What are the laws regarding visas contingent on college athletics? 8 Answers as of September 09, 2011

I am engaged to an immigrant from South Africa who was granted a four year visa contingent on him playing college level soccer. Due to some discrepancies in his scholarship,(they gave him less money than promised) he was forced to quit the team. Hence, he is in violation of his VISA. No sports, no citizenship and he has a pending trial in September. We are engaged and wondering what legal steps we should take to ensure he stays in the US so we can marry. Or should we marry immediately? Thank you.

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Pacifica Legal Services
Pacifica Legal Services | Floyd Fernandez
The short answer is, marry. If you are genuinely in love, marry. Then petition for him, and notify the court. But for this, YOU NEED A LAWYER, specializing in immigration.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/9/2011
The Law Offices Jonathan D Montag
The Law Offices Jonathan D Montag | Jonathan D Montag
Dear Sir or Madame: I can respond to your question in general terms. Do not construe this response as legal advice as I would have to meet with you and learn a lot more facts about your case to see if the general principles in my answer apply to your specific case or if facts in your case make the general principle inapplicable. Generally speaking: A person can adjust status to that of a permanent resident through marriage to a United States citizen as long as that person entered the United States with inspection or was paroled into the United States even if that person is not currently in lawful status.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/20/2011
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law | Linda Liang
I assume you are US citizen. But you are not clear on what kind of trial is pending. What do you mean by "in violation of visa", he overstayed? Without these info, no advice can be given.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 7/20/2011
Law Offices of Caro Kinsella
Law Offices of Caro Kinsella | Caro Kinsella, Esq.
You need to marry him, providing it is not to circumvent immigration laws.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 7/19/2011
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Reza Athari
As I have said before, marriage is for love and nothing else. You should not marry for immigration benefits. The main issue here is if your fiance violated his student visa. If so, he will have to go back to his country. But if he is not a student visa violator and if you decide to get married, we can help your fiance to become a permanent resident. To find out if he is a student visa violator, you should consult with an experienced immigration attorney.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 7/19/2011
    Kevin Bluitt, Attorney at Law
    Kevin Bluitt, Attorney at Law | Kevin Bluitt
    Sounds like he violated the conditions of his visa as such the pending "trial" is most likely immigration court where he is in removal proceedings...in some cases marriage to a US citizen will allow him to adjust his status...of course the marriage will be presumed to be fraudulent because he is in removal proceedings....it will be his burden to show marriage is bona fide and not just to avoid removal..best to hire an attorney....very tricky area...give me a call
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/19/2011
    Clifford Togo Sakata
    Clifford Togo Sakata | Clifford Togo Sakata
    Hi, Yes. You can marry your fiancee and apply for his green card. However, the marriage must be real. Also, the procedures are fairly complicated, so I would recommend that you contact an immigration attorney to help you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/19/2011
    Fong & Associates
    Fong & Associates | William D. Fong
    If you are a US citizen and get married; and he made a lawful entry to the US, then he can file for his permanent residence in the US. If he is deemed to be out of status, this status violation will be forgiven under section 245(a).
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/19/2011
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