What can I do if the doctor mistreated me? 24 Answers as of December 30, 2010

I went to the eye doctor yesterday for a field test. While there he did a glaucoma test. when he did the field test there were two bottles of drops sitting there. I performed the field test and was fine. Then he put in the drops for the glaucoma test. They were think and gummy in my eyes supposed to be numbing drops but I think he put something else in, because they didn't feel the same as the drops from the last test he did on me a few weeks before. Not only that but my vision has not returned to normal from the test at 2:30 yesterday. My eyes still hurt, my vision is not back to normal and I have a corneal abrasion from the glaucoma test. I can barely ready my computer to type this and I certainly can't drive, all of these things I could do prior to my 2:30 appointment yesterday.

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Dack Marasigan, LLP
Dack Marasigan, LLP | Martin E. Dack, Esq
If the problem persist, You can claim for malpractice but you must prove it.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/30/2010
The Connelly Firm P.C.
The Connelly Firm P.C. | Thomas Connelly
Sounds like something indeed went wrong. Give it another day or two and give me a call if you are still symptomatic. I need additional information: (1) did your doctor say anything that indicated to you that there was a mistake? (2) how do you know that you scratched your cornea? I have a client who received ear wax remover in his eyes. Your situation does not sound quite as bad, but nonetheless very suspicious.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 12/18/2010
Law Office of Curry & Westgate
Law Office of Curry & Westgate | Patrick Curry
You need to see a doctor to determine the cause of your injuries.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/17/2010
Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
You can claim for malpractice but you must prove it. You must find another doctor with the same or higher training and see what he thinks about your case. You might also ask the doctor what the problem is.
Answer Applies to: North Carolina
Replied: 12/16/2010
Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC
Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC | Lacy Fields
If your injuries persist, you may have a medical malpractice claim. Get whatever treatment you need for your eyes, and hope that everything gets better (nothing is worth losing part or all of your sight). If things do not get better, contact an attorney. Be prepared to track how much you have been billed for medical care, and how much work you have missed.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 12/15/2010
    William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law
    William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law | William C. Gosnell
    You need to see an Ophthalmologist as soon as possible. Not the same one you saw yesterday and find out what happened.
    Answer Applies to: Tennessee
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    The Farber Law Group
    The Farber Law Group | Herbert G. Farber
    You should see an ophthalmologist today. Your number one priority should be to have your eye problem assessed by a qualified professional and treatment started, if required. If, in the opinion of a physician, your eye problem stems from medical malpractice, then you should see the counsel of an experienced medical malpractice attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    Law Office of Matt Potempa, PLLC
    Law Office of Matt Potempa, PLLC | Matt Potempa
    The question for a potential medical malpractice claim is whether the doctor breach the standard of care. In other words, did the doctor do something most other doctors would not. Having side effects the day after your visit may be normal. If your vision does not return to normal within a few days/weeks and you think it was because of negligence, contact a medical malpractice attorney in your area. Many firms specializing in this area of practice have nurse consultants on staff to evaluate whether the standard of care was breached.
    Answer Applies to: Tennessee
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    Barry Rabovsky & Associates
    Barry Rabovsky & Associates | Barry Rabovsky
    If you feel something is wrong, please get a second medical opinion as soon as possible and contact us with the information obtained from the second doctor.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    Law Office of Travis Prestwich, PC
    Law Office of Travis Prestwich, PC | Travis Prestwich
    It probably is a good idea to either go back to your eye doctor, or see another doctor to have things checked out. Any claim that may result would depend on whether there was an injury. If so, was the doctor negligent in causing the injury, etc. Seeing someone about your condition is the first and most important step.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    You may have a cause of action but it is hard to say based on your fact pattern. Please make your doctor aware of the situation as soon as you can, so that he can help you if the wrong medicine was dispensed. You must take steps to mitigate the injury. You also need to find out exactly what was dispensed to determine whether in fact an error occurred. If the correct medicine was dispensed, it may have been a bad batch and your doctor should be made aware of that to prevent this from happening to somebody else. You will need to document all the losses you incurred as a result of the dispensing of the improper medication including the pain & suffering. If you have any further questions please contact me. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    Wilson & Hajek,LLC, a personal injury law firm
    Wilson & Hajek,LLC, a personal injury law firm | Francis Hajek
    I think you need to go to a doctor and get your eyes checked. A lawyer will not be able to assist you until you find out what is the matter. As a practical matter, most medical malpractice cases involve significant and permanent injuries because the cost of such cases does not permit the handling of smaller cases. Hope this helps.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    LT Pepper Law
    LT Pepper Law | Luke T. Pepper
    Further investigation is needed but for sake of argument. The Doctor may have been negligent in the manner he treated you. Best to call the office for a consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A.
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A. | James P Kelaher
    I would promptly see another ophthalmologist, not just an optometrist, to try to get your vision fixed. If it doesn't heal properly and promptly, then I would see an attorney who handles a significant number of medical malpractice cases. He or she may not feel your damages are sufficient to sink tens of thousands of dollars into the costs which will necessarily be incurred, but see a lawyer; first, try to get your eyes healed by a different, and good, ophthalmologist.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    Van Sant & Slover LLC
    Van Sant & Slover LLC | David Van Sant
    Your eye doctor may very well be responsible if the drops were not eye drops. If the drops were the right stops and you simply had an isolated reaction then you might not have a claim. You have to ask yourself what did the doc do wrong. You should consult an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/15/2010
    Lyle B. Masnikoff and Associates
    Lyle B. Masnikoff and Associates | Lyle B. Masnikoff
    You may have a medical malpractice case against the doctor. However, these cases are very difficult and many attorneys will not take the case unless there are huge damages. It may be too early to tell what your damages are but I would recommend speaking to a medical malpractice attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 12/14/2010
    Cary J. Wintroub & Associates
    Cary J. Wintroub & Associates | Cary J. Wintroub
    Go to a new doctor for a second opinion.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/14/2010
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O.
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O. | Eric R. Chandler
    First, follow up with a doctor as soon as possible to make sure there is not serious damage to your eye. The sticky gummy eye drops you are describing are pretty standard for eye exams. Typically, when you are seen for glaucoma, the doctor is doing a pressure test on your eyes and then dilating your eyes so that they can better see your optic nerves. The effect of this should be gone within 4-5 hours, however some people react differently. Again, the first thing I would do is call the doctor and let them know what id going on.

    Medical malpractice claims are very tough and very expensive. If you are okay, and there is no serious injury to your eye, it will likely not be worth pursuing a claim. If there was serious damage done to your eye, then set up a consultation with a medical malpractice attorney in your area as soon as you are able to.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 12/14/2010
    Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo
    Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo | Mark Leonardo
    The first thing to do is get immediate treatment from someone else and see if they are able to ascertain what happened. You could go back to the original doctor, but he may be less than honest and try to cover up his mistake. Most doctors do not want to get involved in litigation, but see if you can get the new doctor to commit to what the cause was for the injury and encourage him to document the record to that effect. If the injury is minor and your sight returns in few days, then you should have the other doctor pay for your care. If your eyes are damaged permanently or for a significant period of time, contact a medical malpractice lawyer to pursue a claim.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/10/2010
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