Since I cannot afford my own representation, can I directly contact my ex-husbands attorney? 24 Answers as of July 11, 2013

Since I cannot afford my own representation, can I directly contact my ex-husband's attorney to discuss modifications to divorce decree?

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Law Office of Karen A. Clark, L.L.C.
Law Office of Karen A. Clark, L.L.C. | Karen A. Clark
There is no prohibition against an unrepresented spouse contacting the attorney of a represented spouse to discuss the case. If you feel comfortable discussing resolving your legal marital issues with that attorney, then you should do so. If you feel uncomfortable speaking to that attorney, you might want to seek out some form of alternate dispute resolution.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/18/2011
Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law
Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law | Gregory T. Buckley
If you are representing yourself, you do have the right to call the other attorney directly to discuss the case.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 7/12/2011
Vincent J. Bernabei LLC
Vincent J. Bernabei LLC | Vincent J. Bernabei
Yes. If the attorney still represents your ex husband. Otherwise, you should discuss this with your ex husband.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 7/5/2011
ROWE LAW FIRM
ROWE LAW FIRM | Jeffrey S. Wittenbrink
You may always discuss matters with the other side's attorney if you are not represented. They will not give you legal advice, and are bound to advise you that they are representing your spouse's best interests. If you are truly indigent, you should seek representation or advice from your nearest Legal Services Corporation grantee (legal aid).
Answer Applies to: Louisiana
Replied: 7/1/2011
Beresford Booth PLLC
Beresford Booth PLLC | S. Scott Burkhalter
Yes. You may contact the attorney. You are representing yourself ("Pro Se").
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 7/1/2011
    Fredric H. Aaron, Attorney at Law, P.C.
    Fredric H. Aaron, Attorney at Law, P.C. | Fredric Harlan Aaron
    There is nothing preventing you from contacting your ex-husband's attorney, but you should keep in mind that he does not represent you and will not take any action against the interests of your ex-husband in order to help you. You might consider contacting a women's group to see if there is an attorney willing to assist you on a pro bono basis.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    The English Law Firm
    The English Law Firm | Robert English
    If you have no attorney, then yes, you could contact your ex's attorney directly.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/11/2013
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    You should file your appearance with the court as a self represented party.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    Not only can you contact the attorney, you absolutely have to deal with the other party's attorney because you are choosing to "be your own attorney" and the court will expect you to do what an attorney would do, if you had one.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    Yes you can, but it is not suggested. If your ex has money and has started a law suit against you, you may be able to get the court to direct him to pay for your attorneys fees. Ask for a free consultation with a matrimonial attorney and ask about that. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A.
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A. | Joanna Mitchell
    Yes. If you are not represented, then you can discuss your case directly with his attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Law Offices of John J. Ferry, Jr.
    Law Offices of John J. Ferry, Jr. | John J. Ferry, Jr.
    Since you are not represented by counsel, there are no ethical problems with your ex's attorney talking with you. However, you should keep in mind at all times that your ex's attorney represents your ex. Nothing is privileged. The attorney can and will pass along anything you say to your ex. Further, your ex's attorney will advocate for your ex's position and try to get the best deal for your ex. So be extremely careful!
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    The Coyle Law Office
    The Coyle Law Office | T. Andrew Coyle
    Yes, you can contact the other attorney directly. There is no requirement that you have your own attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni | Jay W. Neff
    Yes. If you are representing yourself, you can talk to your ex-spouse's attorney. However, there is no requirement that the attorney talk to you.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Yes. If you do not have counsel, you may communicate directly with the opposing attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    Hmm..."modifications to the divorce decree." If the court has issued a judgment entry including a decree of divorce, there is no easy way to change that. You certainly may contact opposing counsel, who will likely tell you that since the divorce is over, he no longer represents your husband. Best bet: contact your husband, get him to agree to your change. get a lawyer to have the court accept the change and do not try this without counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
    You are representing yourself so of course you may contact his attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Seattle Divorce Services
    Seattle Divorce Services | Michael V. Fancher
    If you are not represented, then you are your own representative and as such can communicate directly with your husband's attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    You could do it, but frankly that would be extremely foolish and there is nothing worse that you could do. (In other words, do NOT do it!) His lawyer is required to represent ONLY his interests and do everything he can to completely win the case against you. Everything you say will be used against you. No one can afford not to have a lawyer, especially where the other side has one. Bear in mind that making things worse could be very costly to you. Find a way to get counsel. That is perhaps the most important thing you can do to improve your position in your case.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Loveless Law Firm, LLP
    Loveless Law Firm, LLP | Andrea Loveless
    yes, you can certainly represent yourself "in pro per."
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
    You can, but you could possibly qualify for an attorney's fee order, and you would be far safer if you are represented by your own attorney in dealings with your husband's attorney. If your husband is represented by counsel, you should at least consult with experienced Family Law Attorneys in your local area, to determine whether you can find an attorney to represent you and seek an order for Attorney's Fees, to fund whatever work is needed. If the "decree" that you address is a proposed Judgment, you would best be served by an experienced Family Law Attorney's dealing with your husband's attorney. If the Judgment has already been entered, and there has been a material change of circumstances since its entry, you may qualify for a modification of certain terms, but again, you would best be served by retaining an experienced Family Law Attorney to represent you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Paul Wallin
    YES. Since you do not have a lawyer you are acting as your own lawyer. This means you can contact your ex husbands lawyer directly.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller | Jody A. Miller
    I would imagine that you have the right to represent yourself, and if that's the case you can talk/negotiate with your ex's attorney. I would double check this with a quick phone call to a local attorney, but I would think in most states you have the right to represent yourself.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/29/2011
    Arnold & Wadsworth
    Arnold & Wadsworth | Brian Arnold
    Yes, if you are not represented then you can contact the attorney directly.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/29/2011
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