What are my chances of getting child support from the biological father? How? 16 Answers as of December 20, 2013

My child is due in February. The father of my child is in the army and says he won’t have to pay me child support. I got pregnant when I was 17 and he was 20 so he refuses to sign the birth certificate. Is there a way I can make him sign the birth certificate and send me child support?

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Law Offices of Helene Ellenbogen, P.S.H | Helene Ellenbogen
You can file a parentage action once the child is born. The court will order him to have a DNA test and he will become the legal father with all the rights and responsibilities that go with it. If you don't want him in the child's life, then don't do this but don't expect child support either. In the meantime, you can talk to his superior officer once the child is get help persuading him to sign the affidavit of paternity (you don't sign a birth certificate) once the child is born. None of this can be done before the child is born.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 12/19/2013
J. Barbour Rixey, P.C.
J. Barbour Rixey, P.C. | J. Barbour Rixey
As soon as the child is born file a petition for child support. If he contests paternity then the Court will order DNA testing. Once he is determined to be the father the support will be retroactive to the date of filing the petition. He will be ordered to pay it and there can be an allotment set up through DFAS or an income deduction order which DFAS will honor. Don't worry about him signing the birth cert. A paternity order will establish him as the father.
Answer Applies to: Virginia
Replied: 12/19/2013
Attorney at Law
Attorney at Law | Frances An
Yes. Go to the Department of Child Support Services in your county. They will help you. They can have the support taken out of his pay. He will learn.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/19/2013
Goldstein and Peck. P.C.
Goldstein and Peck. P.C. | William J. Kupinse, Jr
The chances of collecting child support from the biological father are good. You may wish to contact the State child support enforcement bureau.
Answer Applies to: Connecticut
Replied: 12/19/2013
Provda Law Firm
Provda Law Firm | Bruce Provda
You can take him to court to have paternity proved.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 12/19/2013
    Strowbridge Blaisdel Richardson | Strowbridge Richardson
    Yes and Yes Do a paternity test and then file for support. Contact DCSS as a starter.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/20/2013
    Jeffery M. Navarro, Attorney at Law | Jeffery M. Navarro
    You will have to sue him to determine paternity and to determine the amount of child support.
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 12/19/2013
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    Yes, contact his commanding officer and the local JAG. He will be in so much trouble he will be more than happy to sign and pay child support through allotment. You may have to file a petition to determine paternity, child support and custody to get the ball rolling. However, it is my understanding that the military does not like their members to ignore their parental obligations.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 12/19/2013
    Milligan, Beswick, Levine, & Knox LLP
    Milligan, Beswick, Levine, & Knox LLP | Stephen P Levine
    File a Petition to Establish Paternity and a request for Child Support naming him as the defendant or go to your local Department of Child Support Services to help you
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/18/2013
    Law Offices of Lauren H. Kane | Lauren H. Kane
    You need to file for child support but he can contest paternity and request blood tests. If these prove positive, he will have an obligation to you barring any unusual services.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 12/18/2013
    Law Office of Annette M. Cox, PLLC
    Law Office of Annette M. Cox, PLLC | Annette M. Cox
    You will need to file a petition to establish paternity, decision-making/parenting time and child support. A court can order him to take a DNA test, and then if he is found to be the biological father, he will have an obligation to pay support. You can also consider going to the Arizona Department of Economic Security for assistance. It can help establish paternity and obtain child support on your child's behalf. It will not however address any custody/visitation issues.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 12/18/2013
    Diane l. Berger | Diane L. Berger
    You can't make him sign the birth certificate but you can file a paternity action and if he denies that he is the father, the court can require that he take a DNA test to determine paternity. if he is the father, he will be required to pay child support. By the way, none of this will in any way help his career with the army so he might want to voluntarily get involved.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 12/18/2013
    Elizabeth Jones, A Professional Corporation
    Elizabeth Jones, A Professional Corporation | Elizabeth Jones
    When the baby is born go to your local child support services and open a case. They will take care of collecting support from him. The military frowns upon dead beat dads.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/18/2013
    Law Offices of Arlene D. Kock
    Law Offices of Arlene D. Kock | Arlene D. Kock
    File and serve your paternity petition establishing the parental rights for father as well as a motion for custody visitation and child support. Was the court hears this matter the judge will calculate support and develop the parenting plan. That support can be taken out of your exes pay pursuant to the court order.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/18/2013
    Petit & Dommershausen SC
    Petit & Dommershausen SC | Tajara Dommershausen
    Yes, go ask for services from the state (Badger care, food share, daycare assistance) the State will then establish paternity and be in contact with the military to get you child support and other military benefits.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 12/18/2013
    John Russo | John Russo
    Yes it is called going to court.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 12/18/2013
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