What are my deposition rights? 6 Answers as of February 08, 2012

I am being deposed in my girlfriends family law case, I have a previous felony conviction. Am I required in the deposition to discuss the details of that case? It's nearly 10 years since the conviction and I've completed all probation requirements.

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Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
At your deposition, you are required to truthfully answer the questions posed to you, except for questions objected to as being in improper form. If questioned about a prior felony conviction, you are required to testify about that conviction, since conviction of a felony is a proper legal basis for impeachment of a testifier's credibility. You could retain an attorney to attend and represent you for the deposition, if you wish, so that the attorney could advise you before the deposition and/or during breaks of the deposition (even during its proceedings), and make objections to questions posed.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/8/2012
Walnut Creek Family Law Center, Inc. | Merritt L. Weisinger
You may well be required to disclose it depending upon the issues in the case. If, for example, custody is in issue, your conviction for a child-related offense would be relevant. I suggest you consider having legal counsel there to protect you or that you notice a motion for a protective order sufficiently in advance of the deposition so that you can define the parameters. Further, in view of the time that has elapsed since you completed probation, you should promptly have the conviction expunged. It's quick and cheap and once that has happened you will not have been convicted of a felony.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/8/2012
Peyton and Associates | Barbara Peyton
You will be under oath during your deposition. Two pieces of advice: 1: Don't lie. 2: Get an attorney for the deposition.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/7/2012
Edwin Fahlen Attorney at Law
Edwin Fahlen Attorney at Law | Edwin Fahlen
At all cost you must have legal representation at the deposition. A competent attorney can protect your rights and make proper legal objections to protect both yourself, and your spouse. This is not an area of law for you to take care of yourself if you value your spouse?s relationship and her case. Without legal representation yourself, you can count on being taken advantage of at the deposition which could have been avoided. Legal representation may either be neutral, or could cost your spouse the custody of the child.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/6/2012
Elizabeth Jones, A Professional Corporation
Elizabeth Jones, A Professional Corporation | Elizabeth Jones
They can ask about felony convictions as it goes to credibility. But you can include just what you said in your question.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/6/2012
    Diefer Law Group, P.C.
    Diefer Law Group, P.C. | Abel Fernandez
    You might need to get an attorney to get legal advice as to what the other side can ask of you. They can ask all information that is relevant to their case and your felony conviction might be relevant to the case.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/6/2012
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