Was the police officer supposed to read my Miranda rights when he re-arrested me? 9 Answers as of April 29, 2013

I was in jail and was brought to court. I was released and put on supervised probation. The police re-arrested me but did not read my Miranda rights.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
LeadfootSpeedingTicket.com
LeadfootSpeedingTicket.com | Andrea Storey Rogers
Police officers can arrest you without reading you your Miranda rights. They only need to read you your rights if they want to interrogate you while you're in police custody and use your testimony against you in court.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 4/29/2013
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
If you need specific legal advice for your particular circumstances, I encourage you to privately consult with a lawyer. If you are charged with an offense and cannot afford to pay for your own defense, the court may appoint you an attorney payable at the public's expense. For certain types of charges, you have a right to counsel. The police only need to advise you of your Miranda rights when they plan to interrogate you while you are in custody. There are plenty of situations where the police have no plans to interrogate anyone so they don't bother to issue the Miranda rights when they arrest someone. Whether the arrest itself was valid, however, ultimately depends on a litany of other factors as well. If you need specific legal advice for your particular circumstances, I encourage you to privately consult with a lawyer.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 4/25/2013
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Police only have to read you Miranda if after the arrest they want to interrogate you.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 4/24/2013
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
Although an officer should read you your Miranda rights when you are arrested, it is not absolutely necessary as long as you are not questioned about the crime for which you were arrested or were detained during the questioning. Miranda only acts to suppress any statements you gave the police after you are arrested or detained. It does not invalidate an arrest.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/24/2013
Bush Law Group
Bush Law Group | James Falk
If a police officer did not read you your Miranda rights it does not affect the legality of your arrest. However, if you made a statement while in custody and the police did not first read you your Miranda rights, the statement can be suppressed at your trial.
Answer Applies to: South Carolina
Replied: 4/24/2013
    William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
    Only if the prosecution seeks to introduce into evidence a statement that you made the officer in response to the officers questions in while you're in custody without warning, then does Miranda matter. Otherwise, it does not.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 4/24/2013
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    There are many misconceptions regarding Miranda rights, and it is not universally true that you must be given them on your arrest. If you have questions you will have to speak with an attorney about your specific situation.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/24/2013
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    They only have to read you your rights if they want to question you.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 4/24/2013
    Henry Lebensbaum | Henry Lebensbaum
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 4/24/2013
Click to View More Answers: