What do I do if an investigator from the Department of Justice wants to talk to me? 40 Answers as of August 27, 2012

I have been contacted by my two friends that said an investigator from the Department of Justice is looking for me and wants to talk to me. I used to work for a company that helped people get their money back from fraudulent companies. When I was still working there, the Federal Trade Commission said that we were violating the telemarketing sales rule by contacting people that had already been involved in a telephone solicitation. I neither live in that state nor worked for that company in over a year. What should I do?

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William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
Seek a confidential consultation with an experienced criminal defense attorney. Do not speak to anyone else, and do not post anything else, because doing so might be used against you.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 8/27/2012
Law Office of Christopher G Humphrey PC | Christopher G Humphrey
Don't talk to them, get a lawyer. If the lawyer advises you to talk, make the lawyer go with you.
Answer Applies to: Wyoming
Replied: 8/27/2012
Law Office of Mark Bruce
Law Office of Mark Bruce | Mark Corwin Bruce
Hire a lawyer to contact DOJ for you, to determine if you are a witness or a suspect.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/23/2012
Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
The fact that it has been a year, does not mean you could not still be charged with a crime. The investigation may have taken that long. I would advise you to retain the services of an attorney, who could review with you the facts of your case, and if necessary decide if it is in your best interests to speak with the investigators, or counsel you as to how to answer their questions.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/23/2012
Myles Hahn III Attorney at Law | Myles Hahn III
You have a right under the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution to remain silent and not say anything. Keep your ears and eyes open.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 8/23/2012
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Do not talk with them without an attorney present.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
    Contact a lawyer to represent you immediately.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Natty Shafer Law
    Natty Shafer Law | Nathaniel Shafer
    If you are worried about possible criminal charges against you personally, hire an attorney. If you think the Department of Justice is just doing investigation of the company, it may be okay to cooperate with them.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD | Mace Yampolsky
    Do not talk to them without a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Herschel Bullen
    Herschel Bullen | Herschel Bullen
    It may not be serious. And you may not be the focus or target of their investigation. They may just be looking for information. But you should always bear in mind that you have an absolute right to remain silent under the Fifth Amendment. There is no such charge as refusing to talk to a Government agent. If you get any feeling at all that you are personally being investigated and charges may be brought against you, calmly and politely inform them that you will meet with them only if your lawyer is present.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    Never talk with the cops if they are looking into possible charges against you.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of James Gandy
    Law Office of James Gandy | James Gandy
    It would probably be best to hire an attorney. They would be in a much better position to assist you. In any event, if a person is being investigated by law enforcement, it is rarely in that person's interest to talk to the law enforcement officials. If they are interested in using you as a possible witness, you need an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    You need to talk with an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    You should probably discuss this case with a criminal defense attorney familiar with federal practice in the state where the case would proceed. You need to know that it is a crime to lie to investigators, but not a crime to refuse to talk. It's better not to talk than to lie if your are not a target of the investigation, but simply a witness, this may be nothing, but if you could get charged, you need representation. You probably do not know whether you are a target. You do not have to talk with anyone, but failure to do so eliminates a potential mitigator if you are eventually convicted.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Dennis P. Mikko Attorney at Law | Dennis P. Mikko
    You should retain an attorney before talking to anyone.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    If they want to interrogate you, make sure you know your rights to remain silent and have an attorney with you during the questioning. Consult an attorney if they want you to submit to questioning.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Attorney at Law | John P. Rivers
    In most cases, the best approach would be to wait until they contact you. If Federal agents want to question you, it most likely would be best to do that with your lawyer present.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of Brian K. Wanerman
    Law Office of Brian K. Wanerman | Brian K. Wanerman
    Consult an attorney right away. Do not talk to any investigator or law enforcement official without your attorney present. Tell anyone who questions you about this that you refuse to answer questions without your attorney present.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    James M. Osak, P.C.
    James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
    Always have your attorney present when you talk to the cops, etc.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Fabian & Associates, Inc.
    Fabian & Associates, Inc. | Stephen G. Fabian, Jr.
    Contact a Lawyer before you talk to anyone.
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C.
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C. | Steven Fairlie
    You have to consult a good criminal defense lawyer ASAP.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Talk to an Attorney. DO NOT talk to people from DOJ.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    You have the right to remain silent and the right to an attorney. Assert them both. You are likely to be questioned by a Federal agent. They are highly skilled interrogators. Do not delay. Hire an experienced criminal defense attorney who had Federal experience today.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    I would speak to an attorney BEFORE I spoke with the Justice Department, depending on your positions and responsibility, you could be a target of the investigation.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    You should cooperate but use an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    You say thanks but no thanks. Ever heard of the right to remain silent? Exercise it!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    Get an attorney to interface with the authorities on your behalf.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    MatthewR. Schutz, Esq | Matthew R. Schutz
    First retain counsel. You may have violated a regulation or statute and know it, given the prevasiveness of law making these days. After having retained and discussed the situation, let the attorney handle it.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    I would make sure that you have experienced legal counsel with you before you meet. You will wish to know the parameters of the inquiry before siting down and limit your exposure to possible criminal charges.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Douglas M. Philpott, P.C. | Peter J. Philpott
    Retain counsel and have them address the investigators.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Conway Law Pllc.
    Conway Law Pllc. | B. L. Conway
    BE VERY VERY QUIET. Tell him to talk w/ your Lawyer. Don't give a statement to anybody!
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    You don't have to do anything. If you even remotely suspect that you are a target of an investigation then you should hire a lawyer and the lawyer, after interviewing you, might decide to contact the investigator.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Larry K. Dunn & Associates | Larry K. Dunn
    Anytime a person is the target of a criminal investigation, the person should immediately consult with an attorney in order to preserve their constitutional rights and avoid self-incrimination.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Before I made any state to DOJ or any law enforcement I would consult a good criminal defense attorney, run the facts by them and have them go with you to the meeting.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/23/2012
    Mary W Craig P.C. | Mary W Craig
    The last thing you want to do is run from DOJ. They take a very dim view of that. If DOJ wants to talk to you, make an appointment to talk with them and be as honest as you can. Perhaps they only need your help to investigate someone else. If during the interview you begin to think that you are a target, tell the investigator you don't feel comfortable going any further without a lawyer and don't answer any more questions. If the investigator starts off giving you your Miranda rights, tell him you will not answer any questions without a lawyer present. You have that constitutional right and you should use it.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/23/2012
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