What can I do after Fare evasion tickets resulted in a warrant? 7 Answers as of March 21, 2011

I have about 8 outstanding fare evasion tickets that have turned into warrants. When I go to court will I be arrested? I want to settle them without going to jail

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The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
Go to the court house to set a court date for your appearance. I doubt seriously that you will be arrested at the clerk's window or in court if all you want to do is admit the violation and establish a payment plan. Court wants your money more than your body in custody.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/21/2011
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
I am not sure to what section of the penal code you are referring with regard to "fare evasion" tickets. If they are misdemeanors, there are many of them and you have failed to appear in the past, there is always a possibility the court could impose jail time if you plead guilty or set bail if you plead not guilty when you appear in court. An attorney might be of some assistance in that he might be able to appear for you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/21/2011
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
It depends on the court and your attorney. As it is now if you are stopped by the police you will go to jail until they can take you to court. Also you have a misdemeanor along with the infractions.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/17/2011
Law Office of Joseph A. Katz
Law Office of Joseph A. Katz | Joseph A. Katz
Though it is possible for you to go to jail to serve off the fines for the outstanding bail, it is very unlikely with such pedestrian (a joke; get it?) charges such as these. If you go to Court and agree to a payment schedule (i.e., request one), the Court will almostcertainly release you. After all, you did put the matter on calendar yourself to come in and face the music, right? The Court might even reduce the total outstanding fine. I hate the pay-to-play private highways on public land, myself, and the entire concept, but I suggest that you stop evading the toll.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/18/2011
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
If you do not hire a lawyer to help you, there is a chance you will be remanded into custody on these warrants. If you hire a lawyer, the lawyer can go to court for you to clear the warrants (you would not go and hence no risk of getting locked up) and to settle the citations, so you will have only a single fine to pay. A lawyer should charge you no more than $500 to do this, assuming all warrants are out of a single court.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/17/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts
    Law Office of Andrew Roberts | Andrew Stephen Roberts
    You need to go to court have all of the matters put on calendar and deal with them. Having an attorney might save u significant fees.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/17/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Defend the criminal charges.

    There is an arrest warrant out for you because of your failure to comply with the court orders? For a defendant to handle this, they must turn themselves into the court, with or without an attorney, and try to negotiate a plea bargain on the warrant and outstanding charges. Doing so voluntarily will result in a better outcome than being brought in cuffs to court after arrest on the warrant. That will happen if the defendant comes into contact with law enforcement or customs anywhere in the US. If this is a felony, the defendant must be personally present at every court hearing and appearance. If this is a misdemeanor, the attorney can appear in court without the defendant being present, and any plea bargain deal could be handled by notarized paperwork. Any fines could be paid by mail. Jail time, if any, would create an obvious problem requiring the defendants presence.

    When charged with a misdemeanor, you potentially face up to 6-12 months in jail and fines, etc. on each count. Effective plea-bargaining, using whatever legal defenses, facts and sympathies there may be, could possibly keep you out of jail, or at least dramatically reduce it, depending upon all the facts and evidence. Not exactly a do it yourself project in court for someone who does not know how to effectively represent himself against a professional prosecutor intending to convict. If you don't know how to do these things effectively, then hire an attorney that does, who will try to get a dismissal, diversion, reduction or other decent outcome through plea bargain for you, or take it to trial. If serious about doing so, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. Ill be happy to help you use whatever defenses you may have. If you can't afford private counsel, you can apply for the Public Defender.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/17/2011
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