What are the requirements to get a divorce? 31 Answers as of June 13, 2011

My spouse and I want to get a divorce. There are no specific reasons, but we are both unhappy. Will this suffice in court?

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Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
Texas recognizes "irreconcilable differences" as grounds for divorce. My recommendation is the two of you hire one lawyer to draft all the pleadings, waivers, and final decree, you can do this yourselves if you want to invest the time, but in the long run, a lawyer is cheaper. For example, my office handles "agreed divorces" for $500 plus cost. Court cost are about $300. I have heard of parties buying a Do-It-Yourself divorce kit for $250 on the internet. Which is $250 less than hiring my firm to do it, since the filing fees, copy charges, certified fees, etc. are the same. But when you get to the end, do you know what to do, how to schedule a prove-up, how to get certified copies?
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 6/13/2011
Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
In Connecticut, you can get a divorce without having any particular reason. All you need is to state that the marriage has completely broken down and there is no chance of getting back together.
Answer Applies to: Connecticut
Replied: 6/13/2011
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
Yep. Incompatibility is a basis for divorce. If you have kids, try to work it out. Every couple fights. Stay well.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 6/9/2011
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
If you live in NY state, yes, it will suffice. Other state may still have a grounds requirement, but NY has finally become a no fault state. Consult with a local matrimonial attorney. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/9/2011
Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law
Neville J. Bedford Attorney at Law | Neville J. Bedford
Here in Rhode Island the "no fault " grounds are called "irreconcilable differences" that is the legal equivalent of "we are both not happy"
Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
Replied: 6/9/2011
    Beresford Booth PLLC
    Beresford Booth PLLC | S. Scott Burkhalter
    In Washington State, you do not need to established fault, just that the marriage is irretrievably broken.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Gresham Family & Bankruptcy Law
    Gresham Family & Bankruptcy Law | Lillian Suelzle Watson
    To answer your question regarding finding fault in order to get a divorce - This is a no fault state and all that is required is "irrevocable differences" You are able to file for divorce jointly as long as you agree on how your assets and liabilities are divided. You can also use a mediator- lawyer to prepare the papers for you both, or one party hire an attorney and the other sign off on the final divorce, both agreeing to how it is written. If you need to speak with an attorney about your options, please call for a consultation. Mention that you located us on this web site, and we will give you a discount for the initial visit. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Office of Jackie Robert Geller
    Law Office of Jackie Robert Geller | Jackie Robert Geller
    This depends upon the particular state you reside in. California, for example, doesn't require any specific reason other than "irreconcilable differences".
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Palomino Law Firm, P.C.
    Palomino Law Firm, P.C. | Debra Palomino
    Arizona is a no fault divorce state, you can obtain a divorce based on irreconcilable differences.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Glenn E. Tanner
    Glenn E. Tanner | Glenn E. Tanner
    yes. Washington is a no fault state. You don't need to have a reason- just testify that the marriage is irretrievably broken and there is no hope for reconciliation. Consider the collaborative method of divorcing.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Seattle Divorce Services
    Seattle Divorce Services | Michael V. Fancher
    Washington is a no fault state. You are entitled to a divorce if you want one. You will need to affirm that the marriage is irretrievably broken.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A.
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A. | Joanna Mitchell
    Florida is a "no fault" State. So, if you are unhappy and no longer want to be married, then this is sufficient grounds for a divorce. Your marriage is irretrievably broken.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    Divorce in Colorado only requires that the marriage be irretrievably broken. That generally only requires one party's belief, so if you are both in agreement the marriage will be dissolved there is definitely no obstacle. Any problems may depend on the terms of the divorce as to financial issues and, if applicable, parenting issues for children.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    In many states, irreconcilable differences (your situation) is sufficient for a divorce. In other "no-fault" states a reason for divorce need not be stated. You may be a candidate for dissolution. Contact a local domestic relations attorney to save some money.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    In Georgia, it is not required that a party allege a fault ground. The parties can simply allege that the marriage is "irretrievably broken" and that will suffice. You should retain a divorce lawyer in your community. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
    That is more than enough. All you need are "irreconcilable differences", and those are the generic words that you recite to the Court in person or through a Stipulated Judgment, and you'll get the divorce.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of Patricia Van Haren
    Law Office of Patricia Van Haren | Patricia Van Haren
    In California, there are no requirements for getting a divorce. Parties may divorce for "irreconcilable differences."
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    Assume Oregon law: Oregon is a no fault state. You do not have to have a reason; just irreconcilable differences. Nothing specific so you can get a divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of Karen A. Clark, L.L.C.
    Law Office of Karen A. Clark, L.L.C. | Karen A. Clark
    Washington is a no-fault state. You will not be asked why you want to divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Edward Papa, Esq.
    Edward Papa, Esq. | Edward Papa
    Most jurisdictions have some form of "no-fault" divorce. New York now has no fault divorce and spouses are allowed to terminate their marriages within a period of six months after declaring that their marriage is "irretrievably" broken down.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Michael Apicella
    Michael Apicella | Apicella Law and Mediation
    If you're in California, then yes, it doesn't matter the reason why a couple wants a divorce. California is a "no-fault" state. Meaning, you only check a box on the divorce form that states "irreconcilable differences." If you plan to file for divorce in Sonoma or Marin County, feel free to contact my office for assistance. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    That is reason enough in California. It is called irreconcilable differences. If you are in my area and are looking for an attorney, please contact me for a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    The English Law Firm
    The English Law Firm | Robert English
    In California, an assertion of irreconcilable differences will suffice.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller | Jody A. Miller
    If you live in a no-fault state such as Georgia you do not need any reason other than the marriage is irretrievably broken.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    I am afraid that there are a number of issues that must be decided in a divorce. The difficulty and length of the divorce may depend on how long it takes the parties to resolve those issues including the division of debts and assets and addressing any issues related to children or spousal maintenance.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Willick Law Group
    Willick Law Group | Marshal S. Willick
    All States now have a no-fault basis for divorce; NY was the last hold-out, and adopted it this past year.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Arnold & Wadsworth
    Arnold & Wadsworth | Brian Arnold
    Depends on the state but most likely that is enough. Irreconcilable differences is your cause.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Fox Law Firm LLC
    Fox Law Firm LLC | Tina Fox
    Yes, in IL this is what is considered irreconcilable differences. You can call the office to discuss what requirements are needed to claim irreconcilable difference.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law | Gregory T. Buckley
    In Florida, you only need to allege that the marriage is irretrievably broken, since it is a no-fault state. The requirements may be different in your state.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    That depends on the state, and you omitted that. In many states there is a no-fault ground. In those the answer is yes. In some, fault is required, and the answer is no. Where do you live?
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/8/2011
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