Since he cannot return to work, what options does he have? 2 Answers as of September 15, 2015

A family member received shoulder surgery for a work-related injury last November. Since then, he has been placed on Permanent and Stationary Disability. Although his SSI and insurance claims cover a portion of his living expenses, he is interested in supplementing his income, given his free time. For example, should he invest his savings in stocks and/or business ventures, how will this affect his status?

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Pius Joseph A Professional Law Corp. | Pius Joseph
If your friend has assets that precludes public benefits he may need a special needs trust to protect the assets from a bar of benefits. Also he can consider a structure to protect the Wc
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/15/2015
Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
For a variety of reasons, especially better knowing the actual facts of the situation and what they want, theses questions are best asked by the person directly involved and not a well meaning friend. ?First of all, immediately after surgery for a work related injury, a disabled person is on total temporary disability [2/3rd of salary in California, up to a certain maximum] and does not go onto permanent disability payments [a lesser bi-weekly rate] until they either return to work or are declared by a physician as having reached maximum likely improvement [permanent and stationary]. ?I do not think social security disability retirement benefits can be collected until their medical consultants declare the ?condition is P&S. There is absolutely no restriction for Workers' Compensation to return to work as long as it is within the permanent disability restrictions [which means in some cases the person can return to the same work they were doing beforee.g. accountant with heart attack going back to no heavy work], but you can not collect SSI and return to full time work, since that would mean you are not permanently disabled. He should briefly speak to an attorney who handles both types of disability programs. ?What he should do with his money is a question for a financial planner, not an attorney.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/15/2015
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