What is the best undergraduate major for law school? 70 Answers as of October 19, 2015

I am very interested in law school (yes I know it's a lot of schooling). I'm a senior in high school and will be graduating early in December. I am not sure what I want to major in but know I want to be a lawyer. I was doing research online and got a bunch of different answers so I thought I would ask a real lawyer the best undergraduate degree for law school.

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Ronald K. Nims LLC | Ronald K. Nims
Engineering or science would prepare you for being a patent lawyer. Accounting prepares you to be a tax lawyer. Every degree has strengths and weaknesses. I would advise you to pursue a degree with a career path that interests you, if you don't go to law school.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 10/19/2015
Law Office of Pamela Braynon | Pamela Y. Braynon
Wow. You can major in just about anything you wish. Although I was a business administration major, many of my law school class mates majored in political science. I don't know how much that helped them. Law school is whole different animal and majoring in an undergrad major I don't believe will give you any type of advantage. Maybe you should think about the type of law you wish to focus on, and choose your undergrad major from that.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 10/19/2015
Anderson Law Office
Anderson Law Office | Scott L. Anderson
Usually it is political science and government but a business degree is never bad if you plan on being a solo practitioner.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 10/15/2015
McKenzie,Wilkes & Mahmoud | Henry Nasif Mahmoud
I wanted to be a lawyer since the 4th grade. I Majored in Economics.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 10/15/2015
Law Office of Martin A. Kahan | Martin A. Kahan
There really is no "best" undergrad major. If you are interested in going to law school, the best advice that I can give you is to achieve high grades in whatever you major in and start preparing early in undergrad school for the LSAT. Your undergrad record and LSAT will determine which law school accepts you. Law school is a different world from undergrad and the best preparation for the rigors of law school is a difficult major which requires discipline and hard work. Best of luck!
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/15/2015
    Edward L. Armstrong, P.C. | Edward L. Armstrong
    Most law schools do not dictate any preferred curriculum but rather stress the importance of a broad education. Courses that stimulate thinking and analysis are always helpful - history, philosophy, literature. Writing is an extremely important area - lawyers need to be able to communicate in a meaningful way. This sounds 'basic' but I am surprised at the number of lawyers who could use a course in rhetoric to hone these skills. It is also important to have a consistently strong academic performance in undergraduate studies.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 10/15/2015
    Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo
    Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo | Mark Leonardo
    The thing you do more than anything in law school is reading and writing. So any English major would be a plus. I have a Business degree. It played no role whatsoever in law school, but has helped in the real world regarding business dealings both in legal matters and in running a law office. Law school teaches you nothing on how to practice law in the real world or how to run a law office. It mostly teaches you how to think like a lawyer. (Which is mostly twisted thinking....) Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/15/2015
    Eranthe Law Firm
    Eranthe Law Firm | Cate Eranthe
    I don't think there is an answer to that question. Many undergraduate programs are a good foundation for the law. Economics, English, Philosophy, Political Science, History and Business to name a few. Choose something you're interested in and will get high grades in so it will help you get into law school. I had a double major in Economics and English and also took Business and Philosophy courses.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/15/2015
    KEYL ADR Services, LLC | Mark D. Keyl
    Some colleges have a curriculum for pre-law. Otherwise, most students do political science.
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 10/15/2015
    The Stutes Law Group, LLC
    The Stutes Law Group, LLC | Ronald E. Stutes
    My first advice don't major in pre-law (unless you want to be a pre-lawyer). If you do, and then decide not to go into law, the fact that you have a pre-law degree lets everybody know that you didn't follow through. I suggest looking at the curriculum for a pre-law degree and picking a major that incorporates many of its aspects, but that gives you a degree in an actual subject. English is a good choice because it gives you the ability to work with the language.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 10/15/2015
    Zarbano Law Office | Margaret Zarbano
    It doesn't matter. I have a degree in Criminal Justice. Other lawyers have degrees in English. Find one that gets your GPA high. That's what matters, high GPA. Study for the LSAT. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 10/15/2015
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
    Well, you might be surprised to learn that I do not have an undergraduate degree. Yes, that can be done. The downside is that I could not have been hired for a government job. That however is not a problem for me because I do not desire those positions. You have to think about what kind of lawyer you want to be. If you want to do courtroom work I suggest speech classes and drama classes. (really). The ability to write well is essential, so take English classes. Get on a debate team. If you want to go into the corporate world, take business classes. Personally, I wish my Spanish was better. Make sure you are fluent in Word and Adobe Acrobat Pro - this is required for filing appellate briefs and the record on appeal. Learning excel would not hurt either. A few psychology classes will be useful. You meet some real nut jobs in this business. Keep this in mind, opportunities for good paying jobs when you get out of school are limited (during the recession the junior staff was laid off at many major firms). Try to minimize your student loan debt. I see plenty of clients with major student loan debt that they cannot possibly ever pay off. I'm a bankruptcy lawyer and I like it. I hated family law. Good luck to you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Marc S. Stern
    Marc S. Stern | Marc S. Stern
    There isn't one. To a large degree it depends upon what you want do with your law degree. If you want do patent work, the hard sciences and math. If you want to defend criminals and try personal injury cases, some sociology and psychology, although, again, the hard sciences are a good basic education. Most lawyers get out of school wanting to defend criminals and try personal injury cases. Most of us do not and, after a few years are not interested in either, even if given a chance. History, political science, and anthropology are good to learn how people think and what has gone on before. Make sure you learn how to write. This means English. Writing and grammar are important. Everything we do as lawyers is impacted by the written word. If you can't read and understand what some judge is writing or has written, you worthless as a lawyer. If you cannot write a clear sentence and construct a clear argument, you are worthless to the client. In the final analysis, do not plan your major to enable you to succeed in law school. Get a broad education and learn how to write. The rest will follow.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Patrick W. Currin, Attorney at Law | Patrick Currin
    Engineering, so you can have a job.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Entertainment Law Partners
    Entertainment Law Partners | Tifanie Jodeh
    If you don't know what area of law you are interested in, then I would pick reputable schools that are approved by the ABA. From there, you need to see what the school offers as far as tuition. Obviously, your state law school will be less expensive than an out of state school or a private school. My next suggestion is to research how well the alumni supports it's new grads. For example, University of Southern California has one of the best alumni support programs.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Louis S. Haskell
    Law Office of Louis S. Haskell | Louis Haskell
    I am assuming that you want to go to law school because you cannot do STEM. If that is the case, the answer is English. Words are the tools of our trade.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Injured workers Law firm | Michele Lewane, Esquire
    I was an English major. I did fine. Personally, it doesn't matter. I think "good grades" and a high LSAT would be best. I hope good grades means you love it and enjoy what you are learning. Maybe not math/science, but it really doesn't matter. Psychology, public speaking, history, English, government- all do well. Law school requires a lot of reading, figuring out what is important in the story and what laws apply to the story and how to argue out of both sides of your mouth. It is like the game of monopoly and the game of risk. You can't even study for the LSATs. It is just figuring out puzzles. I hope this helps!
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C.
    James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C. | Jim Hasser
    Classically, English and History, but it varies widely from law school to law school. The best way to do it is to work backwards and go to the law school's (schools of your choice) requirements and find out what they are looking for. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Patricia A. Simmons
    Law Office of Patricia A. Simmons | Patrica A Simmons
    There is no one undergraduate degree or major law schools look for in potential students. What is more important is to have a diverse experience which includes your undergraduate degree. The wider your experience, the more you have to offer. Don't forget to volunteer, particularly doing any type of volunteer service in the legal area. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Lawyer for Indie Media
    Lawyer for Indie Media | Sue Basko
    I think you should get an undergraduate degree in the area of law you think you would like to practice. For example, I went to Film School. I practice law for film, music, websites, and journalism. If you want to practice medical law, go to a good pre-med program or go all the way through medical school and get and MD-JD. The law school I attended has a program for those wanting such a dual degree. If you want to practice nursing law, get a nursing degree. If you want to practice patent law, get an undergraduate degree in the area that interests you, such as a B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, or Mechanical Engineering. If you want to practice Child Law, get a degree in Child Development, Sociology, or a Masters of Science in Social Work. If you want to practice journalism law, or if you want to be a journalist who writes about the law or about court cases, go to journalism school. There are many fields of law. Whichever field of law is of interest to you, go get a Bachelors or Masters degree in that. Keep in mind that many lawyers have jobs other than being a typical lawyer. Most lawyers never go into court. If you think that is the only way to be a lawyer, spend a little time finding out about the hundreds of things that can be done with a law degree or law license. You will find that having a law degree is a very flexible thing.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
    Something with lots of public speaking, maybe drama. For everything except trial work you can sit in your office and research. Trial work requires confidence in your ability to speak and being able to think on your feet.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    WILLIAM L SANDERS, ATTORNEY AT LAW | William L. Sanders
    Good question. Congratulations on knowing your intended career path. There is no one right answer to your question. I was a business major, which equipped me for civil litigation with accounting issues. A friend was an engineering major, which helps him in engineering cases. English is a good major to develop reading and especially writing skills. Another friend was a speech and drama major. He was a superb actor in the courtroom. History may equip you to understand constitutional law better. But the problem is that almost no one ends up practicing the type of law they expected, and therefore their major can become irrelevant. How was that for a lawyer avoiding the simple question asked? My personal advice is to major in what you love - go with your passion. That just may afford you an opportunity to distinguish you from that other guy trying to get your space in that law school. What ever your major, law school will take care of the rest. Once you become a lawyer, remember you have a duty to give back to the community - without pay. Pro bono is an expectation, not an aspiration. Being a lawyer makes your service possible. Never forget, as important a lawyer though you are, there is still honor in serving others.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Adler Law Group, LLC
    Adler Law Group, LLC | Lawrence Adler
    There is no specific and best undergraduate major but it should be something that is useful particularly if you turn out not to like law school such as a degree in business. That information will be useful even in the practice of law.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    A Fresh Start
    A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
    The best undergraduate course of study for a potential lawyer is one that will teach you to think and write well. I received my degree in speech communications, but a degree in literature, any of the sciences, philosophy, or business would all teach you these skills. Study what interests you and what you will be willing to work hard to learn.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Marjorie Guymon
    It really doesn't matter. You should have food reading and writing skills. Oral argument skills are good too.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
    To my knowledge, there is no "best" undergraduate degree to have before applying for law school. My law school class (Class of 1981) had accountants, engineers, English Lit Majors, Political Science Majors, a Police Officer, and Business Majors. The best advice I can give you is to pick a major and get a degree in something where you will be able to find employment in the event that law school does not pan out for you. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Richard B. Jacobson & Associates, LLC | Richard B. Jacobson
    Sorry. There is no one major that is best preparation for law school. Don't think that it must be political science or history or economics. French or music are just as good. Find the thing you most want to study, and be sure to include electives in very different areas. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    DANIEL NESBITT
    DANIEL NESBITT | Hasse & Nesbitt
    Chemical Engineering.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Durham Jones & Pinegar | Erven Nelson
    Great question. The most important thing is to pick a major in which you can get excellent grades because that will determine which law schools you could attend. You need to be able to read with comprehension, analyze complex situations, speak persuasively and write powerfully, so I would consider English, Debate, Journalism, Creative Writing, History, Political Science and Philosophy. But, you also will need to understand numbers well, so I would also consider Accounting and Mathematics. If you would like to be involved in patents and copyrights, you could consider Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and other high tech fields. No matter which major you choose, I recommend that you have a broad based education including all of the fields I have mentioned, to the extent possible. Good Luck!
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    S. Joseph Schramm | Joseph Schramm
    Personally, my undergraduate degree was a BA with political science as my major, but just about any course of study will suffice. Nowadays many universities have courses in legal studies at the undergraduate level. These courses tend to cover the court systems generally, including some of the procedures involved in filing cases. They also tend to cover specific courses traditionally taught as part of a law school curriculum such as Torts and Real Property. I taught paralegal courses for many years and feel that persons who study these courses as part of legal studies course at the undergraduate level tend to have an easier time with the subject matter in law school. However, if your college or university does not offer a course in legal studies, simply enroll in a course of study you like and, in your senior year, take the L.S.A.T. exam and apply to law school.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Walpole Law | Robert J. Walpole
    There really is no 'best undergraduate major' for entry into law school. Many have science, engineering or mathematics backgrounds and then specialize in those areas. But to be sure, reading comprehension in the liberal arts, English, history, political science and the like, is a plus as you will be reading a lot of law. A varied background is just as important as a sure-fire ticket. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Garner Law Office
    Garner Law Office | Daniel Garner
    I followed the traditional path of political science but no particular degree is required. If you have a scientific mind, you could do well in the patent and intellectual property area with an engineering, scientific or computer science degree. Few lawyers have that technical background so you could differentiate yourself that way and command a higher salary. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Offices of Richard M. Levy P.C.
    Law Offices of Richard M. Levy P.C. | Richard M. Levy
    The honest answer is that it makes no difference what your undergraduate major is for law school. My very strong suggestion is to major in something that would prepare you for a job if you either didn't get into law school or changed your mind. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    There is no best. It all depends on what type of law you intend to practice as an attorney. You should separate law school from the practice of law. If you are looking for the hot major that will assure you a spot in the top law school, then you need to ask the admissions folks at the law school. If you are talking about practicing law, it depends on what you want to do. IF you are doing criminal law or family law, then you should study psychology or sociology or some other social science. IF you are interested in medical patent law, then you should study pre-med or engineering. If you want to practice corporate law, then you want to study business.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Gerald R. Black, Esq.
    Gerald R. Black, Esq. | Gerald R. Black
    A good technical education provides the foundation for working in a wide-variety of fields. Patent law is currently hot and requires an undergraduate technical degree. If you have an undergraduate biotech degree, you can also use that as a pre-med degree and go to medical school. Also, a good undergraduate technical degree makes you quite marketable should you decide to enter the workplace. You can opt for engineering school or for a major in physics, chemistry, biotech, or a wealth of other technologies. You should pursue the technical field that you have the greatest aptitude and have the most passion for. I hope this helps and good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Sebby Law Office
    Sebby Law Office | Jayne Sebby
    It really doesn't matter what your undergrad degree is in but it may help you decide what type and area of law you are most interested in. I had classmates with degrees in accounting, political science, nursing, law enforcement, the arts, medicine & health care, English, social sciences, engineering, environmental studies, philosophy, religion, business, history, and education. My undergrad degree was in broadcasting and film; no surprise that I now practice intellectual property law. Law schools specifically look for students from a wide variety of backgrounds both in education and in experience. That's because every student can learn additional ways to understand and interpret the law from the opinions and attitudes of others as expressed in class and in social interaction. So major in a subject you enjoy and are really interested in. Then use your law degree to enhance your career.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Offices of Carl L. Brown | Carl L. Brown
    There are so many areas of practice. If you are interested in a career as a trial lawyer, psychology would be an excellent choice in my opinion.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Robert E McCall | Robert McCall
    I am not persuaded the undergraduate major matters. Whatever you find challenging and makes you think. Law School will definitely affect the way you think and analyze an issue. Look at the 1980's movie "Paper Chase".
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C.
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C. | David Nabow Soloway
    Best wishes for your plans for law school! I admire the effort you are taking at this early stage of your career to find out more about succeeding in a career in the law. Perhaps surprising, I do not think the selection of an undergraduate major will be that consequential for becoming accepted at a law school or for succeeding as a lawyer. The undergraduate major I selected (Duke B.A. '79) was philosophy, and I do believe it was helpful in preparing me to think about well-reasoned arguments, but colleagues of mine majored in a vast array of majors, from engineering to music. There is no need to select a major before becoming acquainted with multiple areas of study when you start college, and it would be wise to select a major that is aligned with topics for which you have a passion. It also could be helpful to speak to advisers at the university you attend and even at one or more law schools that may be attractive to you - advisers frequently are very generous with their time and ready to help.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Polsinelli Shughart PC | William B. Prugh
    I do not feel that an undergrad major or minor is a critical factor for entering law school. Take the courses you are most interested in or that you excel in (to boost your GPA). I was a political science major and took undergrad accounting courses because of my interest in accounting. Some schools offer a combined JD (law) and undergrad degree with some courses counting for both degrees. I did not take this route, trying instead to get the best grades in the undergrad courses. I did get a LLM (tax) degree after law school feeling that enhanced my JD degree. Others may have different opinions. Your next choice is to prepare for and pass the LSAT (admissions) test. Last, law schools look for leadership & interest in non-academic areas, so school, civic and social clubs and groups are also important. Those are my 2 cents worth.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Utah Injury Lawyer
    Utah Injury Lawyer | Will Rodgers
    It can depend on what type of law you are interested in practicing as a lawyer. If, for example you want to be a "IP" Intellectual Property Lawyer then you need to have an engineering or chemistry type of degree (as I recall). I think Accounting (to understand business well); Political Science (to understand our great U.S. Constitution well and case law too); and Psychology (to understand how our human mind thinks); and Music (for creativity, focus and beauty among other benefits); all of those majors can all be helpful in their own way. Good luck to you on your journey. You are welcome to contact me to talk and schedule a visit to my office if you would like. I am happy to help. May God bless you and your family. Have a great day!
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    McAlpine PLLC
    McAlpine PLLC | Alonzo M. Alston, Esq.
    The one that you can get the most A's in and shows some academic rigor.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Roe Law Firm
    Roe Law Firm | Theodore M. Roe
    I've been practicing law for close to 20 years and the best answer is to seriously reconsider your desire to go to law school. I believe that if you asked most attorneys if they would do it again, most of them would answer, no. It is an extremely demanding and difficult profession. In my first 5 years of practice, I worked 90 hours a week. You will have no life outside the office for years and that is assuming that you can find employment, which in the current market the chances are somewhere between slim and none. But don't worry, your loan companies won't care, they will still want you to pay them whether you have a job or not. Keep in mind that law school is going to cost you between $130,000 and $230,000 (and since you are only just graduating high school, you can expect these numbers to go up). Do your own cost benefit analysis, including the likely salary (unless you go to a top law school it will be $35k-$50K), factor the cost of cost of office space and insurance and all the other costs to run an office, unless you are that confident you can find a job (which in the current market is only 33%). Factor in your cost of living, rent, food, transportation, etc. Then take a hard look at whether you want to devote some of the best years of your life to working like a slave. There was a time that the legal profession made sense, but I simply don't think that it makes sense economically anymore and this website is the perfect example of it. People expect legal advice for free are and generally unable or unwilling to pay for it. Don't destroy your life. Don't go to law school.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Barton R. Resnicoff | Barton R. Resnicoff
    There are a number that can be helpful. Pre-law concentration, which may be a part of a Poli Sci program is one approach. Another is English(writing is a big part of practicing law). Logical reasoning is also important, does that include philosophy or some science. It also depends upon what area of the law you might be interested in, as having a strong undergraduate background in that subject could help. Finally, an accounting program might help if you want to deal with tax law. I could go on, practicing law can permit you to use almost any undergraduate study to your assistance.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    I would suggest a strong business background, preferably accounting, coupled with economics, history or philosophy as a minor. Part or your determination should be your interests, and you plan regarding what type of law you would like to practice.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    The Krone Law Firm, LLC | Norman B. Krone
    I don't think that there is a "best, but I will suggest that you consider a major that will cause you to learn to read and write. That is not a general liberal arts degree! Consider one of the sciences or journalism.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Kirk Buhler
    Law Office of Kirk Buhler | Kirk A Buhler
    A great deal depends upon the type of law you want to practice. Some types (like intellectual property) require a BS in Engineering or a science like Physics or chemistry. If you want to practice international law, political science would be helpful. A strong background in business can help with contracts.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Microtechnology Law & Analysis | Daniel Flamm
    I would aim for a science or engineering degree. That will give you the flexibility to tackle and understand most anything, qualify you for patent law should you be interested, or provide a sound foundation to deal with evidence relating to personal or financial branches of law (criminal, torts, corporate etc.). It is something you won't get in law school.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    D.J. Rausa, Attorney at Law | D.J. Rausa
    Mathematics.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
    It depends upon what you want to do. Excel in whatever excites you so you can get good grades. A close friend has a degree in Music and finds it helpful in law. Another has her degree in English which is helpful for writing. I have a degree in Business. If you intend to have your own practice in the future consider a business degree. Honestly there is NO best degree Just get good grades!
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Stuart M. Nachbar, P.C.
    Law Office of Stuart M. Nachbar, P.C. | Stuart M. Nachbar
    Writing is essential so being an English major is good, as is being a political science major.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Glenn Milgraum PC
    Glenn Milgraum PC | Glenn P. Milgraum
    Anything goes. The best advice I received was to take the courses you most enjoy as you will most likely get better grades. Although I started as a "Classics" major, I graduated with a degree in archaeology.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Nichols Law Firm
    Nichols Law Firm | Michael J. Nichols
    Math.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Michael Johnson
    Law Office of Michael Johnson | Michael Johnson
    English.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Ty Wilson Law | Ty Wilson
    The best major is what you want to do where you can also keep your grades high for the entry of law school. The reality is law touches everything we do in life so you should ask yourself what are of the law am I interested in? Then get an undergraduate degree in that major. If after you finish your major you decide you do not want to go to law school you have a major in an area you are interested in working. If you wish to continue on pursuing your law degree do so with an interest in pursuing the same area. First year law school is similar everywhere after that first year you are given more flexibility to pursue courses in the areas of law you are interested in. The day of the general practitioner is all but dead, the law is deep on all issues it address so pick one and go. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    History, political science, philosophy, and of course common sense.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Danville Law Group | Scott Jordan
    I am not sure if there is one best major. I know many with a science or business background. Generally, a degree in political science or philosophy seems to fit well with how lawyers think. But, I would advise that you obtain a major that fits you and where you can obtain the best grades. If you think you want to be a corporate lawyer, take business or economics. If you want to be a criminal lawyer, take political science or criminal justice. And so forth.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Offices of Gerard A Fierro
    Law Offices of Gerard A Fierro | Gerard A Fierro
    Majors are varied among law students. I was a business student. You should think about what type of lawyer you may want to be. Some students are studying engineering and sciences if they perhaps want to be a patents lawyer. Some may be interested in environmental, taxation or corporations. Many student have studied criminal justice, political science or public policy. You should examine your interests and choose a field where you can excel.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    O'Keefe Legal Services, L.L.C.
    O'Keefe Legal Services, L.L.C. | Sean P. O'Keefe
    Traditionally law school applicants probably studied and majored in political science or pre-law, but schools seem to always be looking for diversity so there is no "best major" answer. Do what interests you, whether it is social sciences, performing arts, etc., and take some courses that are law related to get a feel for the subject matter. For example, constitutional law is usually popular and interesting in college. Laws schools like people prepared for the difficult program, so they want students who are prepared to read, write, and analyze material quickly and effectively.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    The Law Office of Eric J Smith
    The Law Office of Eric J Smith | Eric Smith
    You can succeed in law school with any undergraduate major. More important than your classwork (though good grades are a must, to get into the best school you can and find scholarships to keep the cost manageable) is exposure to the law. Volunteer for legal non-profits. Work as a runner in law firms. Volunteer for local politicians or campaigns. Your first year of law school defines whether you make law review, what summer clerkships you get and basically sets the course for your legal career. Having exposure to the law will give you both direction as to where you might want to practice and exposure to the otherwise new and daunting vocabulary that sets people back when they first get to law school. And with exposure to the actual practice of law, you might save your money and not go.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
    Law is the one field where you can use everything that you have ever learned in your life, at some point. The best undergraduate major for you depends on what area within the law that you want to pursue. You want to be a trial lawyer? Take acting courses, public speaking, debating. You want to handle injury cases? Take biology, chemistry and physics, as well as acting and debating. You want to be a business or tax lawyer? Take accounting, business courses, tax courses, and of course, take English and grammar so you can write a professional letter. You want to be a criminal attorney? Either learn about science, or surround yourself with scientific types who can educate you and who will testify for you. Also, acting and debating. Sound logical? It should be. I've been doing this for 45 years.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Vandervoort, Christ & Fisher, P.C. | James E. Reed
    I suggest you major in something you enjoy and in which you expect to get high grades. I don't believe any particular major is more helpful than any other. I didn't find anything I had done before law school provided much assistance in law school. I majored in mathematics because I enjoyed it.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Atterbury, Kammer & Haag, S.C. | Lee R. Atterbury
    The best majors would be philosophy or history.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Fox & Fox, S.C. | Richard F. Rice
    Any good college that provides a basis for learning.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Banner & Witcoff, Ltd. | Ernie Linek
    Great question - and best of luck to you in your future studies. Some areas of the law need specific college training, such as: Patent law - you need a science or engineering degree (mandatory) Taxation law - an accounting degree will be very helpful (but not mandatory) Great lawyers can have any background training - history, business, communications, political science, etc. Best thing to do is find what you like in college - and learn all you can. AGAIN - GOOD LUCK.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    David M. Driscoll | David M. Driscoll
    It really depends on what type of law you might be interested in. A general business degree could lead to general business law for example. I am a patent attorney so an engineering or physics undergraduate degree is needed. You should try to think ahead of what type of law you might be interested in. Hope this helps a little.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Mediation Services of Southwest Florida
    Mediation Services of Southwest Florida | Dennis J. Leffert, J.D.
    Inasmuch as law is, mostly, working with ?people?, you might consider Psychology as a good pre-law major. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Joshua R.I. Cohen
    Law Office of Joshua R.I. Cohen | Joshua Cohen
    No such thing. Just do well, and make sure it gets you used to writing, reading, and analysis. Each major has its pro and con towards law school. I went to undergrad never wanting to be a lawyer, and yet got in to law school just fine. Again, the important part is to do well at whatever major you choose.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Anything technical, like math, engineering, science...etc. If you must have a liberal arts degree, then I'd say economics. You see, 90% of all applicants have degrees in business, English, history, political science...etc, and your application will simply will be stacked at the bottom of the pile.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/14/2015
    Edelman, Combs, Latturner & Goodwin, LLC | Daniel A. Edelman
    I suggest history.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/14/2015
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