What could my punishment be for a hit and run? 39 Answers as of July 12, 2013

Last night I hit and ran a parked car. The person knows I did it and the police are reportedly already involved. I am planning on turning myself in tomorrow. This is my first offense, and I am 19. What will the punishment most likely be?

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Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
This response is general information only and does not establish an attorney client relationship.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 7/12/2013
Lowenstein Law Office
Lowenstein Law Office | Anthony Lowenstein
Hit and run punishments vary widely based on the damage to property or injury to persons. For more information, please see my website or call me for a legal consultation.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/14/2011
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
The max fine could be $2500 and up to 12 months jail, but I seriously doubt the judge would impose anywhere close to those, especially if you take responsibility for the act and turn yourself in. I would advise you to consult with an attorney first.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 6/14/2011
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
You really should get a lawyer and if you haven't turned yourself in yet I would consult one. You could work out a civil compromise without a conviction. The more evidence the police have against you like the statement you will likely be asked to make when you turn yourself in the less likely you will avoid a conviction. The punishment will likely only be a fine and payment of restitution but you will have a misdemeanor conviction on your record.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/13/2011
Law Offices of John Carney
Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
You should retain an attorney and let him talk to the police for you..You will probably be placed on probation if you have a clean record. Your insurance may increase and you will have to pay for the damages to the person's car.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/13/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Leaving the scene of an accident without injuries, depending on the court that you are required to appear, can be incarceration for a period of up to six months and a fine of up to $500 plus payment of restitution. Additionally, your driving privilege can be suspended for this offense.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
    Where I practice people convicted of misdemeanor hit and run usually end up with a short period of probation (a year and a half to two years), restitution (paying back the damage), a 90 day license suspension and possibly some community service. You maybe able to compromise with the owner of the damaged car and settle it out of court, however. You should find a lawyer and if the police call, don't talk to them!
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    LynchLaw
    LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
    If the only damage was to the parked car you could be charged with a violation of Vehicle Code section 20002. Such a charge comes with a maximum sentence of 6 months in jail, and/or a fine of $1,000. While you say the police have been informed, this does not mean they have been told who is suspected. It would be prudent for any vehicle owner to file a police report before submitting a claim to their insurance company. Think twice about turning yourself in. While you have done wrong, don't compound that act by helping to prosecute yourself. Perhaps the owner can be contacted and arrangements can be made to cover his loss without having to file an insurance claim. Hopefully paying for the repairs will be punishment enough to help you take actions that will help prevent this from happening again.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Eric M. Mark, Attorney at Law
    Eric M. Mark, Attorney at Law | Eric Mark
    This varies state to state, but could involve large fines and license suspensions. Turning yourself in is a smart move, but you should not do so without a lawyer to protect your rights. You should not make any statements to the police. I highly recommend consulting with a criminal defense attorney in your area.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    In Washington, for someone with no criminal history, felony hit and run carries a sentence of 3 - 9 months in jail.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    I would urge you to contact a criminal attorney in your community as soon as possible. While no one can predict what your sentence could be, it is important that you retain counsel to help you with all your rights and options. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Anderson & Carnahan
    Anderson & Carnahan | Stephen Anderson
    You could be facing jail and loss of license up to one year. I would be glad to discuss your options.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    As long as there was no injury or death, the penalties for hit and run driving in Louisiana are fines of up to $500 and jail time of up to 6 months. However, it may be the case that even in a minor accident a victim may claim injury in which case the penalties increase to fines of up to $5,000 and jail time of up to 10 years. It is advisable to consult with an attorney if you believe that charges have been filed and law enforcement is involved before you are required to turn yourself in and/or a warrant is issued for your arrest. If you are seeking legal representation in this matter in Louisiana, we invite you to contact our firm at the information on this page for a free case evaluation.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    Normally a fine, but the charge does carry a loss of license and possibility of jail.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
    The court will advise you of your maximum possible penalties at your arraignment and you should receive information in writing about your charges. You are presumed innocent until proven guilty. The prosecutor needs to prove their case beyond a reasonable doubt. I would recommend consulting with an experienced criminal defense attorney who routinely represents clients in your particular state and your local area regarding your case. If you cannot afford to retain the council of your choice, the court may appoint someone to represent you at the public's expense.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    Instead of just pleading guilty,why not hire a lawyer orat least consult with one immediately. Many times these things can be worked out without police intervention and hence, without punishment. You could have been going home to call the police about the accident and then got scared or a number of other things could have happened to intercede in reporting the incident to the police. Speak to the lawyer right away. It may save an arrest. The punishment is not that bad, so relax a bit too. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Law Office of Michael Moody
    Law Office of Michael Moody | Michael Moody
    Hit & Run is a misdemeanor, meaning you couldn't possibly get more jail time than 12 months; but it is unlikely that you would get any jail time. You will probably get probation, but if you plead guilty, you license will be suspended. You definitely need a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/13/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    With an otherwise clean record, a term of probation with fines and costs seems most likely. I would also expect some form of community service or a short jail sentence. It will add points to your driving record and may result in action by the secretary of state against your license.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    The English Law Firm
    The English Law Firm | Robert English
    If you proceed with sufficient speed to the police to report the incident, they may decide not to press charges. Time is of the essence. If you are charged, you would have a good chance for a probationary sentence even if you decided not to contest the matter. You should, however, talk to an attorney before entering any plea agreement.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    It is likely to be charged as a misdemeanor which is punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $1000 fine. If you have no prior record, it is possible that you may be able to avoid a conviction with the assistance of legal counsel. Call for a consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    Get a lawyer. Suspended license; conviction of a crime; potential jail time; fines, court fees, etc.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    In Michigan, you could be charged with a variety of offenses, including leaving the scene of a property damage accident or failing to report an accident. The results will depend on your record and the prosecutor and your judge. You are best advised to hire an attorney before turning yourself in so that you avoid making incriminating statements which could result in more charges and a weakened defense. If at all possible, avoiding a criminal conviction would be the desired result. Perhaps you could get consideration for a plea to a civil infraction which is not criminal. This will depend on your Court and the Prosecutor. I hope that this was helpful.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    It will help your case greatly if you turn yourself in and do the right thing. If the damage to the car is paid for then there is a good chance that a good attorney can get you just a fine, even an infraction. Feel free to contact me if you'd like to discuss it further. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    LSA without injury is a misdemeanor. You may be able to work something out without being charged at all, or alternatively avoid conviction. It would be best to have a lawyer negotiate something on your behalf. If the victim has insurance, perhaps you could pay the deductible, and be done with it. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas | Thomas Ogas
    This depends on what county your case is in. Punishment vary a lot between different jurisdictions. But if you turn yourself in and your attorney can work with the victim to pay for the damages, you'll very likely be able to work out a civil compromise and get your case dismissed, resulting in no jail time. Talk to an attorney, though, to help smooth the process along and make sure you don't do any jail time when you turn yourself in.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Do not turn yourself in! Hire a lawyer first and speak to no one but them!
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
    Hello- The maximum sentence is one year in jail, and considerable fines, as well as "restitution" to the owner of the damaged vehicle. This offense also carries 12 points against your driving privilege. 12 points in a year means revocation of your drivers license. If you have a decent driving record, no prior offenses, and the circumstances are not aggravated, they will likely plea bargain the case down to a lesser offense such as careless driving (4 points), or reckless driving (8 points). Careless driving carries no jail, and jail for reckless is rarely imposed. If their case is a "slam dunk," it is best to be sure you take care of the damaged vehicle (through insurance or otherwise) before getting to court. However, In most all circumstances, you must be very careful about whether to talk about the case with anyone except a lawyer and especially the police. Hope this was helpful if not, get back with me.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    Assuming this occurred in Colorado, it depends on what county you're in and how lenient the city/district attorney's office is. Penalties can range from probation to up to 90 days in jail, a fine, etc. Call an attorney in your county who has experience with what typically occurs in your jurisdiction.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC | Raymond J. Savoy
    Penalties vary from state to state. In Connecticut, you can have your license suspended and face jail time. The courts use several factors to determine the penalty, including your prior record and the seriousness of the offense.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Could be misdemeanor or felony charges. You'll learn the actual charge[s] filed against you when you appear for arraignment at your first court hearing. When charged with a felony, you potentially face one or more years in prison if convicted; on a misdemeanor, you potentially face up to 6-12 months in jail. Multiple counts and charges multiply your problems. If you have priors and strikes, they are penalty enhancements under the 3 Strikes rules. If this constitutes a probation or parole violation, factor those new and old charge[s] in as well. No attorney can predict the outcome, nor even give an intelligent opinion, without reviewing and knowing all the charges, evidence, reports, testimony, priors history, etc. However, with you voluntarily turning yourself in. WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF COUNSEL, and exercising your 5th Amendment right to SHUT UP and do NOT talk to anyone except your attorney about the case, then effective plea-bargaining, using whatever legal defenses, facts and sympathies there may be, could possibly keep you out of jail, or at least dramatically reduce it, depending upon all the facts. Not exactly a do it yourself project in court for someone who does not know how to effectively represent himself against a professional prosecutor intending to convict. If you don't know how to do these things effectively, then hire an attorney that does, who will try to get a dismissal, diversion program, reduction or other decent outcome through plea bargain, or take it to trial. If serious about hiring counsel to help you in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. I'll be happy to help use whatever defenses there may be.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Instead of focusing on the punishment, you need to hire an attorney before you begin incriminating yourself, making a case go from bad to worse.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    A restitution order and, a fine and maybe some jail. Per what you say about your record, may get com. service. An attorney could be helpful here. Do not leave creative sentencing to the DA and judge. Won't happen.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    The punishment for hit and run, known as failure to stop and give information in Texas, varies by state. In Texas, it is a misdemeanor offense.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    It carries potential jail time, but with no prior record, I wouldn't expect you would get jail. Probation, community service and a fine are all distinct possibilities. Of course, you will take a hit on your driving history and your insurance will likely go up, so don't be short-sighted about the consequences. You should find a criminal defense attorney that routinely practices in the court where your case will be heard to represent you. If you (or your folks) cannot afford an attorney, request the services of the public defender.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    If you just caused damage to a vehicle, then that is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 90 days in jail and/or $100 fine and driver's license suspension. Since you are between the ages of 17 and 21, you are eligible for what is called "HYTA status." HYTA stands for Holmes Youthful Trainee Act which will keep the charge off your permanent public record if you successfully complete the terms of probation. I would suggest retaining an experienced criminal attorney who will be able to give you a more precise answer about your particular situation.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    You should retain my office as counsel to surrender you so that the police cannot question you and you make incriminating statements. These are very serious charges which will cause a large insurance increase and have penal implications. Call us before you turn yourself in.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    Do not make any statements when you turn yourself in. Either go with a lawyer or immediately invoke your right to remain silent and demand an attorney. The police may say they are trying to help you buts that b-s. Don't make the prosecutor's job easier. If there was only property damage, a good lawyer can probably avoid you getting a criminal record.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/10/2011
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