What are the consequences for being charged with VC 14610.5(a)(1)? 5 Answers as of June 26, 2013

I had my own answer sheet when I rewrote the exam on the same day.

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Law Offices of Scott Tibbedeaux
Law Offices of Scott Tibbedeaux | Scott Tibbedeaux
Under VC 14610.5(a)(1), the first conviction under this section is punishable as either an infraction or a misdemeanor.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/19/2011
Nelson & Lawless
Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
Youll learn the actual charge[s] filed against you when you appear for arraignment at your first court hearing. The prosecutor can amend at any time he feels he can prove additional or different charges. A first conviction under this section is punishable as either an infraction or a misdemeanor ; a second or subsequent conviction is punishable as a misdemeanor. When charged with a misdemeanor, you potentially face up to 6-12 months in jail, plus fines up to $1000. If this constitutes a probation or parole violation, factor those new and old charge[s] in as well. DMV takes such things seriously, I would assume you will be charged with a misdemeanor. If serious about hiring counsel to help you in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/7/2011
The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann
The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann | Christopher J. McCann
The code states it can be punished as an infraction (which would incur a fine only of likely a few hundred dollars), or as a misdemeanor. When no punishment is indicated, technically it carries up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine, though I would expect your punishment would be much less and likely not include jail time. It depends on the nature of your actions and which DA's office is prosecuting this.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/7/2011
Attorney at Law
Attorney at Law | Michael J. Kennedy
If it is the first time, conviction can be punished as either an infraction of misdemeanor. Depending on what exactly the sheet reads and how it was used, it could be a crib sheet, regardless of the fact that the person prepared it herself for previous use: "A 'crib sheet' or 'cribbing device' is any paper or device designed for cheating by supplying examination answers without questions to an applicant for the purpose of fraudulently qualifying the applicant for any class of driver's license, permit, or certificate." VC 273.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/6/2011
Law Offices of Elliott Zarabi
Law Offices of Elliott Zarabi | Elliott Zarabi
Maximum you can be held for is a misdemeanor right now, there is a possibility of making it an infraction though.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/26/2013
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