What deed form does an administrator use to put this wife name on his house? 23 Answers as of September 17, 2012

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Victor Varga | Victor Varga
Not sure what you are asking here...deed form?
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 9/17/2012
LAW OFFICE OF JASMINE OHANIAN | JASMINE OHANIAN
This will depend on your situation.The most common ones are community property, joint tenancy with right of survivorship or tenancy in common. The form you use will depend on your needs and your particular situation. Also, tax considerations should be taken into consideration.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/17/2012
Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
After court approval, generally a quit claim.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/17/2012
Edward L. Armstrong, P.C. | Edward L. Armstrong
He can use any deed form to do this but typically would use a Quitclaim Deed.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 9/17/2012
Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski
Law Offices of Gerald A. Bagazinski | Gerald A. Bagazinski
If you are the personal representative, I would do a Personal Representative's deed. If you want to add your spouse a quit claim deed would suffice. Contact an attorney for assistance.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/17/2012
    Blough Law Office | Janis L. Blough
    Based only on the information given, a Quit Claim deed to husband and wife signed by the husband alone and recorded with the register of deeds should do the trick, but you might want to consult an experienced just in case there is more involved; many offer free phone consultations. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Frederick & Frederick PLC | James P Frederick
    I am a little thrown by your use of the term "administrator." Leaving that out, for the moment, a person would add his wife to his property by using a deed. A Quit Claim Deed is probably the deed I would use, and the TYPE of Quit Claim Deed would depend on the ultimate objective. For example, you can set up a deed in such a way that you would reserve a life estate for the wife and then the remainder would pass to the beneficiaries of your choice. Now, getting back to "administrator," who has an administrator and why? What does the administrator have to do with the property? Without knowing more about that person and his/her role, I cannot speak to that aspect of your question.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
    Your question is not real clear. For purposes of responding I will assume that you are asking how the transfer is made to the decedent's wife, not the administrator's wife. If you are inquiring how a court appointed estate administrator transfers real property to a beneficiary/heir (possibly the widow), the court appointed administrator would use an administrator's deed after the administrator has authority to make the transfer. The administrator, if unsure, should speak to counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    David T. McAndrew, Attorney at Law | David T. McAndrew
    If his wife is the beneficiary of the property, then the Personal Representative could transfer the property with an Executor's Deed, accompanied by a Certified copy of the Death Certificate and a Copy of his Letters of Authority.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C.
    Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C. | Brian Haggerty
    The administrator of a decedent's estate would use a "personal representative's deed," which is basically a bargain and sale deed.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    If you are the beneficiary of the property, then a grant deed will suffice.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Richard E. Damon, PC | Richard E. Damon
    Huh? Your question does not compute.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    O'Keefe Legal Services, L.L.C.
    O'Keefe Legal Services, L.L.C. | Sean P. O'Keefe
    Please clarify your question. Is the house passing from the decedent to the decedent's surviving spouse? Did the spouses own the property as joint titleholders? If yes, then in Maryland the personal representative may not need to create a new deed because the property may pass to the joint title holder by operation of law.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Horn & Johnsen SC
    Horn & Johnsen SC | Dera L. Johnsen-Tracy
    If there is an estate, then in Wisconsin the property should be transferred through a Personal Representative's Deed. This deed should be drafted by the attorney who represents the estate.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    Personal Representative Deed.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    There is no form, the personal representive signs as the personal represetave of the estate of _______.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Martinson & Beason, PC
    Martinson & Beason, PC | Douglas C Martinson II
    You should have an attorney prepare the deed. The cost an attorney will charge is very reasonable and you don't need to cause a lot of problems dealing with land (a major asset) to save $150.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    THE BROOME LAW FIRM, LLC
    THE BROOME LAW FIRM, LLC | Barry D. Broome
    The same real estate deed form is used as in a single ownership deed. If the spouise is to be added you must decide which joint ownership to use. Joint Tenancy with Rights of Survivorship means the property will automatically go to the survivor.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    I'm sorry but I am not sure what you are asking. By "his house", are you referring to a decedent or the administrator?
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Whiteford, Taylor, & Preston | Edwin Fee
    There are no statutory deed forms in Maryland. You should contact an attorney to prepare a deed.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    Neal M. Rimer, Esquire
    Neal M. Rimer, Esquire | Neal M. Rimer
    An administrator is usually a fiduciary appointed by the court to administer a decedent's estate. The administrator needs a court order to transfer property. Without a court order, no transfer of real estate should take place. With a court order, the administrator can execute a deed transferring property to a person... Only the person who owns the property can transfer property to their spouse. There are various ways in California to take title between husband and wife. Joint tenancy, community property, community property with the right of survivorship, and tenants in common. A husband and wife who create a trust can also take title as trustees. There are different forms of deeds to use as well. A Grant Deed or a Quitclaim Deed are the most common. Which one to use depends on circumstances. So, an administrator would not transfer property to their spouse. You need to retain an attorney and discuss your particular facts to get the proper advice.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/17/2012
    McCleary & Associates, PC
    McCleary & Associates, PC | David M. McCleary
    This question makes no sense.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/17/2012
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