What can I do if I cant afford to pay for my medical bills? 34 Answers as of June 23, 2013

I am currently getting my wages garnished for medical bills. My husband and myself both had cancer one year apart from each other. The same hospital is now filing another suit against me. I called to make payment arrangements with the their attorney and they wanted a minimum of $250.00 per month on the new law suit. I cannot pay anymore at this time. I am already having a garnishment of 25%. What can I do?

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Law Office of Asaph Abrams
Law Office of Asaph Abrams | Asaph Abrams
Bankruptcy filings "stay" or stop garnishments and eliminate medical bills.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/26/2011
Paul Stuber, Attorney at Law
Paul Stuber, Attorney at Law | Paul Stuber
The cannot garnish more than the 25%. You do not have to make additional payments. A Bankruptcy would stop the garnishment and stop the next law suit as well.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 9/24/2011
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC | Christopher J. Mercado
If you are considering Bankruptcy, medical bills are dischargeable. Contact a local attorney for a consultation.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 9/21/2011
Law Office Of Magnolia Zarraga
Law Office Of Magnolia Zarraga | Magnolia Zarraga
You need to consult with a bankruptcy attorney. Medical debt is one of the main reasons Americans file for bankruptcy relief. Medical debt is dischargeable in a bankruptcy. Getting rid of the debt will free up at least 25% of your income so you can start saving, pay food, pay rent, etc. Don't delay consult today with an attorney. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/20/2011
Law Office of Lynnmarie A. Johnson
Law Office of Lynnmarie A. Johnson | Lynnmarie Johnson
I would check with a bankruptcy attorney and see if you qualify to file bankruptcy. If can't wreck your credit anymore than being garnished and sued and you can get rid of all the bills at once and stop the garnishment! Good Luck!
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/20/2011
    Eranthe Law Firm
    Eranthe Law Firm | Cate Eranthe
    25% is the maximum amount of a garnishment. Go see a knowledgeable local bankruptcy attorney for some advice.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/20/2011
    CONSUMER PROTECTION ASSISTANCE COALITION, INC. (DE).
    CONSUMER PROTECTION ASSISTANCE COALITION, INC. (DE). | Gary Lee Lane
    It is time for you to file bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Eric J. Benzer, Attorney at Law
    Eric J. Benzer, Attorney at Law | Eric Benzer
    You have to file for bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Financial Relief Law Center
    Financial Relief Law Center | Mark Alonso
    You can consider filing for bankruptcy to stop the wage garnishment and the get this debt, as well as other unsecured debt you have, discharged. Many people have medical debt that they are unable to afford to keep paying. Once debts go unpaid, the creditors have the right to file a lawsuit against you. If you are at the point where there are multiple actions from more than one creditor, then you need to take serious steps towards the bankruptcy protections. While it is true that only one creditor can garnish you at a time, the fact that one is garnishing you and you are trying to make payment arrangements with another, is probably a sign that you are in over your head and raises the question of whether or not this garnishment and payment arrangement is something you can sustain going forward. Since it doesn't appear affordable to you, you should contact a bankruptcy attorney to evaluate your options.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Diefer Law Group, P.C.
    Diefer Law Group, P.C. | Abel Fernandez
    If you cannot afford to pay the bills, you can always consider bankruptcy as an option. The bankruptcy law is designed to help individuals who cannot pay their bills. Thus, if you cannot live on the income left after the garnishment you should consult a bankruptcy attorney to help you file for bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Bird & VanDyke, Inc.
    Bird & VanDyke, Inc. | David VanDyke
    A chapter 7 bankruptcy would wipe all your medical bills out, including the wage garnisment and other lawsuits.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Bankruptcy Law Center
    Bankruptcy Law Center | Bill Zurinskas
    Medical bankruptcy is the most common cause of bankruptcy. More than half of the bankuptcies filed are primarily due to medical bills.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    AyerHoffman, LLP
    AyerHoffman, LLP | Melissa Hoffman
    Filing for bankruptcy will immediately stop the wage garnishment and any pending judicial proceeding. If you file under Chapter 7, all of you medical debt will likely be discharged. If you file under Chapter 13, you will be put on a payment plan of three to five years, where you will pay some percentage of what is owed. The balance that remains at the end of the Plan period will be discharged.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Theodore N. Stapleton, PC
    Theodore N. Stapleton, PC | Theodore N. Stapleton
    You may qualify to file a chapter 7 bankruptcy and discharge the debts.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Law Office of John C. Farrell, Jr.
    Law Office of John C. Farrell, Jr. | John C. Farrell, Jr.
    Unfortanely creditors do not have a "heart" and will stop at nothing to get their money despite the fact that both you and your husband had cancer. There are exemptions under the granishment laws which limit the amount taken. One exemption would be the head of household exemption. Additioanlly, it sounds like you need a strong advocate on your side to get these people to work with you. I would plead your hardship to the judge if all else fails.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Ross Smith, Attorney at Law
    Ross Smith, Attorney at Law | Charles Ross Smith III
    You may have to file a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 6/23/2013
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis
    Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis | Eric Lewis
    Bankruptcy is a viable option to stopping garnishments and discharging liability on medical bills.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Law Offices of James Wingfield
    Law Offices of James Wingfield | James Wingfield
    I suggest that you consult a qualified bankruptcy attorney. Depending on the totality of your circumstances you may want to consider filing a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Medical bills are treated the same as credit card debt in a bankruptcy and you may be able to discharge the debts in full. Before filing a bankruptcy it is always important that you understand how a bankruptcy will effect you, your assets and your income.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Heupel Law
    Heupel Law | Kevin Heupel
    If the creditor will not settle with you, then you should consider bankruptcy. Bankruptcy is a federal law where you get to assert your rights against the creditor rather than the creditor dictating the terms to you.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall
    Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall | William M. Rubendall
    If you are overwhelmed by medical bills consult an attorney about chapter 7 bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Grace Law Offices of John F Geraghty Jr.
    Grace Law Offices of John F Geraghty Jr. | John F. Geraghty, Jr.
    There is a limit to what percentage of your earnings can be garnished and 25% is about the limit.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/19/2011
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis | Todd Mannis
    Bankruptcy. You don't have enough to settle this thing, and even if you could, would it be worth it? Probably better to file BK.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/23/2013
    The Morris Law Group
    The Morris Law Group | Geoff Morris
    I would recommend that you call a bankruptcy attorney. Our bankruptcy laws were enacted to help people just like you that find themselves in a financial bind as a result of a serious illness. I think you will find it to be a huge relief if you talk to someone.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    See a lawyer ASAP to consider stopping the garnishment and erase the debt via bankruptcy if you qualify.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Law Offices of Daniel Moulton
    Law Offices of Daniel Moulton | Daniel Moulton
    If you qualify, you can file a Chapter 7 to eliminate them.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Charles Schneider, P.C.
    Charles Schneider, P.C. | Charles J. Schneider
    See if you qualify for filing bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/23/2013
    Judith A. Runyon, Esq. Attorney at Law
    Judith A. Runyon, Esq. Attorney at Law | Judith A. Runyon
    Talk to a bankruptcy attorney to see if you qualify for a Chapter 7.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Colorado Legal Solutions
    Colorado Legal Solutions | Stephen Harkess
    Medical bills can be discharged in bankruptcy. You should probably talk to an experienced bankruptcy attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Ariano & Reppucci
    Ariano & Reppucci | Chris Ariano
    Filing for bankruptcy is one option. As you are probably aware, filing for bankruptcy has both advantages and disadvantages. One of the greatest advantages involves the ability to eliminate such debts as medical bills. For more information, I suggest meeting with an experienced local bankruptcy attorney. Most offer free consultations, so this is a great way to get additional information at little risk to you. Contact me for more information or to schedule a consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Law Office of Harry L Styron
    Law Office of Harry L Styron | Harry L Styron
    You could both file a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, assuming from your comments that both of you are working, which requires a repayment plan which only has to pay the creditors as much as they would get if you filed a Chapter 7 liquidation and no more than you can afford with your present expenses. If your joint income is small enough, you might be able to file a Chapter 7 liquidation, and simply get rid of the whole thing. You should consult with a bankruptcy attorney so that you can be advised of exactly what your situation permits. You could also continue to negotiate with the attorney, who probably is more flexible than he or she appeared to be at the time.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Uriarte & Wood, Attorneys at Law
    Uriarte & Wood, Attorneys at Law | Robert G. Uriarte
    Talk to a bankruptcy lawyer to see if this can alleviate your situation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Weig Law Firm, LLC
    Weig Law Firm, LLC | Paul H. Weig
    If one creditor is already taking 25%, and you have no non-exempt assets other than your wages, the next creditor can't make it any worse. 75% of your take-home pay is exempt from the claims of creditors. It may be worth consulting with a consumer law attorney to see if the collectors have done everything on the up and up. Bankruptcy would discharge the bills.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    D T Pham Associates, PLLC
    D T Pham Associates, PLLC | Duncan T Pham
    Consider filing for bankruptcy relief.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 6/23/2013
    The Schinner Law Group
    The Schinner Law Group | Quinn J. Chevalier
    File for bankruptcy (either chapter 7 or 13). Medical debt is usually dischargeable. If these debts are crippling your ability to live a decent life, then bankruptcy is probably the best way to go.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2011
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