What can I do if an auto dealer has not paid off my trade in? 3 Answers as of June 19, 2014

It has been over 3 months. I am reading some online complaints from other people about the same problem with the same dealership. I have filed complaints with the secretary of state and with the attorney general, but it takes weeks for them to begin looking into the problem. Is it worth getting an attorney to sue the dealership?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
SmithMarco, P.C.
SmithMarco, P.C. | Larry P. Smith
Depends on the dealership. I have sued dealers for this before, and successfully. The issue is whether the dealer is solvent. The reason some of them do this kind of thing is because they are broke. The other reason they would do this is that they are spot delivering you the vehicle and are holding out until they have financed you.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 6/19/2014
Law Offices of Henry Repay
Law Offices of Henry Repay | Henry Repay
You have covered the options quite well in your question. Usually, the cost effective route is to work through the agencies you mentioned, although it is hard to say what kind of results you will get and when. Yes, you can hire an attorney to sue, but the question is how far it will have to go. The costs will mount quickly. So, if you are not prepared for that, then you need to take your chances with the route you are going. Even if there is any chance of recouping attorney's fees, it is not likely that very many attorneys will consider a contingent fee. There are firms to which we refer consumer matters. A firm with that concentration may be more inclined to get involved. A BBB complaint may be helpful if the business responds. To protect others, post your own complaint on the BBB website and any other sites from which the dealer may be getting customers, but keep your complaint simple and to the point of what happened. Finally, if the dealer is a franchise of a larger company, you may try to move up the ladder with a complaint.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 6/19/2014
Edelman, Combs, Latturner & Goodwin, LLC | Daniel A. Edelman
You probably should consult an attorney immediately. If you are financing your car, notify the NEW finance company immediately. They are liable for the dealer's nonperformance. Consider continuing to pay the old contract and deducting the payments from the new, informing the new finance company that is what you are doing.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 6/19/2014
Click to View More Answers: