The judge said that my grandson will be eligible for bootcamp will this guarantee that he will indeed go to a bootcamp? 29 Answers as of May 28, 2013

During court proceedings, the judge told my grandson that after eleven months of time served that he would be eligible for bootcamp, will this guarantee that he will be able to go bootcamp?

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James M. Osak, P.C.
James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
NO.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/22/2013
Law Office of Richard Williams
Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
Just because he is eligible for bootcamp does not mean he will be accepted. He will still have to likely pass the physical and otherwise meet the qualifications set forth for bootcamp admission.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 9/16/2012
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
This depends on if he is accepted into boot camp. If he has physical, medical or psychological problems he may not be allowed in. The judge's OK is just the first step to getting in.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/16/2012
Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD
Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD | Mace Yampolsky
No.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 5/22/2013
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
No, there are no guarantees here, only a suggestion that he may be eligible for that program.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 9/16/2012
    William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law
    William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law | William C. Gosnell
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Tennessee
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    No. The judge was just commenting on the possibility of bootcamp. What makes you think that it is an actual guarantee? The defendant would have to qualify fully.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    Your grandson will go to bootcamp only IF ordered by the judge AND there is bed space. When the judge says eligible, it usually means that the judge is nto ordering it, but giving a person hope.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    Eligibility is not a guarantee. There must be space in the bootcamp first.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    VANJOHNSON LAW FIRM, LLC
    VANJOHNSON LAW FIRM, LLC | Anthony Overton Van Johnson
    Based on the information you provided, being "eligible" for boot camp is not the same thing as being ordered to attend boot camp. The final decision of the court rules. For example, just because an individual is "eligible for 'First Offender', it does not mean that the person will be permitted to enter a plea under the "First Offender Act". If you have not already done so, you should retain the services of an attorney to represent your grandson.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    The fact that you are eligible for shock incarceration or "boot camp" as it is known does not mean that you will get in since there are limited spots and certain requirements. If you can afford an attorney it will help to have him contact the counselors who will review the applicants and make the final decisions.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Without seeing the judge's order, I cannot say with certainty; however, if the judge indicated this to be the case, I would say there is a good chance.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
    Your grand son will have to stay out of trouble before he is admitted to bootcamp. I don't know what county you are dealing with and whether they take everyone who is eligible.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    There are no guarantees in life. He was told he might be ?eligible?. He needs to apply for it when that time arrives. If he maintains a clean record, he might get it, subject to room available at that time.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    He still needs to qualify by the rules of boot camp - but he probably will get in.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
    The problem with boot camp aka work ethic camp (WEC) is that the camp is located on McNeil Island and other than the Special Commitment Center it is my understanding that the rest of the facilities managed by the Department of Corrections at McNeil Island (including WEC are closed).
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    I don't trust those "boot camp" programs you should tell his parents to have a sit down with your son and his lawyer to go over all of his options.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Mary W Craig P.C. | Mary W Craig
    Being eligible for something is no guarantee that he will be accepted. However, if a judge is telling you he's eligible, then there's a likelihood he'll be accepted.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Law Office of Bernal Peter Ojeda | Bernal Peter Ojeda
    Never guarantees but yes if judge gives an indicated sentence then 90 percent done.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Law Office of Jared C. Winter
    Law Office of Jared C. Winter | Jared C. Winter
    A mere statement of eligibility is not a guarantee.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Langford Law Firm
    Langford Law Firm | Theresa Langford
    Actually, it technically does not. It means that the judge has structured the sentencing so that it does not deny him the opportunity to apply if he is otherwise eligible. It does not guarantee acceptance.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 9/16/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    There are no guarantees in criminal law. Ultimately the decision will be up to the Department of Corrections. If your grandson proves to be a disciplinary problem, he may be denied the opportunity.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/16/2012
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