to help you. If they really wanted to help you, they would bother someone else and leave you alone. Hire an attorney for a consultation with the understanding that if you are charged, he will be available to represent you. I would want to know all the facts before I advised you further, but I can tell you this, do not speak with the police until you first speak with an attorney who knows all the facts and who has some experience with Criminal Defense.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Offices of James A Bates
    Law Offices of James A Bates | James A Bates
    The first lawyer was entirely wrong. You should never talk to the police about your case except for rare circumstances with a lawyer present who can direct the questioning. The court decisions have allowed cops to lie to suspects up to a point. These lies are designed to elicit admissions. The best way to avoid those traps is not to talk at all. It is called the 5th Amendment right to remain silent. Use it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    What can you do? Exercise your 5th Amendment right to SHUT UP and do NOT talk to ANYONE about the case except an attorney. That includes on this or any other web site or public forum. Anyone who tells you differently is not giving good advice. Hire an attorney to speak for you and represent in court if needed, unless you know how to effectively represent yourself against a professional prosecutor intending to convict. Most police and prosecutors will happily tell you that 95% of people convict themselves by trying to be 'helpful and cooperative', either during initial contact, questioning, interview or interrogation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/10/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    You should go with your attorney to the police and have them question you with him present. That is your 6 th amendment right. You will recall that that is part of what the police tell you when you are arrested. This and remaining silent are always your best choices.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Bird & Van Dyke, Inc.
    Bird & Van Dyke, Inc. | Mary Ann Bird
    Remain silent.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Be silent. You can only lose by giving a statement. It will be interpreted against you no matter what you say. If and when they contact you, immediately assert your right to have an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    I believe that not speaking to the state is the smartest position. I may advise otherwise if I had sufficient facts, but in almost 20 years I have never advised talking to the police.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    Reasonable minds can differ on how you should proceed. It's ultimately your call and your choice. I am personally of the school of letting sleeping dogs lie and would probably recommend you not contact them unless they contact you. My main reason for that is that you simply don't know what she told the police or how it went down - they may not have found her credible and nothing will come of it. But if it's killing you to know what's going on then you may contact the police and ask or have an attorney do it for you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    Do not say anything to the police without having an attorney with you. At this point there is an investigation and you do not want to make any statements that can be used against you. Also do not make any statements to anyone else either.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A.
    Michael D. Fluke, P.A. | Michael D. Fluke
    I do not let my client's speak to the police. If there is a side of the story that must be known, do so through your attorney. Police tend to take your statement in an effort to build a case against you as opposed to getting to the bottom of the matter. Whatever you decide to do, make sure you have an experienced Criminal Defense attorney at your side.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein | Neal L. Weinstein
    First, hire a good lawyer. Second, hire a good lawyer, third, keep your mouth shut.
    Answer Applies to: Maine
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Criminal sexual conduct is a very serious offense. A conviction may result in lengthy prison sentences. It ,ay also require that a person convicted report as a criminal sexual offender. You should make no statements to police without the representation of counsel. COnsult and hire an attorney immediately.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Harris Law Firm
    Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
    I would recommend you consider hiring counsel to assist you during the investigative phase. I do not recommend that anyone speaks to police when they are unrepresented, especially on a matter as serious as the one you described. Many criminal attorneys handle cases in the investigative stage, most for a minimal hourly fee.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    First, hire a lawyer - don't just call around for free advice. You are potentially in a very, very serious situation. Second, DON'T hire the lawyer who said call and give them a statement. No way. Make sure that the lawyer you hire has experience in criminal cases, and specifically on sexual assault cases. Generally speaking, an "investigation" in a sexual assault case is little more than taking the statement from the complainant and trying to interview the accused so the cops can tie that person down to specific facts or details. They are not going to make a credibility decision. So, if she says you did and you say you didn't, then the case will be submitted to the DA's office who most likely will take charges and then you will have to make bond and appear in court. Generally it isn't a good idea to talk to a cop because you may tend to leave out details which if remembered and added will be called lies at trial; you may remember things differently after you think about it for hours on end as your prepare for trial - again, lies; you may word things in a way that the cop twists to mean something entirely different, etc. Be aware that if the girl was drunk to the point that she did not understand what she was doing or she was confused and thought you were her boyfriend or whatever, you could be convicted because she did not give "effective" consent. Talk to a lawyer right away.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Russman Law
    Russman Law | Ryan Russman
    I would seek legal counsel before speaking with the police. Anything you tell them can be used against you. Please keep in mind that consent can be negated if one of the adults are impaired by alcohol.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
    As a preface, I have handled a number of sexual assault allegations. I recommend not giving a statement to anyone without your lawyer being present and if you cannot afford a lawyer I recommend not giving a statement whatsoever.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law | Eric James Schurman
    You should hire an attorney immediately. Do not speak to police or give a statement until you have retained counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    We recommend that you retain an EXPERIENCED criminal defense attorney, perhaps with prosecution experience, to advise you as to all your rights and options. It might be possible for your lawyer to intervene with the police without your being in direct contact, but, in any event, in our opinion, you should exercise your right to counsel and meet with a lawyer ASAP! Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Harrison & Harrison
    Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
    Go back to the one that told you to stay silent, and pay him/her well. Talking can only make the situation worse.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    While both options are reasonable, as a criminal defense lawyer I'd have to agree with the latter's advice. I would not say anything to anyone and if you are asked to come in for an interview take a lawyer with you. Having a lawyer present doesn't make you look guilty, it lets the police know you take your reputation seriously and that a false accusation can have lifelong professional consequences.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Michael J. Kennedy
    Any lawyer who tells you to talk to the cops in that circumstance is incompetent. It never, ever helps to talk to the cops, at least without the guiding and halting hand of counsel, when they are investigating criminal accusations against you. Never, ever do it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Retain the services of an attorney, who practices criminal law,that you feel comfortable with, and follow his advise. Do not talk with any member of law enforcement without having an attorney present to represent you. The penalities for a sexual assualt (or rape) are severe and include the communitiy notification act where you are limited as to where you can live, require that neighbors be provided with copies of your picture (mug shot)and criminal record wherever you live, and you must register with the Sheriff as much as each month or so. If convicted, the record can be a permanent record and never goes away.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Shane Law Office
    Shane Law Office | Robert J. Shane
    Please do not provide any statements to police officers or investigators regarding the facts of your case. You should not even discuss the case with any other person who may have an axe to grind against you. Any statement you make is called an admission and the person who took the statement or heard you make the statement can testify in court as to what you said, even if you were misunderstood or their recollection is not accurate. A criminal sexual misconduct case is a serious felony level offense. A conviction can be obtained based on the testimony of the victim alone as it does not need to be corroborated by any other evidence. Why give the prosecution a rope to hang you with?
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Offices of Steven R. Decker
    Law Offices of Steven R. Decker | Steven Decker
    It is wiser to remain silent rather than attempting to give a statement to the police. If they had sufficient information to charge you they would have already issued an arrest warrant. Your pre-arrest statement could prove to be incomplete and the prosecution would use that to impeach your later trial testimony.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law | Gary Moore
    Talking to the police is not a good idea. Your words will just be used against you. What the police will do is file a charge against you so long as her story is not too ridiculous, but cooperating with the police will probably not stop them from charging you. Keep your mouth shut because what you say may somehow conform to what she is claiming. It is better to let her tell her story and find out what she claims and THEN tell your story under conditions controlled by your attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    I recommend you stay silent. If she was drunk, she could not legally consent. That is probably her claim. Why make the case easier for the DA? I don't know where you are, but its hard to imagine a detective deciding what really happened. Her claim gives probable cause to arrest you and the detective will likely do that and let the court work it out. I do suggest you retain counsel to contact the police to make you available for surrender as that will help when bail gets argued.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    You should follow the advise of the lawyer who told you to remain silent. By saying anything you are giving the police evidence that it might have happened and maybe what she said is correct. By not speaking with the cops then don't know what you will say and it keeps any possible disclosers from coming out and protects any defenses.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Laguzzi Law, P.C.
    Laguzzi Law, P.C. | Carina Laguzzi
    You can listen to attorneys but technically they cannot give you legal advice unless they represent you. Giving a statement is tricky and any attorney that told you to go in alone to police probably does not do a lot of criminal defense. Having both sides does not mean you wont get charged and there are things you could say that could hurt you(I.e. you could acknowledge sexual intercourse with someone who turns out to be a minor). Remember that words are like bullets, once they are out of your mouth you cannot take it back. Nothing is to say you cannot give a statement later but for now it seems as if you haven't even been charged. If you are, then hire an experienced criminal defense attorney who will guide you on what to do next.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    You do not say what the ages of you or the girl are. I will assume that both of you are of legal age as far as drinking (21) and as far as being a legal adult (18). If either of you is under age in either situation, then my advice may be different. Regardless, I do not advise you speaking with any investigator without FIRST consulting with an attorney. The investigator/police are not necessarily your friend in this situation. They are trying to put a case together, and that could be at your detriment and clearly contrary to your interests. Anything you tell them, can and will be used against you in ant future court proceeding. You may inadvertently admit to something through coercion or simply because you do not understand. The allegation could be true or they may also be made by this girl so she could save face with her boyfriend. In any event, talk with an attorney before you give any statement. The fact that you employ an attorney is not an admission of guilt, but a sign that you want to see that your legal rights are protected.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    The best advice is retain a lawyer and do not give any statements to the police at this time. Any information you need to provide to the police can be done via your attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    Do not speak to the authorities without first speaking to an attorney. Even though you may be tempted to give your side of the story, everything you say can and will be held against you when considering whether to file charges. You have a right to remain silent and this cannot be held against you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Absolutely remain silent. No matter what you say, the cop will twist your words around once it ends up in a police report. And, get an attorney ASAP, because sexual assault is extremely serious, and you do not want to do ANYTHING without your attorney present.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Offices of Elliott Zarabi
    Law Offices of Elliott Zarabi | Elliott Zarabi
    Stay silent and hire an attorney to go in with you. You should not give a statement without an attorney present! The authorities will make you feel as if you are screwing yourself by saying "I want an attorney present" They may say "well you are guilty because you want an attorney" DO NOT FALL INTO THAT TRAP! Hire an attorney!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    Listen to the second lawyer and keep your mouth shut. They don't want your "side" of the story.. they want a statement from you that they can use in a prosecution of you for some type of sexual assault. You listen to the first attorney and you could be talking your way into prison and lifetime sex offender registration. Keep your mouth shut. Don't say a word about this to anyone. No twitter, no Facebook, emails, texts nothing. The ONLY person you talk to about this is your lawyer (and I certainly hope it's not the first guy) in a confidential setting.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    The first lawyer is incompetent. DO NOT TALK TO THE POLICE except under the careful and specific guidance of a skilled criminal defense lawyer, and that lawyer will usually advise you not to talk to them at all. Don't talk to anyone about the facts except your own lawyer. The police are good at talking you into making a statement. Don't let them. Rape is very, very serious, and you could be looking at years in jail, and you're more likely to be convicted if you talk to the police.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 8/9/2011
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law
    Edward A. Kroll, Attorney at Law | Edward A. Kroll
    DON'T talk to the police without a lawyer. Absolutely do not talk to the police. Get a lawyer. Now. These are serious charges, possibly prison-level felonies, and you want to get out in front of them ASAP.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 8/9/2011
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